WWEKANE
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#1
i was just wondering that in the gene there is bases

my first question is it says in my book that each amino acid is coded for by a sequence of three bases in a gene

does this mean

AT then a G

or AT CG TA

My second question is what do the bases actually do are they just responsible for making a sequence of amino acids and if this is the case does that mean the base pattern basically decides the protein??
0
reply
artful_lounger
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#2
Report 2 years ago
#2
(Original post by WWEKANE)
i was just wondering that in the gene there is bases

my first question is it says in my book that each amino acid is coded for by a sequence of three bases in a gene

does this mean

AT then a G

or AT CG TA

My second question is what do the bases actually do are they just responsible for making a sequence of amino acids and if this is the case does that mean the base pattern basically decides the protein??
The former; ACG for example

For the second question, to my knowledge (which is limited to like...slightly beyond SL Bio ) yes essentially that's "all" they do - code amino acids. However these amino acids are chained together in various combinations to form proteins, which govern basically all biological processes in the body. So, as you go along the chain of things that happen in the body, ultimately they control all the functions and structures of the body.

There is undoubtedly a more detail once you get to A-level and certainly degree level, but I believe that should suffice for the purposes of GCSE. If you're interested in the fundamental aspects of it, you might want to consider pursuing a career in molecular biology/biochemistry
3
reply
WWEKANE
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#3
thank you
0
reply
artful_lounger
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#4
Report 2 years ago
#4
(Original post by WWEKANE)
thank you
No problem!

One of the resident biologists may be able to provide a more elucidating coverage, but I think that is correct to the level you're looking at

Unfortunately, I don't know of any to tag them in
0
reply
WWEKANE
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#5
(Original post by artful_lounger)
No problem!

One of the resident biologists may be able to provide a more elucidating coverage, but I think that is correct to the level you're looking at

Unfortunately, I don't know of any to tag them in
sorry can i ask one more question

it says in my book each amino acid is coded for by a sequence of three bases in the gene

what is ment by coded for does it mean made due to??
0
reply
username2858058
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#6
Report 2 years ago
#6
They have tonnes of functions. You dont really have to worry about them for your gcses

For example dna methylation, gene regulation, gene silencing, forming recognition sites for all sorts of proteins, forming regulatory elements, promoters, kozak sequences, forming all sorts of motifs and whatnot

It really is quite remarkable and fascinating
0
reply
artful_lounger
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#7
Report 2 years ago
#7
(Original post by WWEKANE)
sorry can i ask one more question

it says in my book each amino acid is coded for by a sequence of three bases in the gene

what is ment by coded for does it mean made due to??
Think of the bases as the elements of a code. Each amino acid has a three sequence "code" that corresponds to it (sort of anyway, several are redundant and code for the same one I think). So ACG will code for something different to CAG and CGA, for example (I don't actually know offhand what all these code for - replace the bases for whichever you like).

This comes from the order of the bases in the DNA/RNA strand (i.e. the "gene"). The details of how this "code" is read and implemented gets covered in A-level certainly, I'm not sure how much it would be in GCSE (I don't even remember learning about the bases in GCSE tbh, although that was nearly 10 years ago ). For the purposes of your curriculum, if it doesn't go further into detail that should be enough.

it's related overall to the concept of gene expression, which is a key part of modern biology and will be covered a fair bit at A-level and of course much more extensively in any bioscience degree (particularly in molecular biology/biochemistry courses, but it's relevant and something that will most likely be covered even in e.g. zoology). In essence the information (the "code" considered above) is moved from DNA to RNA to form proteins by way of amino acids, and then these proteins are the major source of interest for basically all other biology as they do...everything, more or less

This is a very rough description and pretty much the limit of my knowledge though...currently Translation (the latter stage) didn't get covered as much as transcription (the first bit - DNA to RNA) in SL, and/or I can't remember
0
reply
username2858058
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#8
Report 2 years ago
#8
basically it’s a code cuz it determines the sequence on the mRNA

And the sequence on the mRNA determines which tRNA with which amino acid comes in to form dat chain of amino acids
0
reply
username2858058
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#9
Report 2 years ago
#9
Hit me up if you need anything
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

With HE fairs postponed, would a virtual HE fair be useful?

Yes (68)
61.82%
No (42)
38.18%

Watched Threads

View All