Anonymous #1
#1
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#1
Hi there,

I am a 2016 Psychology graduate and recently completed a masters in Occupational Psychology in 2017. While studying, I completed 2 internships in fairly good organisations, one in HR another one in a management consultancy. I also had many part-time jobs in retail and hospitality while studying. After completing my masters, 4 months on, I am still struggling to find a job in my field. I've had 3 interviews directly related to the field (Analyst positions) and 4 more interviews that require any graduate degree. Most of the feedback I get are very basic and vague that states I do not have direct experience, or that other candidates have better experience and skill set compared to me, even within entry level roles.

Making Job applications are extremely lengthy and stressful process, not to mention the 3-4 stages that involves assessment day. Its a soul crushing process and I feel that the anxiety and stress is getting the better of me. I did not expect myself to be in this position and now considering to apply for any jobs and take any work I get offered in order to support myself.

Is anyone else in this same position? Any help or advice would be appreciated?
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cheesecakelove
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#2
Report 3 years ago
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Sometimes it takes time to get the job you want, so don't give up and keep trying! Try to make sure everything is as honed as it can be - make sure your CV and covering letter are concise and highlight relevant key skills, keep your knowledge up to date and make sure your interview technique is strong. In the meantime, whilst you are applying for work, you could consider a short term course or volunteering/work experience to boost your CV.
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Lord Asriel
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#3
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If you've done your Psych undergraduate and Occupational Psych masters the risk is that your CV may come across as overly specialist around Occupational Psychology. If you don't have chartership you are stuck in that no mans land between being a specialist fully qualified psychologist and someone who is generic enough to be appealing to grad schemes.

It may be worth visiting your careers service to check your CV and/or your interviewing skills or checking out weaknesses that may come out in assessment centres. For analyst roles, you are going to be up against highly quantitative folk or people with pure business backgrounds and psychology grads often don't stack up well against these for major corporate roles. Having a good understanding of your weaknesses is really helpful when tailoring future applications.
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username4344826
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#4
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I don’t have any advice simply because I am in the exact same position as you. I feel like I’m all alone in this situation, sometimes I forget there are others out there going through the same struggles....I did an undergrad in Psychology and a Masters in Psychological Well Being with Clinical Practise. I have done volunteers work with mental health support workers, Anxiety UK, a youth centre and currently with family support workers.I have applied to what seems to be a thousand psychology roles eg. Assistant psychologist, research assistant, support worker, healthcare assistant etc. I’m lucky if I get feedback from the interviews.I feel that in the process I have developed anxiety and maybe mild depression. It’s hard to keep going sometimes and fight for your dream! I have amended my cv and covering letter a thousand times. I have contacted clinical psychologist and other professionals on linked in. I have written emails and made calls to rehabilitation centres etc - no luck.I don’t know where to turn .... I’m out of ideas.
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marinade
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#5
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I have a hunch what Lord Asriel says is spot on

For analyst roles, you are going to be up against highly quantitative folk or people with pure business backgrounds and psychology grads often don't stack up well against these for major corporate roles. Having a good understanding of your weaknesses is really helpful when tailoring future applications.
Met an awful lot of Psychology students, grads, postgrads. Also many sociologists. What a Psychology person thinks as 'analytical' can come across as very different to what someone in business/economics/non-social sciences regards as 'analytical'.

Also probably right about the occupational psychology looking too specialised.
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Venia
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#6
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Hi all, as a recent psychology graduate with a MSc in Health Psychology, I have had the same luck with you. I have been struggling to get a job interview as an assistant psychologist and I have only had 3 interviews in the past 5 months. After all, I decided to look for a lower band job and a week ago they gave me the a job as a behavioural health care support worker in NHS. Although this is a lower qualification role I accepted it. I believe I will gain the relative experience needed to get the future job I want. I am very grateful that they gave me this opportunity. Don't give up then, try everything, try other routes if needed. The important thing is to make the first step all the best of luck to all of you !
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34534829
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#7
Report 5 months ago
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Hi, wondering if anyone here can help me with tips on how to get a assistant psychologist job? I’ve applied to millions of places but no luck. Any tips on cover letter and cv?
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