LPC: any value if you don't want to be a solicitor?

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Hayulls
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Hiya,

My employer has asked what training I need in order to be able to head up a legal department. I have good knowledge of the law but my practical knowledge and skills could be improved (e.g. I know unfair dismissal law but I could improve my practical advice by learning the best practical steps for the business to take).

I suggested the LPC as it focuses on practice of the law and gives a Masters in Legal Practice which i feel would help me in my job.

However, I don't intend to do a training period as I don't need to qualify as a solicitor - I don't work at a law firm so my company can't gibe me SRA approved training.

Is the LPC (and Masters) worth it in its own right? Or is it only useful as part of the path to becoming a solicitor?

Thanks
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999tigger
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(Original post by Hayulls)
Hiya,

My employer has asked what training I need in order to be able to head up a legal department. I have good knowledge of the law but my practical knowledge and skills could be improved (e.g. I know unfair dismissal law but I could improve my practical advice by learning the best practical steps for the business to take).

I suggested the LPC as it focuses on practice of the law and gives a Masters in Legal Practice which i feel would help me in my job.

However, I don't intend to do a training period as I don't need to qualify as a solicitor - I don't work at a law firm so my company can't gibe me SRA approved training.

Is the LPC (and Masters) worth it in its own right? Or is it only useful as part of the path to becoming a solicitor?

Thanks
The difference in your case is that you have a need for the knowledge and importantly someone will pay for it. Normally I would say no.

If its not your money then it becomes viable .

LPC will teach you practical knowledge covering things like forms , drafting, procedures and deadlines.

You could et this from a book although you might feel comfier being taught and tested to a standard.

You might also consider CILEX, which lest you specialise in the areas for you.

You might also consider just teaching yourself from books, but as you arent paying. then a course could be better.

Another thing you should be aware of is that starting in 2020 will be a new examination that replaces the LPC called the SQE. Do check out the shelf life of the LPC, but as you say you have no intention of converting it.

https://www.goodschoolsguide.co.uk/d...tor-super-exam

My answer is its a personal choice. It would give you what you useful information. is iy worth the time and someone elses money? On its own and without conversion, then i would say save your money, but you are in a unique situation. Maybe you cna locate a legal course/ masters for inhouse lawyers that has more modules on what you need to know?
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Hayulls
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(Original post by 999tigger)
The difference in your case is that you have a need for the knowledge and importantly someone will pay for it. Normally I would say no.

If its not your money then it becomes viable .

LPC will teach you practical knowledge covering things like forms , drafting, procedures and deadlines.

You could et this from a book although you might feel comfier being taught and tested to a standard.

You might also consider CILEX, which lest you specialise in the areas for you.

You might also consider just teaching yourself from books, but as you arent paying. then a course could be better.

Another thing you should be aware of is that starting in 2020 will be a new examination that replaces the LPC called the SQE. Do check out the shelf life of the LPC, but as you say you have no intention of converting it.

https://www.goodschoolsguide.co.uk/d...tor-super-exam

My answer is its a personal choice. It would give you what you useful information. is iy worth the time and someone elses money? On its own and without conversion, then i would say save your money, but you are in a unique situation. Maybe you cna locate a legal course/ masters for inhouse lawyers that has more modules on what you need to know?
Thank you! I may see if there is a different masters that can be done via distance learning
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Bitesizelaw
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(Original post by Hayulls)
Thank you! I may see if there is a different masters that can be done via distance learning
The LPC is specifically designed for students with with a law degree or Graduate Diploma in Law (which is a conversion course for non-law graduates) so you won't be able to study on this course unless you have either of these qualifications. Becoming a Chartered Legal Executive is something you could consider. All these qualifications can by studied for by Distance Learning but they are hard work and take several years!

If you don't want to qualify as a solicitor, forget the LPC.
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username738914
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I'm just confused as to how someone can head up a legal department without being a qualified lawyer?

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