biology sexual reproduction GCSE Watch

WWEKANE
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in the gcse aqa syallabus it says

"in sexual reproduction there is a mixing of genetic information which leads to variety in the offspring"

does this part refer to meiosis when the chromosomes are mixed in each gamete or during fertilisation

because i was thinking if so fertilisation i thought theres not an actual mix in genetic information just 2 pairs of each chromosome so there is a variety but theres no actual mixing going on if you understand what im saying
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amphibology
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I thought it was chromosomes n meiosis?? Because they pair up randomly, and the chromosomes break up randomly as well right??? I don't think it's fertilisation, other than perhaps when the cells that interact are random? But yeah, id lean with meiosis cos it's probably more technical??

Good luck dude.
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WWEKANE
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thanks man you to i was just wondering is meiosis part of sexual reproduction or is it only the actual part when sexual intercourse is done which is sexual reproduction
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amphibology
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(Original post by WWEKANE)
thanks man you to i was just wondering is meiosis part of sexual reproduction or is it only the actual part when sexual intercourse is done which is sexual reproduction
I think meiosis is for making gametes, which are not identical, but combined between two cells or smth (so sexual reproduction). Meiosis is the result of intercourse, which ig makes it sexual reproduction, but sexual intercourse isn't the only example of sexual reproduction.

Mitosis would be asexual because only one cell is involved, so the daughter cells are also identical - both to each other, and the original parent cell before it started dividing.

In meiosis, the daughter cells are different to each other, and the parent cells. Not only are the sets of chromosomes in each different, the homologous or whatever are also different. Each half of a chromosome might be randomly combined/varied, so the daughter cells are double non-identical, kind of?

I think, anyways. You might want to ask someone else as well, since I haven't looked at my revision guide.
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WWEKANE
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thanks for the help this makes sense😊
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