Trying to figure out how website was created

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Fruli
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#1
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#1
I was wondering if anyone is able to tell me whether or not this is a Wordpress developed site:

https://engaging.works/me
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sexilexi
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#2
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#2
i dunno
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kkboyk
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#3
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#3
(Original post by Fruli)
I was wondering if anyone is able to tell me whether or not this is a Wordpress developed site:

https://engaging.works/me
Doesn't seem so. You can check the source code and this website.
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Fruli
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#4
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#4
(Original post by kkboyk)
Doesn't seem so. You can check the source code and this website.
Oh thank you so much. Very useful.
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Fruli
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#5
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#5
(Original post by tinycharlie)
i dunno
What's the point of responding since you have nothing useful to say?

I pity you for having so much time on your hands.
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sexilexi
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#6
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#6
Hahaha that comment made my time spent writing that comment worth it
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Fruli
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#7
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#7
(Original post by tinycharlie)
Hahaha that comment made my time spent writing that comment worth it
That’s because you live a sad life and have to troll for your enjoyment. You feel you have to make yourself relevant somehow, pathetic.
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Ganjaweed Rebel
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#8
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#8
It was created in someone's bedroom on a template and later sold to its current owner who has a more corporate set up.
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winterscoming
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#9
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#9
In most modern web browsers you can hit the F12 key to open browser's developer window and take a peek at the website's code.

The first thing I notice in the developer window for that site is this:
Code:
<app-root ng-version="4.3.6">
'ng-version' indicates that the main toolkit used to build the website is a framework called Angular. Angular is a tool for designing fully-blown interactive web apps. If you're looking to try to replicate all of the complex interactive web-app stuff on this website, then you might be looking at a lot of work. I wouldn't be surprised if there's a lot of bespoke, custom functionality scattered around the site, probably created by an experienced web developer.

If you're purely interested in using the general appearance and layout of the site as inspiration for your own website, then you could build something which looks similar, just having knowledge of HTML, CSS and Bootstrap. (you could use the F12 developer window in your browser to look at which CSS styles they use and borrow those to get a similar layout/feel).

if you are completely new to this sort of thing, then consider spending time trying these tutorials to get the basics - these things are the fundamental building-blocks of the web: https://www.codecademy.com/catalog/language/html-css
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username3482522
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#10
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#10
I highly doubt it because, according to its source code, it uses the Boostrap framework and the Owl Carousel jQuery plugin. Trying to use the Boostrap framework, a long with Wordpress, is effort and using the Owl Carousel jQuery, a long with Wordpress, is a lot of effort. Who would want to do that, when Wordpress already provides an easier way to have a responsive website with slideshows?

Out of curiosity, why do you need to know that?
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Fruli
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#11
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#11
(Original post by winterscoming)
In most modern web browsers you can hit the F12 key to open browser's developer window and take a peek at the website's code.

The first thing I notice in the developer window for that site is this:
Code:
<app-root ng-version="4.3.6">
'ng-version' indicates that the main toolkit used to build the website is a framework called Angular. Angular is a tool for designing fully-blown interactive web apps. If you're looking to try to replicate all of the complex interactive web-app stuff on this website, then you might be looking at a lot of work. I wouldn't be surprised if there's a lot of bespoke, custom functionality scattered around the site, probably created by an experienced web developer.

If you're purely interested in using the general appearance and layout of the site as inspiration for your own website, then you could build something which looks similar, just having knowledge of HTML, CSS and Bootstrap. (you could use the F12 developer window in your browser to look at which CSS styles they use and borrow those to get a similar layout/feel).

if you are completely new to this sort of thing, then consider spending time trying these tutorials to get the basics - these things are the fundamental building-blocks of the web: https://www.codecademy.com/catalog/language/html-css
Thank you so much. This is really useful. I’ll checkout the coding academy.

Yes, I would be wanting to replicate many complex features on the website. There’s even an option to complete a personality assessment once registered as a user. I think it’s so amazing.

Presumably they have all the data stored on a server somewhere.

I had wondered if it was Wordpress because I’ve seen similar templates that allow the banner to go across the whole page. I’ve tried to use Wordpress templates, but they lack the features that I need to bring my idea to life and no plugins have helped. I think I might also need a server as I would also be wanting to store candidate & prospective recruiter’s data.

My exposure to html is so basic, I will need to dedicate a lot of time to learning.
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Fruli
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#12
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#12
(Original post by num.7)
I highly doubt it because, according to its source code, it uses the Boostrap framework and the Owl Carousel jQuery plugin. Trying to use the Boostrap framework, a long with Wordpress, is effort and using the Owl Carousel jQuery, a long with Wordpress, is a lot of effort. Who would want to do that, when Wordpress already provides an easier way to have a responsive website with slideshows?

Out of curiosity, why do you need to know that?
Thank you. I’m working on a business concept and there are so many features on this site that I like and have been trying to implement on my website. I tried Wordpress but couldn’t find the right plugins, so I’m kinda stuck. It seems the only option is to pay people to do it, but if I can learn how to do it myself that would be a better option.
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winterscoming
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#13
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#13
(Original post by Fruli)
Thank you so much. This is really useful. I’ll checkout the coding academy.

Yes, I would be wanting to replicate many complex features on the website. There’s even an option to complete a personality assessment once registered as a user. I think it’s so amazing.

Presumably they have all the data stored on a server somewhere.

I had wondered if it was Wordpress because I’ve seen similar templates that all a the banner to go across the whole page. I’ve tried to use Wordpress templates, but they lack the features that I need to bring my idea to life and no plugins have helped. I think I might also need a server as I would also be wanting to store candidate & prospective recruiter’s data.

My exposure to html is so basic, I will need to dedicate a lot of time to learning.
I'm glad that you're interested! Everybody has to start somewhere, it'lll take time just like anything else, but there's tonnes of information around, and other websites similar to Codecademy too. Learning how to create interesting layouts with HTML, CSS and Bootstrap is a great place to begin anyway.

If you're interested in building the "interactive" side of websites, the next natural step afterwards would be to learn about JavaScript - you can learn about the basics of this from the Codecademy site too. JavaScript is the final building-block of the web, at least as far as your browser is concerned.

Building the server-side of a website (AKA the Web Service) is yet another whole other set of skills, which are no less important, but you have a lot more choices to make there, whereas HTML, CSS and JavaScript are universal.

Web services can run on many different things - for now, I'd make sure you're happy with all the basics above.

When you're ready for looking at Web services, you need to make some choices - there's no single best choice nor set of tools or programming language for this stuff.

Some server-side technologies may be more accessible (perhaps easier) than others due to how easily you can find online resources such as tools, courses and tutorials, and the quality of those resources too - the worst thing about learning something new is when the courses and tutorials may as well be written in Greek. It is highly frustrating and deeply demotivating when all the information is written by super-intelligent braniacs who forget that the rest of us prefer plain English

There's a good list of web server technologies here:
https://www.codeschool.com/beginners...side-languages

It is possible to use JavaScript to build a web server, and it may be easy to get started with that, but building a web server is also a good excuse and opportunity to learn another language which is really more suited to the task. In the long term, you'd probably be better off choosing something other than JavaScript for your server.

Python is a great language to learn (which is why so many schools, colleges and universities have chosen it to introduce their students to coding). ASP.NET is also great for this kind of stuff too because its creators (Microsoft) have thought of just about everything you could imagine, and spent billions building loads of freely-available tools, tutorials, courses, etc - so it's also very accessible to a newcomer.

The other server-side technologies/tools mentioned by that site might be great too, but I've never used those.

Finally - if you manage to get this far, you've probably already spent a few months learning, and you'll probably have a whole bunch of different questions. You'll probably do well to reach a point where you can build client-side stuff with HTML/CSS/Bootstrap/JavaScript, and where you can do some basic Server-side stuff too, before trying to learn the fancy interactive Angular stuff.
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Fruli
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#14
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#14
(Original post by winterscoming)
I'm glad that you're interested! Everybody has to start somewhere, it'lll take time just like anything else, but there's tonnes of information around, and other websites similar to Codecademy too. Learning how to create interesting layouts with HTML, CSS and Bootstrap is a great place to begin anyway.

If you're interested in building the "interactive" side of websites, the next natural step afterwards would be to learn about JavaScript - you can learn about the basics of this from the Codecademy site too. JavaScript is the final building-block of the web, at least as far as your browser is concerned.

Building the server-side of a website (AKA the Web Service) is yet another whole other set of skills, which are no less important, but you have a lot more choices to make there, whereas HTML, CSS and JavaScript are universal.

Web services can run on many different things - for now, I'd make sure you're happy with all the basics above.

When you're ready for looking at Web services, you need to make some choices - there's no single best choice nor set of tools or programming language for this stuff.

Some server-side technologies may be more accessible (perhaps easier) than others due to how easily you can find online resources such as tools, courses and tutorials, and the quality of those resources too - the worst thing about learning something new is when the courses and tutorials may as well be written in Greek. It is highly frustrating and deeply demotivating when all the information is written by super-intelligent braniacs who forget that the rest of us prefer plain English

There's a good list of web server technologies here:
https://www.codeschool.com/beginners...side-languages

It is possible to use JavaScript to build a web server, and it may be easy to get started with that, but building a web server is also a good excuse and opportunity to learn another language which is really more suited to the task. In the long term, you'd probably be better off choosing something other than JavaScript for your server.

Python is a great language to learn (which is why so many schools, colleges and universities have chosen it to introduce their students to coding). ASP.NET is also great for this kind of stuff too because its creators (Microsoft) have thought of just about everything you could imagine, and spent billions building loads of freely-available tools, tutorials, courses, etc - so it's also very accessible to a newcomer.

The other server-side technologies/tools mentioned by that site might be great too, but I've never used those.

Finally - if you manage to get this far, you've probably already spent a few months learning, and you'll probably have a whole bunch of different questions. You'll probably do well to reach a point where you can build client-side stuff with HTML/CSS/Bootstrap/JavaScript, and where you can do some basic Server-side stuff too, before trying to learn the fancy interactive Angular stuff.
Thank you so much. You obviously know your stuff. This is so helpful.

I’ll let you know how I get on. I hope I will have something of substance by July next year.

Coding is a really important skill to learn and can open so many doors.
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winterscoming
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#15
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#15
(Original post by Fruli)
Thank you so much. You obviously know your stuff. This is so helpful.

I’ll let you know how I get on. I hope I will have something of substance by July next year.

Coding is a really important skill to learn and can open so many doors.
Good luck with it! I'm interested in hearing how you get on - I'll try my best to help if you get stuck. Glad that I could be at least point you in some direction for now at least

If you've got enough time to spend with this stuff over the next 6-7 months, then I expect you will at least be able to pick up a lot of HTML/CSS/JavaScript stuff; hopefully with plenty of time to dabble around with server-side things too.

As you say, being able to understand code and build things yourself is a great skill to have - even if a career in IT isn't your cup of tea, it's becoming a core skill for loads of other careers, since you'll find a lot of jobs with some cross-over with code, automation, databases, etc. If nothing else, having an understanding about how to build these kinds of things looks great on a CV, and helps when communicating with any other technically-minded people you might work with.
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