dawnngyuen
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Hi all!

I hope I've posted in the right forum, my apologies if I'm wrong here.

I'm in my fourth year earning my BSc in Canada. I don't think my GPA is high enough for any Canadian pharmacy schools, so I am looking into attending UK pharmacy schools as an option instead.

I'm just not sure where to start, what the requirements are, which schools to go to, what is recognized by Canadian licensing bodies, etc.

Do you HAVE to get the MPharm in order to practice in Canada? Or can it be any Pharmacy related masters? I am interested in going to the following schools:

University of Leeds
University of York
Newcastle University
University of East Anglia
University of Sussex


I believe you have to do at least a 4 year BSc program to be able to practice in Canada, but I'm not sure if it has to be the MPharm or if it can be any pharmacy/pharmacology program.

It'd be great to hear from other Canadian students who have done this too!

Any help or advice would be great!
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artful_lounger
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In the UK Pharmacy (as with Medicine and Law) is an undergraduate degree - thus Pharmacy courses in the UK are typically 4-5 years long as they include the relevant "pre-pharm" content in the earlier years. I highly doubt you would be able to skip this, as these courses are designed to train NHS pharmacists who meet the requirements of the relevant UK pharmacy accrediting body (or bodies). You will need to investigate the relevant Canadian analogues to these, and ideally contact them directly to find out what will qualify you to become a dispensing pharmacist there.

I doubt anyone here will know that specific jurisdictional information - remember that health professions requirements and the laws governing these professions vary between countries, sometimes considerably. While the relevant scientific principles will be the same, there is much more to these healthcare professions than just those - particularly with the structure of the NHS being quite different to most healthcare programmes elsewhere in the world. These courses are training specifically around this structure and so may not cover key content required to become licensed in another country.

I would note that Pharmacology is not Pharmacy, and is the academic study of drug interactions and mechanisms (and sometimes design). If you want to work in a lab (academic or industrial) investigating how drugs work, you should study Pharmacology. If you want to work in a Pharmacy dispensing medicines for prescriptions, you need to study Pharmacy. They are fundamentally different fields, although ostensibly they will be studying some of the same core content and are both concerned with drugs and pharmaceuticals to some extent. Certainly in the UK (and US, since weirdly something like half my family are Pharmacists...) studying Pharmacology would not be sufficient - in the US you would still need to study a PharmD or whatever it's called, and in the UK it wouldn't suffice in itself and would require you to follow a Pharmacy programme - and unlike Medicine here, I'm not aware of any specific "graduate entry Pharmacy" courses (although they are funded by SFE as a second degree programme I believe, for domestic students).

Realistically you're going to need to identify the relevant governing and accrediting bodies for the profession in Canada and find out more about the legal requirements to become a dispensing Pharmacist from them or elsewhere, before looking at the courses in the UK - as you may find that based on the information you acquire from them, there are no relevant courses in the UK, or that the only ones are in fact full undergraduate degrees that are 4-5 years long.
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