Physics or English Literature at Uni?!!???!?!?

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bujbjkbjkbhjj
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I'm currently taking Maths, Physics, English Literature, and Computer Science for A levels. I really love both Physics and analysing English literature, but cannot decide on what to do at uni!?
is there any course which can combine my love for both physics and English lit?
any help would be v appreciated!
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Duncan2012
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Any ideas what you might want to do career-wise? I imagine a STEM degree would open more numerate-heavy jobs. Maybe study physics and read 'for fun'?
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BTAnonymous
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Both subjects require deep understanding AND interest to succeed in. Physics is my biased option because it's extremely versatile although I am not so confident about the job prospects of English lit grads although I assume they aren't awful.
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ParkHyungSuk
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(Original post by BTAnonymous)
Both subjects require deep understanding AND interest to succeed in. Physics is my biased option because it's extremely versatile although I am not so confident about the job prospects of English lit grads although I assume they aren't awful.
I know physics can open doors to other sectors like in business and stuff, but what options are there in physics itself?
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muonfrisbee98
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I study physics at uni so can't speak for English Lit, but I would say only go into a physics degree if you really enjoy the subject. It's very interesting but there are quite a few contact hours and labs, as well as lengthy problem sets. It often means that I can't go out as much as others, although it's what you make of it ultimately. It's also a massive step up from A-Level; you really have to understand the topics, it's much less about 'plugging the numbers in'. Honestly though, I'd say just do whichever one you find more pleasure in studying, you'll only do well if you enjoy it
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BTAnonymous
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(Original post by ParkHyungSuk)
I know physics can open doors to other sectors like in business and stuff, but what options are there in physics itself?
Specifically physics related?

From the top of my head I can think of nuclear engineers, aerospace engineers, astrophysicist, medical engineer/technician, possibly petroleum engineering but I'm not too sure on that, materials research and development and then the obvious teacher, lecturer and researcher.
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04MR17
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I've moved this thread into Applications and UCAS

Happy Saturday.:hat2:
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Snufkin
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(Original post by bujbjkbjkbhjj)
I'm currently taking Maths, Physics, English Literature, and Computer Science for A levels. I really love both Physics and analysing English literature, but cannot decide on what to do at uni!?
is there any course which can combine my love for both physics and English lit?
any help would be v appreciated!
I don't think there is a joint honours 'English and Physics' degree, however you might be able to study both subjects in a Liberal Arts and Sciences degree (I know Birmingham has a good one, and there are quite a few of these in the Netherlands). Alternatively, some Scottish universities allow students to take two or three different subjects in the first two years of the degree (these are known as 'outside subjects') before choosing to specialise in one. So, you could in theory apply for BSc Physics or MA* English in Scotland and study both subjects for the first year or so. That said, there is no guarantee that there would be space in the class so you'd be taking a risk.

*in the older Scottish universities, they use MA instead of BA.
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username853993
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(Original post by bujbjkbjkbhjj)
I'm currently taking Maths, Physics, English Literature, and Computer Science for A levels. I really love both Physics and analysing English literature, but cannot decide on what to do at uni!?
is there any course which can combine my love for both physics and English lit?
any help would be v appreciated!
What kind of career do you want to do? neither of those subjects lead to any specific career (other than academia) so you will be applying for general grad roles (though there a few (and I mean a few) roles that ask for a numerate degree)
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InGodiTrust
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Think you should do physics. A lot of people who do eng lit and similar subjects complain about the few contact hours. You could do an actual undergrad degree in physics and get an online degree in eng lit which would be cheaper and could still be at the same uni.
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username853993
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(Original post by BTAnonymous)
Specifically physics related?

From the top of my head I can think of nuclear engineers, aerospace engineers, astrophysicist, medical engineer/technician, possibly petroleum engineering but I'm not too sure on that, materials research and development and then the obvious teacher, lecturer and researcher.
just a quick note: It isnt a good idea to do a physics degree with becoming an engineer in mind, while it does say in many job descriptions for grad engineer roles in aero + mechanical that you can get on with a physics degree it is very hard (for a mixture of reasons) to turn that into a reality.

The most common job roles that people with physics degree enter are (from my observations of friends within my uni and other unis)

- finance (IB, accounting, actuary)
- software dev (quite a popular one)
- teaching
- other general grad roles
- retrain by doing a postgrad masters
- masters/phd in physics/maths


Out of all the physics grads I know that tried to get into engineering without a master in engineering (quite a few people) only 2 managed to do it and that is because they had more engineering based internships under their belt

I know a couple of people who got a place on the nhs stp scheme for the medical physics part too
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username853993
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(Original post by ParkHyungSuk)
I know physics can open doors to other sectors like in business and stuff, but what options are there in physics itself?
The only real roles that use an substantial amount of physics most weeks are research (national labs, post docs etc) and lecturing (combo of teaching uni students and research) roles
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username738914
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(Original post by madmadmax321)
The only real roles that use an substantial amount of physics most weeks are research (national labs, post docs etc) and lecturing (combo of teaching uni students and research) roles
There's also R&D positions within engineering heavy firms (i.e. SpaceX etc)

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username853993
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(Original post by Princepieman)
There's also R&D positions within engineering heavy firms (i.e. SpaceX etc)

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Ah never thought of those but I guess that still comes under research positions, though surely a phd in a specific part of engineering would be required for those roles?
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username738914
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(Original post by madmadmax321)
Ah never thought of those but I guess that still comes under research positions, though surely a phd in a specific part of engineering would be required for those roles?
Well inagine SpaceX, oil companies etc need physicists in petrophysics, geophysics, aerodynamics roles wouldn't they?

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04MR17
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For those debating physics and career paths, it's a very facilitating subject because it is so broad. More career-driven courses in similar fields tend to go down engineering etc. Physics is a subject where you can go onto do lots of things. There's probably some politicians with physics degrees somewhere. Teaching is also an option right now given the shortages in physics teachers.

(Original post by Snufkin)
I don't think there is a joint honours 'English and Physics' degree
There probably is to be honest.:lol:
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Snufkin
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(Original post by 04MR17)
There probably is to be honest.:lol:
Hmm, I did a quick search before I posted and couldn't find any.
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username853993
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(Original post by Princepieman)
Well inagine SpaceX, oil companies etc need physicists in petrophysics, geophysics, aerodynamics roles wouldn't they?

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No idea really, at a blind guess I would of thought that spacex would prefer engineering phds in 'insert relevant specific field' rather than physics but I dont really know with any certainty

I know employers prefer people with geophysics degree specifically for geophysics roles (though how much physics the actual role entails I have no idea)

aerodynamics is mostly maths (modelling fluid dynamics) and engineering I think

The 'problem' (though its not really a problem) is with a physics degree a lot of the physics you learn (electrodynamics, QM, SR, classical mechanics, thermodynamics etc) is either not relevant to anything apart from understanding the way the universe works or is taught from a physics point of view (I have several friends in engineering who have done classical mechanics and thermo and they took a COMPLETELY different approach to the subject with focus on application over understanding). Its a similar thing to maths and physics really, the maths learned in maths is approached in a very different way to the maths in physics
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Snufkin
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I'm not sure how relevant this debate on Engineering vs Physics is to the OP, let's get back on topic? The OP is asking how to choose between two subjects they love (Physics and English).
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BTAnonymous
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(Original post by madmadmax321)
just a quick note: It isnt a good idea to do a physics degree with becoming an engineer in mind, while it does say in many job descriptions for grad engineer roles in aero + mechanical that you can get on with a physics degree it is very hard (for a mixture of reasons) to turn that into a reality.

The most common job roles that people with physics degree enter are (from my observations of friends within my uni and other unis)

- finance (IB, accounting, actuary)
- software dev (quite a popular one)
- teaching
- other general grad roles
- retrain by doing a postgrad masters
- masters/phd in physics/maths


Out of all the physics grads I know that tried to get into engineering without a master in engineering (quite a few people) only 2 managed to do it and that is because they had more engineering based internships under their belt

I know a couple of people who got a place on the nhs stp scheme for the medical physics part too
true but like you said, possible. They are pretty well rounded individuals.
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