rachyyyy
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I know Strathclyde Uni is a 4-year degree and Glasgow Uni is a 5-year degree, does anyone know why Glasgow is an extra year and if its better than Strathclyde or not?
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artful_lounger
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As far as I can see Strathclyde doesn't offer a "Medicinal Chemistry" degree, although they do have Chemistry with Drug Discover and Biochemistry.

In any case, Glasgow's degrees follow the Scottish format, which take one year longer than English (and Welsh, and I believe NI) degrees. They typically have slightly less stringent requirements for prerequisite subjects, although this varies. They have options for second year entry for students who have done A-levels or Advanced Highers and equivalent - this usually requires higher entry criteria than year one entry. Additionally, the funding format is such that it will not cost more than an equivalent length course in England for English students. The 5 year course is due to the fact it's an "undergraduate master's" MChem course, rather than a MA/BSc. It would be similar in content frmo years 2-5 to a 4 year MChem course in England.

Both are good, and Strathclyde has strengths in STEM areas generally and Chemical Engineering (which may reflect favourably on it's chemistry department as well, potentailly). However Glasgow is, in general, just one step short of Edinburgh/Oxbridge, and similar broadly to St Andrews. It's by far one of the best universities in Scotland. However Strathclyde is very good in general and may rival Glasgow in some areas - you may want to look at how their chemistry department in particular fares. It also has a great deal of industrial links for years in industry and similar, and I understand quite good graduate placements. It was originally founded on these principles, whereas Glasgow historically has been a traditional academic insitution. As such it may emphasise academic research in it's methods of teaching and options for e.g. final year dissertations/projects/etc, and I don't know what if any offerings it has in terms of industrial placements.

Realistically you should have good graduate prospects in either industry or academia (e.g. pursuing master's or PhD courses) with a good degree from either of them. Outside of the relevant industries Glasgow's "brand name" may be recognised somewhat more than Strathclyde, particularly internationally. If your intent is to work at Goldman Sachs NYC then Glasgow would probably be the better option for this purpose. Within the chemical related industries however, both will suitably prepare you (possibly through slightly different methods) to work in those which is more important in that sector and in other STEM sectors generally.
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rachyyyy
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
As far as I can see Strathclyde doesn't offer a "Medicinal Chemistry" degree, although they do have Chemistry with Drug Discover and Biochemistry.

In any case, Glasgow's degrees follow the Scottish format, which take one year longer than English (and Welsh, and I believe NI) degrees. They typically have slightly less stringent requirements for prerequisite subjects, although this varies. They have options for second year entry for students who have done A-levels or Advanced Highers and equivalent - this usually requires higher entry criteria than year one entry. Additionally, the funding format is such that it will not cost more than an equivalent length course in England for English students. The 5 year course is due to the fact it's an "undergraduate master's" MChem course, rather than a MA/BSc. It would be similar in content frmo years 2-5 to a 4 year MChem course in England.

Both are good, and Strathclyde has strengths in STEM areas generally and Chemical Engineering (which may reflect favourably on it's chemistry department as well, potentailly). However Glasgow is, in general, just one step short of Edinburgh/Oxbridge, and similar broadly to St Andrews. It's by far one of the best universities in Scotland. However Strathclyde is very good in general and may rival Glasgow in some areas - you may want to look at how their chemistry department in particular fares. It also has a great deal of industrial links for years in industry and similar, and I understand quite good graduate placements. It was originally founded on these principles, whereas Glasgow historically has been a traditional academic insitution. As such it may emphasise academic research in it's methods of teaching and options for e.g. final year dissertations/projects/etc, and I don't know what if any offerings it has in terms of industrial placements.

Realistically you should have good graduate prospects in either industry or academia (e.g. pursuing master's or PhD courses) with a good degree from either of them. Outside of the relevant industries Glasgow's "brand name" may be recognised somewhat more than Strathclyde, particularly internationally. If your intent is to work at Goldman Sachs NYC then Glasgow would probably be the better option for this purpose. Within the chemical related industries however, both will suitably prepare you (possibly through slightly different methods) to work in those which is more important in that sector and in other STEM sectors generally.
So there's no major difference between chemistry with drugs discovery at strathclyde and medicinal chemistry at Glasgow Uni in regards to the quality of the degree at the end?
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by rachyyyy)
So there's no major difference between chemistry with drugs discovery at strathclyde and medicinal chemistry at Glasgow Uni in regards to the quality of the degree at the end?
There will be differences in specific module offerings, and likely in their research emphases and hence project/dissertation possibilities. However neither will disadvantage you significantly in the long run, so pick the one you like best. The only thing worth noting is that "medicinal chemistry" tends to be a slightly broader area than "drug discovery" so there may be more options for biochemistry/pharmacology content in the course - as above, look at the specific course offerings and see what suits your interests
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