username3695838
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Hi,

I'm currently a GCSE student; I have a passion for languages and study Spanish and I have started learning French this October, to sit BOTH exams in May/June 2018. Please excuse any perceived cockiness (as it isn't intended), but I am quite confident with my language abilities and love languages to unbelievable amounts.

For my A-Levels, I would really love to study French, Spanish and Sociology, to go on to do a Modern Languages degree. However, I ask whether you perceive language degrees as worthwhile and well looked upon, or as Mickey Mouse degrees, because if I take the pathway that I am thinking of now, I am particularly concerned of cornering myself into a degree that won't yield many great prospects or put me at any large advantage of jobs other than teaching.

Opinions please??

Thanks
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ajayma
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A modern language degree is an excellent degree to have especially if you want to work overseas or be the overseas representative of companies or be a teacher or translator etc
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okurr123
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Ahh I'm so glad to find someone else also so passionate about languages!! It's good to be confident with your linguistic abilities as it is rare to have linguistic talent (hehe)

I'm currently doing similar A levels to what you're currently thinking of: French, Spanish and Psychology!! Honestly langauges at A Level are even more fun as you go into so much depth and ahhh they're just a-maz-inggg.. I could go on forever about them honestly haha.
But yeah back to your question...yes Modern languages degrees are definitely worth it! I will be applying next year to do French and Spanish at Cambridge Language degrees are so broad and they make you really employable! You can go into professions such as journalism, diplomacy, international law(!) and business. There are so many opportunities as in modern language degrees, you learn a lot of transferrable skills which are really sought after by employers! And not to mention experiencing the amazing year abroad!

When you start your A levels, you could check out some taster courses on languages at different unis, and they'll tell you about what's involved in the course and also about the range of job prospects! I went one at Cambridge and found it super useful!!

Feel free to dm me if you have any questions or want to discuss this more
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TheRuralJuror
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hell yes it is you could easily work as a translator or a teacher in other countries.
I can't believe how easily my bro found an English teaching job in Japan
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username3695838
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(Original post by TheRuralJuror)
hell yes it is you could easily work as a translator or a teacher in other countries.
I can't believe how easily my bro found an English teaching job in Japan
I think the main problem is that i don't particularly want to teach and I'm worried about tying myself to London or Abroad for the rest of my life just so I can have a job!!

(Original post by okurr123)
Ahh I'm so glad to find someone else also so passionate about languages!! It's good to be confident with your linguistic abilities as it is rare to have linguistic talent (hehe)

I'm currently doing similar A levels to what you're currently thinking of: French, Spanish and Psychology!! Honestly langauges at A Level are even more fun as you go into so much depth and ahhh they're just a-maz-inggg.. I could go on forever about them honestly haha.
But yeah back to your question...yes Modern languages degrees are definitely worth it! I will be applying next year to do French and Spanish at Cambridge Language degrees are so broad and they make you really employable! You can go into professions such as journalism, diplomacy, international law(!) and business. There are so many opportunities as in modern language degrees, you learn a lot of transferrable skills which are really sought after by employers! And not to mention experiencing the amazing year abroad!

When you start your A levels, you could check out some taster courses on languages at different unis, and they'll tell you about what's involved in the course and also about the range of job prospects! I went one at Cambridge and found it super useful!!

Feel free to dm me if you have any questions or want to discuss this more
Yes!! I'm year 11 so obviously a year off the stage where you're at and I'm not particularly looking at specific unis, just worried about which path I take - I bet there's a lot more fun to come!!
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David B
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(Original post by TheRuralJuror)
hell yes it is you could easily work as a translator or a teacher in other countries.
I can't believe how easily my bro found an English teaching job in Japan
You generally don't need a language degree to teach English in other countries. Japan is one of them. While it may be beneficial to be proficient in the language (i.e. language degree), you'd be surprised knowing that schools generally don't want you speaking Japanese while working. Although, it will most certainly be beneficial in other areas as you will be living there.
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Herts UG Student Rep
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(Original post by GreedyForTea123)
Hi,

I'm currently a GCSE student; I have a passion for languages and study Spanish and I have started learning French this October, to sit BOTH exams in May/June 2018. Please excuse any perceived cockiness (as it isn't intended), but I am quite confident with my language abilities and love languages to unbelievable amounts.

For my A-Levels, I would really love to study French, Spanish and Sociology, to go on to do a Modern Languages degree. However, I ask whether you perceive language degrees as worthwhile and well looked upon, or as Mickey Mouse degrees, because if I take the pathway that I am thinking of now, I am particularly concerned of cornering myself into a degree that won't yield many great prospects or put me at any large advantage of jobs other than teaching.

Opinions please??

Thanks
Whenever someone asks whether X, Y, Z degree is useful I always direct them to think of the job/lifestyle they want. You said elsewhere in the thread that you don't want to teach--what do you want to do? Become a translator? Work in the government? Be a journalist? Poke around the internet rather than rely on anecdotal evidence like "I know someone who did A job based on B degree!" because at the end of the day, finding a job is based not only what you do academically at Uni, but the experience you find through part-time jobs, volunteering, getting work experience.

Once you see a job/career that catches your eye, see if you can find a job listing for it online. A quick search of "government translator uk" brings up a job from National Career Services. Look at the description--does the day-to-day that it implies appeal to you? Look at the requirements--what kind of degree does it ask of you? Once you have the degree, check out any Uni's degree in that area; poke about in the modules section and see if any of the module sections take your fancy. Think about whether you'd be happy to study this for three whole years, and then during the summers additionally take on work experience in this area (the best way to build up a killer CV and grab a job before you even graduate!). Check out the salary--will you be able to live on this? Is there growth in this area or will this job die out by the time you're 25?

Those are a few starting questions to really gauge whether a degree is right for you--and once you find a job/career you really like, you should delve into that industry as much as you can! Keep your eye on the news for developments in that industry, build a professional twitter with people in that industry, build a LinkedIn profile for the industry news feed they can provide. As you do this, you might come up with more questions about your pathway and your future degree, at which point it might become time to ask a Uni (even if you're not sure which one you want to go), or one of those Twitter contacts, about those questions. Posting in the relevant TSR forum will probably also prove useful!

Finally, a lot of people will say that anything not STEM isn't worth studying, which is a pet peeve of mine.:doh: It's just NOT true. However, anything not STEM will need some extra oomph to improve your employability. There are more than enough people with non-STEM degrees. Find a way to make YOUR degree, and YOUR experience more specific and therefore more useful. I've mentioned part-time jobs, work experience, and volunteering. Those are three key areas that make you instantly more employable than the hundreds of graduates that already have a modern language degree.

It's fantastic you've found a subject you're passionate about, and make sure to hang on to that! It's impossible to really succeed in a degree and subsequent desired field if you don't have the passion!

Good luck
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username3695838
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(Original post by Michelle Bieger)
Whenever someone asks whether X, Y, Z degree is useful I always direct them to think of the job/lifestyle they want. You said elsewhere in the thread that you don't want to teach--what do you want to do? Become a translator? Work in the government? Be a journalist? Poke around the internet rather than rely on anecdotal evidence like "I know someone who did A job based on B degree!" because at the end of the day, finding a job is based not only what you do academically at Uni, but the experience you find through part-time jobs, volunteering, getting work experience.

Once you see a job/career that catches your eye, see if you can find a job listing for it online. A quick search of "government translator uk" brings up a job from National Career Services. Look at the description--does the day-to-day that it implies appeal to you? Look at the requirements--what kind of degree does it ask of you? Once you have the degree, check out any Uni's degree in that area; poke about in the modules section and see if any of the module sections take your fancy. Think about whether you'd be happy to study this for three whole years, and then during the summers additionally take on work experience in this area (the best way to build up a killer CV and grab a job before you even graduate!). Check out the salary--will you be able to live on this? Is there growth in this area or will this job die out by the time you're 25?

Those are a few starting questions to really gauge whether a degree is right for you--and once you find a job/career you really like, you should delve into that industry as much as you can! Keep your eye on the news for developments in that industry, build a professional twitter with people in that industry, build a LinkedIn profile for the industry news feed they can provide. As you do this, you might come up with more questions about your pathway and your future degree, at which point it might become time to ask a Uni (even if you're not sure which one you want to go), or one of those Twitter contacts, about those questions. Posting in the relevant TSR forum will probably also prove useful!

Finally, a lot of people will say that anything not STEM isn't worth studying, which is a pet peeve of mine.:doh: It's just NOT true. However, anything not STEM will need some extra oomph to improve your employability. There are more than enough people with non-STEM degrees. Find a way to make YOUR degree, and YOUR experience more specific and therefore more useful. I've mentioned part-time jobs, work experience, and volunteering. Those are three key areas that make you instantly more employable than the hundreds of graduates that already have a modern language degree.

It's fantastic you've found a subject you're passionate about, and make sure to hang on to that! It's impossible to really succeed in a degree and subsequent desired field if you don't have the passion!

Good luck
Thank you so much!!! (sorry for late reply, was using TSR on my phone and accidentally added you to ignore list and didn't know how to undo it :rolleyes:)

I would love to work for the FCO offices, for example embassy or diplomacy work. I've taken your lead and looked on their website, and it seems I don't even need a languages degree to work with them

It's been really helpful though and now I think I can move on to contacting some of the unis' language courses admissions team and ask about whether my A-level choices would be me in good stead for the courses.

Once again, thanks a bunch!!
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Herts UG Student Rep
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(Original post by GreedyForTea123)
Thank you so much!!! (sorry for late reply, was using TSR on my phone and accidentally added you to ignore list and didn't know how to undo it :rolleyes:)

I would love to work for the FCO offices, for example embassy or diplomacy work. I've taken your lead and looked on their website, and it seems I don't even need a languages degree to work with them

It's been really helpful though and now I think I can move on to contacting some of the unis' language courses admissions team and ask about whether my A-level choices would be me in good stead for the courses.

Once again, thanks a bunch!!
No worries! That sounds like fascinating work--I hope you get what you're looking for from Uni and just remember to always do as much work experience as you can--it always leads to more and new opportunities and it's really the key to finding out what you want from life!

Good luck with everything!
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LlamaLikeEllie
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I'm pretty sure that a lot of language graduates can be employed in areas such as GCHQ, and it shows that you have the skills to learn a language effectively.
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