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    I'm so unsure of what to do. Looking back without realising I've always had a fascination for psychology, questioning why we do things, what motivates us exc. But I'm not sure whether or not I should pursue a degree in it mainly due to two things. Firstly it's oversubscribed even though there's many avenues you can take it's pretty poor in terms of graduate prospects. Secondly the perception of the degree, most see it as being pointless even referring to it as a mickey mouse degree. I'm not sure whether to do Psychology which I generally find interesting or to do a degree that's more academically demanding so that it opens more doors and doesn't hurt my ego. I know you shouldn't let the opinions of others influence your decision nor am I knocking psychology because I do value it's importance but I'm afraid most of us are subdued by the consensus of the masses . Any advice would really help thanks =)
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    (Original post by Anagogic)
    I'm so unsure of what to do. Looking back without realising I've always had a fascination for psychology, questioning why we do things, what motivates us exc. But I'm not sure whether or not I should pursue a degree in it mainly due to two things. Firstly it's oversubscribed even though there's many avenues you can take it's pretty poor in terms of graduate prospects. Secondly the perception of the degree, most see it as being pointless even referring to it as a mickey mouse degree. I'm not sure whether to do Psychology which I generally find interesting or to do a degree that's more academically demanding so that it opens more doors and doesn't hurt my ego. I know you shouldn't let the opinions of others influence your decision nor am I knocking psychology because I do value it's importance but I'm afraid most of us are subdued by the consensus of the masses . Any advice would really help thanks =)
    Psychology as a subject is quite good, though the perception of it being Mickey Mouse is probably just because its new and because the a level and university course often don't attract the best applicants. If you're applying for general graduate jobs I don't think it will be seen as any worse than something like English Literature or Biology or History.

    The main issue is that you don't learn any skills that are massively in demand in this country - if you do Engineering, Computer Science or maths you can much more easily walk into a job in that field. That's not really the case for psychology, although there are lots of interesting jobs within psychology they are very competitive (google BPS psychology careers).

    TLDR: if you're deciding between psychology or a math/computer based STEM subject, go for the latter. IF your deciding between psychology vs a humanities, social science subject or something like biology/neuroscience, I'd go with psychology. Its also worth considering combining psychology with computer science or statistics.
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    Do a subject you’ll enjoy.

    The reason graduate prospects aren’t good is because people do the subject thinking they’ll have a job on graduation, which isn’t the case. If you want a job in psychology, e.g. clinical or educational, it takes many years.
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    I was once very interested in psychology but after further inspection the earning potential and graduate prospects turned me away after having one of the lowest average pay’s, I’ve moved on towards the engineering sector , good luck
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    (Original post by muizzrahman)
    I was once very interested in psychology but after further inspection the earning potential and graduate prospects turned me away after having one of the lowest average pay’s, I’ve moved on towards the engineering sector , good luck
    Certain sectors of psychology pay extremely well, it’s just hard work getting there. NHS salaries for psychology go up to £100,431 and private practice much more. OP should do their own research and decide whether there is an area of psychology they wish to pursue and if the work needed is worth it.
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    (Original post by A-LJLB)
    Certain sectors of psychology pay extremely well, it’s just hard work getting there. NHS salaries for psychology go up to £100,431 and private practice much more. OP should do their own research and decide whether there is an area of psychology they wish to pursue and if the work needed is worth it.
    I’d say it’s true to say that every subject has areas which pay very well but the level of work needed to reach that level of pay can vary a lot depending on what you study, I don’t deny psychology is interesting but reaching 100k pay with economics for example would be far easier then with psychology. Just my personal input. Enjoying the subject is most important so if OP enjoys something else it’s worth looking into otherwise stick with psychology
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    (Original post by Anagogic)
    I'm so unsure of what to do. Looking back without realising I've always had a fascination for psychology, questioning why we do things, what motivates us exc. But I'm not sure whether or not I should pursue a degree in it mainly due to two things. Firstly it's oversubscribed even though there's many avenues you can take it's pretty poor in terms of graduate prospects. Secondly the perception of the degree, most see it as being pointless even referring to it as a mickey mouse degree. I'm not sure whether to do Psychology which I generally find interesting or to do a degree that's more academically demanding so that it opens more doors and doesn't hurt my ego. I know you shouldn't let the opinions of others influence your decision nor am I knocking psychology because I do value it's importance but I'm afraid most of us are subdued by the consensus of the masses . Any advice would really help thanks =)
    If it is something you find interesting you should go for it! Regardless of what other people say about it. I'm going to university next year for psychology and I always get told it'll take ages for me to find a job, can you read my mind, etc.
    There are a variety of jobs that psychology can take you, such as teaching, marketing, not just jobs such as clinical.
    https://www.prospects.ac.uk/careers-...ree/psychology
    It's all down to you, have a look at the different modules you would be doing if you take the course, see if it interests you and ask other students
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    As with all degrees, what you get out of it depends what you put into it. While certainly if you do Psychology at e.g. Oxbridge, Bath etc then you'll probably have reasonable prospects, that's not the be all and end all. One of the current PhDs in the subject at UCL did his undergrad at London Met - if you apply yourself you can certainly "trade up" from your entry point...
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    (Original post by muizzrahman)
    I’d say it’s true to say that every subject has areas which pay very well but the level of work needed to reach that level of pay can vary a lot depending on what you study, I don’t deny psychology is interesting but reaching 100k pay with economics for example would be far easier then with psychology. Just my personal input. Enjoying the subject is most important so if OP enjoys something else it’s worth looking into otherwise stick with psychology
    I agree. OP mentioned they were interested in psychology and so I just didn’t want them thinking there’s no money in it when it pays very well depending on what sector you work in.
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    (Original post by A-LJLB)
    I agree. OP mentioned they were interested in psychology and so I just didn’t want them thinking there’s no money in it when it pays very well depending on what sector you work in.

    Sure there's money (and more importantly a really rewarding career) in psychology, but there are very few psychologist jobs compared to applicants and psychology students, and many inevitably give up before you can get that amazing 100K salary... not every applicant should apply thinking they can realistically become a psychologist!

    At a good uni any degree will get you through the door for a graduate job if you also have work experience, which is a good thing about psychology.
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    Some good insights and points raised, thanks everyone for responding. I think it's important to do someting you enjoy but wouldn't you also agree it's better to bite the bullet, just so that more doors remain open as most people aren't certain on what they want in life. I'm just worried that psychology is oversubscribed, even if you get a 2.1 or 1st it's no guarantee as so many others do. There's lots of valuable skills but unfortuantely I still don't think it's given the credit it deserves amongst employers. However as everyone here is probably aware that AI and automation are coming and it's one of the least likely professions to be affected by AI. Plus I've looked over the course material and it does naturally fascinate me. It's such a difficult decisions it's that head vs heart conundrum =(
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    (Original post by iammichealjackson)
    Sure there's money (and more importantly a really rewarding career) in psychology, but there are very few psychologist jobs compared to applicants and psychology students, and many inevitably give up before you can get that amazing 100K salary... not every applicant should apply thinking they can realistically become a psychologist!

    At a good uni any degree will get you through the door for a graduate job if you also have work experience, which is a good thing about psychology.
    Trust me, I’m fully aware about psychology and the careers open to those who study it. However if and when you do complete further training such as the DClinPsy, a job is almost guaranteed. You’ve expressed pretty much what I think. Not everyone is cut out for it, and very few realise what it takes to get there.

    If I went with my head, I’d never have picked psychology - it’s a difficult profession to get into. However, I would’ve hated myself for not trying and constantly wondering what if.
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    (Original post by A-LJLB)
    Trust me, I’m fully aware about psychology and the careers open to those who study it. However if and when you do complete further training such as the DClinPsy, a job is almost guaranteed. You’ve expressed pretty much what I think. Not everyone is cut out for it, and very few realise what it takes to get there.

    If I went with my head, I’d never have picked psychology - it’s a difficult profession to get into. However, I would’ve hated myself for not trying and constantly wondering what if.
    Do you know how'd you got about getting into psychological research?. I'm not that interested in becoming a psychologist but the research part is extremely fascinating.
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    As a doctor training in neurology, I work with many clinical psychologists and I can certainly say that psychology is an excellent subject with interesting cases. It is definitely a subject which fascinates me personally - one of the reasons why I chose neurology.
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    (Original post by ecolier)
    As a doctor training in neurology, I work with many clinical psychologists and I can certainly say that psychology is an excellent subject with interesting cases. It is definitely a subject which fascinates me personally - one of the reasons why I chose neurology.
    I'd love to study neurology though no Universities offer it near me and I'm confined due to family reasons. Is it possible to do psychology and then a masters in neuroscience or is neuroscience at undegrad a prerequisite?
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    (Original post by Anagogic)
    I'd love to study neurology though no Universities offer it near me and I'm confined due to family reasons. Is it possible to do psychology and then a masters in neuroscience or is neuroscience at undegrad a prerequisite?
    Neurology is a medical specialty - you would need to do medicine first as an undergraduate. Neuroscience (I would recommend) is another undergraduate degree. Yes it would be able to do the Masters course as a holder of a psychology degree - see https://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/grad...science?wssl=1 for example.

    1. Academic ability
    Proven and potential academic excellence
    Applicants are normally expected to be predicted or have achieved a first-class or strong upper second-class undergraduate degree with honours (or equivalent international qualifications), as a minimum, in any scientific discipline. The department encourages applicants with a physical sciences background, as well as those who have studied a biological subject, such as psychology, biochemistry or neuroscience, at undergraduate level.
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    If you're going for great successes I advice you not to study just one subject you know I mean some fields associated others, such as psychology & Management if you want to really challenge with most social contact jobs like establishing a company or...
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    (Original post by ecolier)
    Neurology is a medical specialty - you would need to do medicine first as an undergraduate. Neuroscience (I would recommend) is another undergraduate degree. Yes it would be able to do the Masters course as a holder of a psychology degree - see https://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/grad...science?wssl=1 for example.

    1. Academic ability
    Proven and potential academic excellence
    Applicants are normally expected to be predicted or have achieved a first-class or strong upper second-class undergraduate degree with honours (or equivalent international qualifications), as a minimum, in any scientific discipline. The department encourages applicants with a physical sciences background, as well as those who have studied a biological subject, such as psychology, biochemistry or neuroscience, at undergraduate level.
    Thanks for the insight, would you say it's better to study psychology at undergrad as it has a wider scope, then specialise in neuroscience at a more advanced level?
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    (Original post by Anagogic)
    Do you know how'd you got about getting into psychological research?. I'm not that interested in becoming a psychologist but the research part is extremely fascinating.
    If you wanted to do psychological research you'd complete a PhD.
 
 
 
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