DeepInTheMeadow
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Hi guys, I'm a Year 12 student studying Maths, F.M, Economics and Spanish, and I'm currently thinking about which university course to take.
I think I would like Economics, but I'm trying to get some more info on what it's like etc. I have a rotten Economics teacher who really does ruin my enjoyment of the lesson, but I definitely don't want her to put me off studying it in the future.

So my question to anyone doing Economics or PPE or whatever:
What is it like studying the course? Modules taken?
What parts do you enjoy? (or hate?)
Would you say you were passionate about Economics? If so, what part of it are you particularly into?
Do you feel like it has real-world relevance? What career are you hoping to go into?

Feel free to answer any (or all) of these questions.

Thanks
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Kevin De Bruyne
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(Original post by DeepInTheMeadow)
Hi guys, I'm a Year 12 student studying Maths, F.M, Economics and Spanish, and I'm currently thinking about which university course to take.
I think I would like Economics, but I'm trying to get some more info on what it's like etc. I have a rotten Economics teacher who really does ruin my enjoyment of the lesson, but I definitely don't want her to put me off studying it in the future.

So my question to anyone doing Economics or PPE or whatever:
What is it like studying the course? Modules taken?
What parts do you enjoy? (or hate?)
Would you say you were passionate about Economics? If so, what part of it are you particularly into?
Do you feel like it has real-world relevance? What career are you hoping to go into?

Feel free to answer any (or all) of these questions.

Thanks
To get the ball rolling...

As a maths student I have studied a lot of stats which isn't bad, just takes lots of practice and econ students don't go into as much detail as maths students anyway for maths and someone doing FM should not have many issues.

I've also taken an econometrics units (the maths of economics, I guess) which econ students take too, which is largely maths, learning how to model and interpret data, the challenging part is the maths to be honest, the economics is just something that comes with it, and this stuff I definitely feel is useful for the real world, although we're using some software I've never heard and can't remember the name of instead of R to run the models but ah well.
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DeepInTheMeadow
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(Original post by Kevin De Bruyne)
To get the ball rolling...

As a maths student I have studied a lot of stats which isn't bad, just takes lots of practice and econ students don't go into as much detail as maths students anyway for maths and someone doing FM should not have many issues.

I've also taken an econometrics units (the maths of economics, I guess) which econ students take too, which is largely maths, learning how to model and interpret data, the challenging part is the maths to be honest, the economics is just something that comes with it, and this stuff I definitely feel is useful for the real world, although we're using some software I've never heard and can't remember the name of instead of R to run the models but ah well.
Thanks for the answer! I'm not really too worried about the 'mathsy-ness', as you say F.M kinda prepares you!

Apart from econometrics, what do you learn about?

More answers and input appreciated
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.ACS.
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(Original post by DeepInTheMeadow)
Hi guys, I'm a Year 12 student studying Maths, F.M, Economics and Spanish, and I'm currently thinking about which university course to take.
I think I would like Economics, but I'm trying to get some more info on what it's like etc. I have a rotten Economics teacher who really does ruin my enjoyment of the lesson, but I definitely don't want her to put me off studying it in the future.

So my question to anyone doing Economics or PPE or whatever:
What is it like studying the course? Modules taken?
What parts do you enjoy? (or hate?)
Would you say you were passionate about Economics? If so, what part of it are you particularly into?
Do you feel like it has real-world relevance? What career are you hoping to go into?

Feel free to answer any (or all) of these questions.

Thanks
Firstly, have a look at the two links in my signature. They're very useful in guiding you on what is covered in economics degrees.

Broadly speaking, though, you'll cover a mix of mathematics, statistics/econometrics, microeconomics, macroeconomics, and then optional modules in say industrial organisation, environmental, health, development, international trade, monetary, etc.

The mathematics modules cover basics of calculus, optimisation, etc. Much of economics boils down to constrained optimisation, whether it be static (as in, for a given time period), or dynamic (spanning over multiple time periods).

Econometrics is essentially mathematical statistics and data analysis. You'll cover a lot of the same topics the mathematics students cover in statistics, but you're restricted to the real space (so no complex numbers), and the assumptions often result in easier proofs, etc. such as assuming the expectation/variance are always bounded (making any measure theoretic probability proof a million times easier than only working under the assumption of a bounded expectation). But then also, you'll look into applying these models etc. to data, and trying to understand when it is best to use certain estimation techniques (ie, ols, mle, gmm, qmle, fe, re, etc.), or when it is appropriate to use certain models (ie, linear or nonlinear, probit/logit, etc.). In essence, it tries to marry mathematical statistics with actually looking at the data and analysing and understanding and modelling the data.

Microeconomics is split into traditional micro, looking at households and firms, and modelling that behaviour, and then also game theory.

Macroeconomics is all about the aggregate economy, either taught in a more old fashioned style or based on micro-foundations, depending on the textbooks used. Essentially here the aim is to look more at the interactions of the economy, and will likely build into how those interactions impact things such as activity (economic growth), the labour market (unemployment), and prices (inflation), and then the possible policy reactions (from government or central banks, ie, primarily fiscal and monetary policy).

Then obviously you have a list of "field" courses, ie, specialisations. One of the links in my signature has an almost exhaustive list of options possible at university and covers the content in each of these in detail.


As for your other questions:
- Everyone will enjoy certain bits and hate other bits. Your like and dislikes change over time. Also, at university, this can be hugely swayed by the lecturer you have.
- I'd say I'm passionate. I did a BSc, MSc, then worked as a professional economist for a number of years, and am now undertakin a PhD in it. Personally, I'm quite into international economics (trade policy, FDI, exchange rates, etc.) and monetary economics (inflation), with a side of applied econometrics (non-linear modelling and spatial modelling).
- Without a doubt I think economics has real-world relevance. Even if you do not become a professional economist, it gives you a better understanding of current affairs, what is going on, when the government lies/misconstrues the truth, when newspapers embellish or exaggerate something, etc. Plus it gives you a great toolkit for a whole host of other careers in finance or related fields (marketing, business management, etc.). Overall, it should make you generally more aware of the world around you.
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Skyewoods
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Alot of differentiation
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DeepInTheMeadow
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(Original post by .ACS.)
Firstly, have a look at the two links in my signature. They're very useful in guiding you on what is covered in economics degrees.

Broadly speaking, though, you'll cover a mix of mathematics, statistics/econometrics, microeconomics, macroeconomics, and then optional modules in say industrial organisation, environmental, health, development, international trade, monetary, etc.

The mathematics modules cover basics of calculus, optimisation, etc. Much of economics boils down to constrained optimisation, whether it be static (as in, for a given time period), or dynamic (spanning over multiple time periods).

Econometrics is essentially mathematical statistics and data analysis. You'll cover a lot of the same topics the mathematics students cover in statistics, but you're restricted to the real space (so no complex numbers), and the assumptions often result in easier proofs, etc. such as assuming the expectation/variance are always bounded (making any measure theoretic probability proof a million times easier than only working under the assumption of a bounded expectation). But then also, you'll look into applying these models etc. to data, and trying to understand when it is best to use certain estimation techniques (ie, ols, mle, gmm, qmle, fe, re, etc.), or when it is appropriate to use certain models (ie, linear or nonlinear, probit/logit, etc.). In essence, it tries to marry mathematical statistics with actually looking at the data and analysing and understanding and modelling the data.

Microeconomics is split into traditional micro, looking at households and firms, and modelling that behaviour, and then also game theory.

Macroeconomics is all about the aggregate economy, either taught in a more old fashioned style or based on micro-foundations, depending on the textbooks used. Essentially here the aim is to look more at the interactions of the economy, and will likely build into how those interactions impact things such as activity (economic growth), the labour market (unemployment), and prices (inflation), and then the possible policy reactions (from government or central banks, ie, primarily fiscal and monetary policy).

Then obviously you have a list of "field" courses, ie, specialisations. One of the links in my signature has an almost exhaustive list of options possible at university and covers the content in each of these in detail.


As for your other questions:
- Everyone will enjoy certain bits and hate other bits. Your like and dislikes change over time. Also, at university, this can be hugely swayed by the lecturer you have.
- I'd say I'm passionate. I did a BSc, MSc, then worked as a professional economist for a number of years, and am now undertakin a PhD in it. Personally, I'm quite into international economics (trade policy, FDI, exchange rates, etc.) and monetary economics (inflation), with a side of applied econometrics (non-linear modelling and spatial modelling).
- Without a doubt I think economics has real-world relevance. Even if you do not become a professional economist, it gives you a better understanding of current affairs, what is going on, when the government lies/misconstrues the truth, when newspapers embellish or exaggerate something, etc. Plus it gives you a great toolkit for a whole host of other careers in finance or related fields (marketing, business management, etc.). Overall, it should make you generally more aware of the world around you.
Thanks for the answer

More opinions also appreciated.
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k.n.h.
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(Original post by .ACS.)
Firstly, have a look at the two links in my signature. They're very useful in guiding you on what is covered in economics degrees.

Broadly speaking, though, you'll cover a mix of mathematics, statistics/econometrics, microeconomics, macroeconomics, and then optional modules in say industrial organisation, environmental, health, development, international trade, monetary, etc.

The mathematics modules cover basics of calculus, optimisation, etc. Much of economics boils down to constrained optimisation, whether it be static (as in, for a given time period), or dynamic (spanning over multiple time periods).

Econometrics is essentially mathematical statistics and data analysis. You'll cover a lot of the same topics the mathematics students cover in statistics, but you're restricted to the real space (so no complex numbers), and the assumptions often result in easier proofs, etc. such as assuming the expectation/variance are always bounded (making any measure theoretic probability proof a million times easier than only working under the assumption of a bounded expectation). But then also, you'll look into applying these models etc. to data, and trying to understand when it is best to use certain estimation techniques (ie, ols, mle, gmm, qmle, fe, re, etc.), or when it is appropriate to use certain models (ie, linear or nonlinear, probit/logit, etc.). In essence, it tries to marry mathematical statistics with actually looking at the data and analysing and understanding and modelling the data.

Microeconomics is split into traditional micro, looking at households and firms, and modelling that behaviour, and then also game theory.

Macroeconomics is all about the aggregate economy, either taught in a more old fashioned style or based on micro-foundations, depending on the textbooks used. Essentially here the aim is to look more at the interactions of the economy, and will likely build into how those interactions impact things such as activity (economic growth), the labour market (unemployment), and prices (inflation), and then the possible policy reactions (from government or central banks, ie, primarily fiscal and monetary policy).

Then obviously you have a list of "field" courses, ie, specialisations. One of the links in my signature has an almost exhaustive list of options possible at university and covers the content in each of these in detail.


As for your other questions:
- Everyone will enjoy certain bits and hate other bits. Your like and dislikes change over time. Also, at university, this can be hugely swayed by the lecturer you have.
- I'd say I'm passionate. I did a BSc, MSc, then worked as a professional economist for a number of years, and am now undertakin a PhD in it. Personally, I'm quite into international economics (trade policy, FDI, exchange rates, etc.) and monetary economics (inflation), with a side of applied econometrics (non-linear modelling and spatial modelling).
- Without a doubt I think economics has real-world relevance. Even if you do not become a professional economist, it gives you a better understanding of current affairs, what is going on, when the government lies/misconstrues the truth, when newspapers embellish or exaggerate something, etc. Plus it gives you a great toolkit for a whole host of other careers in finance or related fields (marketing, business management, etc.). Overall, it should make you generally more aware of the world around you.
I swear I've seen the character in your profile picture before... :hmmmm:
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DeepInTheMeadow
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(Original post by kataali)
I swear I've seen the character in your profile picture before... :hmmmm:
I feel like I have as well :hmmm:

Any more input from Econ uni students?
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.ACS.
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The character is Pocoyo.
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k.n.h.
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(Original post by .acs.)
the character is pocoyo.
ohhhhhhhhhhhhhh
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adhir1
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Could you please put the links that were in your signature in your reply, I can't seem to access it...
(Original post by .ACS.)
Firstly, have a look at the two links in my signature. They're very useful in guiding you on what is covered in economics degrees.

Broadly speaking, though, you'll cover a mix of mathematics, statistics/econometrics, microeconomics, macroeconomics, and then optional modules in say industrial organisation, environmental, health, development, international trade, monetary, etc.

The mathematics modules cover basics of calculus, optimisation, etc. Much of economics boils down to constrained optimisation, whether it be static (as in, for a given time period), or dynamic (spanning over multiple time periods).

Econometrics is essentially mathematical statistics and data analysis. You'll cover a lot of the same topics the mathematics students cover in statistics, but you're restricted to the real space (so no complex numbers), and the assumptions often result in easier proofs, etc. such as assuming the expectation/variance are always bounded (making any measure theoretic probability proof a million times easier than only working under the assumption of a bounded expectation). But then also, you'll look into applying these models etc. to data, and trying to understand when it is best to use certain estimation techniques (ie, ols, mle, gmm, qmle, fe, re, etc.), or when it is appropriate to use certain models (ie, linear or nonlinear, probit/logit, etc.). In essence, it tries to marry mathematical statistics with actually looking at the data and analysing and understanding and modelling the data.

Microeconomics is split into traditional micro, looking at households and firms, and modelling that behaviour, and then also game theory.

Macroeconomics is all about the aggregate economy, either taught in a more old fashioned style or based on micro-foundations, depending on the textbooks used. Essentially here the aim is to look more at the interactions of the economy, and will likely build into how those interactions impact things such as activity (economic growth), the labour market (unemployment), and prices (inflation), and then the possible policy reactions (from government or central banks, ie, primarily fiscal and monetary policy).

Then obviously you have a list of "field" courses, ie, specialisations. One of the links in my signature has an almost exhaustive list of options possible at university and covers the content in each of these in detail.


As for your other questions:
- Everyone will enjoy certain bits and hate other bits. Your like and dislikes change over time. Also, at university, this can be hugely swayed by the lecturer you have.
- I'd say I'm passionate. I did a BSc, MSc, then worked as a professional economist for a number of years, and am now undertakin a PhD in it. Personally, I'm quite into international economics (trade policy, FDI, exchange rates, etc.) and monetary economics (inflation), with a side of applied econometrics (non-linear modelling and spatial modelling).
- Without a doubt I think economics has real-world relevance. Even if you do not become a professional economist, it gives you a better understanding of current affairs, what is going on, when the government lies/misconstrues the truth, when newspapers embellish or exaggerate something, etc. Plus it gives you a great toolkit for a whole host of other careers in finance or related fields (marketing, business management, etc.). Overall, it should make you generally more aware of the world around you.
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