Zonyali123
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Size:  527.4 KBHow would you answer this question? Please give me the answer step by step with the method.
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Kevin De Bruyne
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(Original post by Zonyali123)
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Size:  527.4 KBHow would you answer this question? Please give me the answer step by step with the method.
If I asked you to shade in the parts of the table that fulfill the conditions specified, would that help?
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Zonyali123
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(Original post by Kevin De Bruyne)
If I asked you to shade in the parts of the table that fulfill the conditions specified, would that help?
What do you mean?
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Kevin De Bruyne
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(Original post by Zonyali123)
What do you mean?
Grab a pencil and look at the table given cell by cell until you spot the pattern.

Let's look at the top left cell, the A* in both subjects cell. Does it satisfy the condition specified in the question about the grade difference? If yes, shade it. If not, move on in any direction (e.g.) move one cell right.

Keep doing this until you can shade in all the relevant parts from the table.
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Zonyali123
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(Original post by Kevin De Bruyne)
Grab a pencil and look at the table given cell by cell until you spot the pattern.

Let's look at the top left cell, the A* in both subjects cell. Does it satisfy the condition specified in the question about the grade difference? If yes, shade it. If not, move on in any direction (e.g.) move one cell right.

Keep doing this until you can shade in all the relevant parts from the table.
I'm getting 13% which I think is wrong.
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Kevin De Bruyne
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(Original post by Zonyali123)
I'm getting 13% which I think is wrong.
What was your method? What was the final calculation?

By my calculation you are out by a small amount.
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Zonyali123
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(Original post by Kevin De Bruyne)
What was your method? What was the final calculation?

By my calculation you are out by a small amount.
I think I've done it wrong. I don't know how to do it. Please explain.
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Kevin De Bruyne
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(Original post by Zonyali123)
I think I've done it wrong. I don't know how to do it. Please explain.
Please ask me specific questions. Read the post below first then ask if you are unsure of what it means or if you have found the answer.


(Original post by Kevin De Bruyne)
Grab a pencil and look at the table given cell by cell until you spot the pattern.

Let's look at the top left cell, the A* in both subjects cell. Does it satisfy the condition specified in the question about the grade difference(grade in English being at least 2 more than grade in music) If yes, shade it. If not, move on in any direction (e.g.) move one cell right and ask the same question

Keep doing this until you can shade in all the relevant parts from the table.
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Zonyali123
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(Original post by Kevin De Bruyne)
Please ask me specific questions. Read the post below first then ask if you are unsure of what it means or if you have found the answer.
I don't know how to read the graph.
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Kevin De Bruyne
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(Original post by Zonyali123)
I don't know how to read the graph.
No probelm.

The table lists 6 GCSE grades, A*-E.

Forgetting about the table for a minute, let's say you take two subjects, English and Music, and 100 people from your year who all take both English and Music.

Now, let's say the grades range from A*-E in both subjects. So any student could have anything like:
A* in English and A* in music (A*, A*) - a really smart chap.
A* in English and E in music (A*, E) - someone like me who has no hand-eye co-ordination
C in English and A* in music (C,A*) -

So if you think about it, there are 36 combinations of grades possible (6*6). The number isn't important but it's their existence that matters. This also takes into account that (A*,C) is interpreted as A* in English, C in Music, whereas (C,A*) is C in English, A* in Music.

This is what the table is representing.

You have GCSE Music at the top of the table. The columns (the ones that go up and down) represent the grades in Music. The rows (the ones that go left and right) are for GCSE English.

So if you look at the top left cell (entry) which has the number '4' in it, it's the intersection of a row and a column. Which row and column is it? It's the column A* in Music and A* in Maths. We interpret this as 4 people having an A* in both subjects.

Let's go one cell to the right. It's in the A column for music but still in the A* column for English, so we say that 5 people got an A in music and A* in English.

So what does the cell with '19' in it represent?
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Zonyali123
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(Original post by Kevin De Bruyne)
No probelm.

The table lists 6 GCSE grades, A*-E.

Forgetting about the table for a minute, let's say you take two subjects, English and Music, and 100 people from your year who all take both English and Music.

Now, let's say the grades range from A*-E in both subjects. So any student could have anything like:
A* in English and A* in music (A*, A*) - a really smart chap.
A* in English and E in music (A*, E) - someone like me who has no hand-eye co-ordination
C in English and A* in music (C,A*) -

So if you think about it, there are 36 combinations of grades possible (6*6). The number isn't important but it's their existence that matters. This also takes into account that (A*,C) is interpreted as A* in English, C in Music, whereas (C,A*) is C in English, A* in Music.

This is what the table is representing.

You have GCSE Music at the top of the table. The columns (the ones that go up and down) represent the grades in Music. The rows (the ones that go left and right) are for GCSE English.

So if you look at the top left cell (entry) which has the number '4' in it, it's the intersection of a row and a column. Which row and column is it? It's the column A* in Music and A* in Maths. We interpret this as 4 people having an A* in both subjects.

Let's go one cell to the right. It's in the A column for music but still in the A* column for English, so we say that 5 people got an A in music and A* in English.

So what does the cell with '19' in it represent?
That 19 people go a B in both music and English 🤔
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Kevin De Bruyne
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(Original post by Zonyali123)
That 19 people go a B in both music and English 🤔
Correct!

So you can read the table now, right?

If so, then read my previous post about the shading.
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Zonyali123
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(Original post by Kevin De Bruyne)
Correct!

So you can read the table now, right?

If so, then read my previous post about the shading.
Yes, I can read it now but they've just made it so difficult because it's easy to get confused.
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Zonyali123
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What am I supposed to shade?
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Kevin De Bruyne
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(Original post by Zonyali123)
What am I supposed to shade?
I will repost my original suggestion with clarifications. Please ask specific questions if you are unsure.

Grab a pencil and look at the table given, cell by cell until you spot the pattern. Look at the cells, interpret what they mean and then shade them if they meet the criteria. If not, leave it unshaded. To get started...

Let's look at the top left cell, the A* in both subjects cell. Does it satisfy the condition specified in the question about the grade difference (grade in English being at least 2 more than grade in music)? If yes, shade it. If not, move on in any direction (e.g.) move one cell right and ask the same question

Keep doing this until you can shade in all the relevant parts from the table.
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Zonyali123
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Please explain further
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Zonyali123
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(Original post by Kevin De Bruyne)
I will repost my original suggestion with clarifications. Please ask specific questions if you are unsure.

Grab a pencil and look at the table given, cell by cell until you spot the pattern. Look at the cells, interpret what they mean and then shade them if they meet the criteria. If not, leave it unshaded. To get started...

Let's look at the top left cell, the A* in both subjects cell. Does it satisfy the condition specified in the question about the grade difference (grade in English being at least 2 more than grade in music)? If yes, shade it. If not, move on in any direction (e.g.) move one cell right and ask the same question

Keep doing this until you can shade in all the relevant parts from the table.
Hi, I've finally got it! 7+3+1+2+1+3=17 so 17/142 x 100. = 11.97....... is 12% to the nearest percent.
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Kevin De Bruyne
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(Original post by Zonyali123)
Hi, I've finally got it! 7+3+1+2+1+3=17 so 17/142 x 100. = 11.97....... is 12% to the nearest percent.
Agreed, well done
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