This discussion is closed.
Soulguy
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#1
Do a lot of Hindu people convert to Christianity after moving to the UK? The census shows that 10% of British-Indians are Christian whereas in India it is only 2%.
0
username3671370
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#2
Report 2 years ago
#2
(Original post by Soulguy)
Do a lot of Hindu people convert to Christianity after moving to the UK? The census shows that 10% of British-Indians are Christian whereas in India it is only 2%.
0
Poooky
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#3
Report 2 years ago
#3
(Original post by Guava Juice)
Most indian christians come from Kerala in India, where about 90% of the population is christian. Over the last 10 years, there have been many opportunities for those in Kerala to come abroad to countries such as the UK, where there are now large communities of these "Indian christians" which have been built. So the 10% aren't necessarily converts but more indian christians have had the opportunity to come, which results in their percentage of the population increasing.
It's 19% Christian- also most Christians will have been here for a lot longer than 10 years, they're a very well established group. And the largest group of Christians Indians are from Goa, not Kerala Keralites are more likely to migrate to the Gulf, which is where currently over 10% of Kerala's population lives

(Original post by Soulguy)
Do a lot of Hindu people convert to Christianity after moving to the UK? The census shows that 10% of British-Indians are Christian whereas in India it is only 2%.
Almost none will. As said above, they're more likely to immigrate (along with other groups like Punjabis and Gujaratis)
2
Soulguy
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#4
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#4
(Original post by Guava Juice)
Most indian christians come from Kerala in India, where about 90% of the population is christian. Over the last 10 years, there have been many opportunities for those in Kerala to come abroad to countries such as the UK, where there are now large communities of these "Indian christians" which have been built. So the 10% aren't necessarily converts but more indian christians have had the opportunity to come, which results in their percentage of the population increasing.
Kerala is actually 18% Christian, 27% Muslim and 55% Hindu.
2
Soulguy
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#5
(Original post by Poooky)
It's 19% Christian- also most Christians will have been here for a lot longer than 10 years, they're a very well established group. And the largest group of Christians Indians are from Goa, not Kerala Keralites are more likely to migrate to the Gulf, which is where currently over 10% of Kerala's population lives



Almost none will. As said above, they're more likely to immigrate (along with other groups like Punjabis and Gujaratis)
Ah, so you are saying they are not converts, but that the Christians back in India are more likely to emigrate? Why is that?

And why haven't I met any? I know a lot of Indian Hindus and Muslims, also a few Sikhs. But I don't know any Indian Christians.
0
Poooky
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#6
Report 2 years ago
#6
(Original post by Soulguy)
Ah, so you are saying they are not converts, but that the Christians back in India are more likely to emigrate? Why is that?

And why haven't I met any? I know a lot of Indian Hindus and Muslims, also a few Sikhs. But I don't know any Indian Christians.
Most groups in India with large UK diasporas have emigrated within a time period, usually with an associated reason, e.g East Indian Gujus moved to the UK when they were expelled from countries like Uganda etc I can only assume there's a similar reason for Christians, but I wouldn't know what it was. This link will be interesting for you, have a read:

http://www.shapworkingparty.org.uk/j...08/nesbitt.pdf

From the article,


Spoiler:
Show

The first South Asian Christian community in the UK was Goan: this was because, after thePortuguese acquired Goa in 1510, it became a favourite seaport for the East India Company.Subsequently, in the second half of the twentieth century, Goans arrived in Britain from, forexample, Kenya and Pakistan. 98% of Goans in the UK are Roman Catholic, even though inGoa itself the percentage of Catholics is probably less than 27% and declining.


The twentieth century saw the immigration and settlement of South Asians in much moresubstantial numbers. Christians from the north Indian state of Punjab migrated along withthe much larger number of Sikhs and Hindus during the 1950s and 1960s and settledparticularly in Southall, Wolverhampton, Birmingham, Coventry and Oxford.


They're concentrated in certain areas I'm guessing? I've know many in London
0
Soulguy
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#7
(Original post by Poooky)
Most groups in India with large UK diasporas have emigrated within a time period, usually with an associated reason, e.g East Indian Gujus moved to the UK when they were expelled from countries like Uganda etc I can only assume there's a similar reason for Christians, but I wouldn't know what it was. This link will be interesting for you, have a read:

http://www.shapworkingparty.org.uk/j...08/nesbitt.pdf

From the article,


Spoiler:
Show


The first South Asian Christian community in the UK was Goan: this was because, after thePortuguese acquired Goa in 1510, it became a favourite seaport for the East India Company.Subsequently, in the second half of the twentieth century, Goans arrived in Britain from, forexample, Kenya and Pakistan. 98% of Goans in the UK are Roman Catholic, even though inGoa itself the percentage of Catholics is probably less than 27% and declining.


The twentieth century saw the immigration and settlement of South Asians in much moresubstantial numbers. Christians from the north Indian state of Punjab migrated along withthe much larger number of Sikhs and Hindus during the 1950s and 1960s and settledparticularly in Southall, Wolverhampton, Birmingham, Coventry and Oxford.



They're concentrated in certain areas I'm guessing? I've know many in London
Do they have the same name as the Hindus?
And are they are very religious community?
0
Poooky
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#8
Report 2 years ago
#8
(Original post by Soulguy)
Do they have the same name as the Hindus?
And are they are very religious community?
The ones I know all have Christian names but I don't know whether this is widespread? Surnames like Braganza, D'Souza are common where I'm from.
Yes, they're likely to be practicing Christians and go to Church regularly. Of course like all communities, parents are stricter than the children as they probably grew up in India with Indian culture influence.
0
Soulguy
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#9
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#9
(Original post by Poooky)
The ones I know all have Christian names but I don't know whether this is widespread? Surnames like Braganza, D'Souza are common where I'm from.
Yes, they're likely to be practicing Christians and go to Church regularly. Of course like all communities, parents are stricter than the children as they probably grew up in India with Indian culture influence.
That's very strange considering that this country church attendance statistics for the whole population is very low.
And honestly I thought it was common for Hindus to become Christian after they come to the UK.

Is their community well integrated with the Indian Hindu and Indian Muslim communities?
0
Poooky
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#10
Report 2 years ago
#10
(Original post by Soulguy)
That's very strange considering that this country church attendance statistics for the whole population is very low.
And honestly I thought it was common for Hindus to become Christian after they come to the UK.

Is their community well integrated with the Indian Hindu and Indian Muslim communities?
Some will become Christians but it's isolated cases only. Yep, general statistics for Church attendance are low, it's higher in the Indian communities, esp as they tend to have/form their own Churches therefore it's a more active community. But they're from a much stricter culture, so in a few generations where they will be 4/5th generation there will likely be the same trends as shown in the native population.

I believe so, an example is Southall. My school friendship group had all three if that counts for anything
0
RVNmax
  • Study Helper
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#11
Report 2 years ago
#11
(Original post by Soulguy)
Do they have the same name as the Hindus?
And are they are very religious community?
From the link that Poooky provided: http://www.shapworkingparty.org.uk/j...08/nesbitt.pdf -

Quite apart from the diversity of economic background and educational
experience, their families have come from different parts of the sub-continent (and so have
distinct languages as well as traditions of diet, dress and celebration), and they are
associated with a range of Christian denominations, some well-known in the UK and others
specifically rooted in India.
As names are usually linked with language, yes they often have the same names as Indian Hindus. Of course they may be given English names just like any other natives are given. But as Poooky pointed out, there are a few popular names, especially from the Goan region, that are influenced from the west and therefore won't be present in other Indian communities. Another one that I just thought of is D'Costa. Look at the West Indies cricket team for others, and you'll see a mixture of names that you'd consider as usually Christian and usually Hindu for the same person and sometimes even within the same name. e.g. Shivnarine Chanderpaul.
And just like that, a lot of these communities consider themselves a mixture of Hindu and Christian, especially because living alongside it's only normal for interfaith marriages.

I haven't actually seen any Punjabi Christians personally, but family friends of mine are Rajasthani Christians which I is close enough. Most Indian Christians that I meet are actually Tamil and from the south of India, which I guess is culturally linked to the Sri Lankan Christians, as all of whom I meet have similar 'Hindu' surnames, but vary in first names. I also live in West London and am of Hindu-Punjabi descent.
1
Soulguy
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#12
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#12
(Original post by RVNmax)
From the link that Poooky provided: http://www.shapworkingparty.org.uk/j...08/nesbitt.pdf -



As names are usually linked with language, yes they often have the same names as Indian Hindus. Of course they may be given English names just like any other natives are given. But as Poooky pointed out, there are a few popular names, especially from the Goan region, that are influenced from the west and therefore won't be present in other Indian communities. Another one that I just thought of is D'Costa. Look at the West Indies cricket team for others, and you'll see a mixture of names that you'd consider as usually Christian and usually Hindu for the same person and sometimes even within the same name. e.g. Shivnarine Chanderpaul.
And just like that, a lot of these communities consider themselves a mixture of Hindu and Christian, especially because living alongside it's only normal for interfaith marriages.

I haven't actually seen any Punjabi Christians personally, but family friends of mine are Rajasthani Christians which I is close enough. Most Indian Christians that I meet are actually Tamil and from the south of India, which I guess is culturally linked to the Sri Lankan Christians, as all of whom I meet have similar 'Hindu' surnames, but vary in first names. I also live in West London and am of Hindu-Punjabi descent.
Maybe I have met them, but I have assumed they are Hindu. I mean I know a lot of Muslims from India and they have different names.

I've met Punjabi Christians. There is actually a sizable minority of over 2% of Punjab, Pakistan that are Christian.
0
Uranium Potato
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#13
Report 2 years ago
#13
I'm a Catholic from Kerala, and you believe me - as far as i know, (where i live anyway) there are farrrrrrrr more many kerala christians than goans. There are a lot of goan christians, but there's way more in number. We as a community, are very active in church. But like everyone else, most people come to church on Sunday. In my family, we are very religious, which i particularly enjoy, we try to go to church every day. I only know three catholic goans (children), while i know a couple hundred keralites (children) and much more adults - obviously since i'm apart of that community. The faith our parents received from their parents carried on towards us. Back in India, we are a very religious folk. Celebrating all the catholic feasts as a vibrant community brings us together.

Back in 50 CE, Jesus' apostle - Saint Thomas came to kerala - thats where our ancestors converted to the Christian faith, I think we were mostly hindus before that.

My mum said that we came from India, as in the 2000's there was a huge lack of nurses and health staff, so the NHS recruited A LOT of people from India, a lot from Kerala too. So I'm guessing quite a lot of keralites came back then.

I know many keralites, and the lack of kerala hindus and muslims is that they don't migrate here that much. There are a lot of Kerala Christians, Muslims and Hindues in the Gulf, Austrailia and America as well.

Of course, I could be wrong about the number of goans, since i'm not one myself - i don't know much in detail. Just a keralites' point of view.

:-)
1
just why?
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#14
Report 2 years ago
#14
umm need to think more carefully about those stats in op...
0
IndChris
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#15
Report 7 months ago
#15
Because you haven't met them ): . There are 100s of Indian Christian churches in the UK
0
Pinkisk
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#16
Report 7 months ago
#16
(Original post by Soulguy)
Do a lot of Hindu people convert to Christianity after moving to the UK? The census shows that 10% of British-Indians are Christian whereas in India it is only 2%.
The Indian Christian community is not made up of converts, neither here or anywhere else. It is one of the oldest Christian communities in the world, I think, older than Christianity in Britain. I think they were converted to Christianity by the Christian Saint Paul, around 1900 years ago, but I am not sure about this.

There may be a higher proportion of Christian Indians here than in India for a number of reasons, one being that more of them have reason to immigrate. It could be that India is more diverse than Britain. Hence, they make up a smaller proportion in India than they do here. It could be other reasons too. Though I highly doubt that conversion is one of these reasons because there is little to no effort to convert anyone to Christianity here as Christianity is long dead in this country. The vast majority of Britains are either non-practicing christians or atheists.
Last edited by Pinkisk; 7 months ago
0
glowing_starfish
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#17
Report 2 months ago
#17
Lol I’m an Indian Christian
0
X
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

What are you most likely to do if you don't get the grades you were expecting?

Go through Clearing (101)
37.97%
Take autumn exams (86)
32.33%
Look for a job (8)
3.01%
Consider an apprenticeship (9)
3.38%
Take a year out (45)
16.92%
Something else (let us know in the thread!) (17)
6.39%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed