Everywhere but US - where to go? Watch

Slothuus
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russream
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well there are lots of uni's around the world that allow IB students into their uni's my school in fact do IB along side A-levels (i'm in my last year of A-level) i think the best thing to do is visit the websites, and get all the prospctuses you can it should help you clear up your mind, and england has lots off good univerities accepting the IB
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Slothuus
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StarsAreFixed
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What about Ireland? Trinity is higher than LSE and St.Andrews in rankings, but behind Oxford and Cambridge as it is massively in debt, because most students don't pay fees. You'd have to though, but you're EU so well, (EDIT- no you aren't. That'd be very unfair if you had to pay the non-EU fees though..do you?) not a whole lot. Trinity is an amazing college, and it's right in the centre of Dublin. Beautiful campus, not too big (it has no room to expand) and great nightlife since it's the centre. Admission requirements are high though, I don't know about IB, and don't expect you to know of the Leaving Cert, but if you know the A-Level system, they all need 4 A's to get in for all of the courses you mentioned, and the top ones.

Trinity has a great reputation for history. I'm taking part of it so I can explain the course layout if you want. History can be taken by itself or combined with something else, you can combine it with Political Studies actually. www.tcd.ie
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pyrogena
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Canada has some great Universities, with reputations to match. McGill for example in Montreal, Dalhousie in Halifax, St Francis Xavier University in Antigonish - if you think you could get a full scholarship, then it's worth investigating.
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bryan
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(Original post by pyrogena)
Canada has some great Universities, with reputations to match. McGill for example in Montreal, Dalhousie in Halifax, St Francis Xavier University in Antigonish - if you think you could get a full scholarship, then it's worth investigating.
for canada, i would only recommend toronto, mcgill, Queen's (Kingston) and UBC.
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Champagne Breakfast
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In Australia you'll want to check out Sydney and Melbourne, they have the best global reputations, and the Australian National University (ANU) in Canberra. Probably best not to bother with the others. Australia would be a lot of fun as you can probably imagine, but a hell of a long distance from Denmark.
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Slothuus
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Slothuus
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hobnob
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(Original post by Slothuus)
Very interesting! The fees are almost equal to the English ones (€4,900/yr). I'm EU citizen (I've lived my entire life in Denmark. Even though I live in Norway for two years now, that shouldn't change anything). The Free Fees system (http://www.tcd.ie/Admissions/admissi.../freefees.html) seems interesting, but how difficult is it to get that?

It doesn't list IB requirements so I'll try to email them and get to know the rough admission req.
How expensive is Dublin to live in?
It probably won't matter in this case, because you've only been there to attend a boarding-school type school (so you'd still be counted as "ordinarily resident" in Denmark). If I were you, though, I'd still double-check just to make sure, since Norway isn't an EU member; if it turned out you're classified as an international, you'd be in for a nasty surprise fees-wise...
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Slothuus
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Slothuus
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hobnob
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(Original post by Slothuus)
It seems like an EU passport is enough for me to get the nice EU fees instead of the overwhelming Overseas fees.
No, an EU passport is not enough, that's the whole point. Normally, you need to have been "ordinarily resident" within the EU for the three years immediately preceding your course. In your case, they might make an exception, since you wouldn't have lived outside the EU (i.e. in Norway) for the past two years if you hadn't attended a boarding school there, but the classifications are rather complicated and confusing, so I'm not entirely sure about that. I'd suggest that you have a look at this guide to tuition fees and then contact someone on the EU team about it.
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toothwort white
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(Original post by Slothuus)
It seems like an EU passport is enough for me to get the nice EU fees instead of the overwhelming Overseas fees.
As hobnob says, an EU passport is definitely not enough for you to get the EU fees. *points to self*
You have to reside in the EEA (sp?) for three years prior to the beginning of your course; so if I were you, I would contact someone about it, be it someone in the EU team or the admissions/international office at unis (perhaps Warwick? seems you're quite interested in them). They would, very likely, send you an questionnaire for you to fill in and then tell you which category you fall into.
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StarsAreFixed
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(Original post by Slothuus)
Very interesting! The fees are almost equal to the English ones (€4,900/yr). I'm EU citizen (I've lived my entire life in Denmark. Even though I live in Norway for two years now, that shouldn't change anything). The Free Fees system (http://www.tcd.ie/Admissions/admissi.../freefees.html) seems interesting, but how difficult is it to get that?

It doesn't list IB requirements so I'll try to email them and get to know the rough admission req.
How expensive is Dublin to live in?

Free Fees are just for Republic Of Ireland students, and the UK as well I believe (because Trinity was a Protestant-only university for a few hundred years and em likes the UK). Dublin is expensive for food, drink and accommodation. But you CAN get food and drink very very cheap in Lidl and Aldi- the german supermarkets. Accommodation would be €450 a month at the least, it can be very cheap elsewhere but because it's the city centre..

Yes you'd really want to email and find out if you're elegible for EU fees. Non-EU fees are very scabby, €35,000 for medicine..

You can get scholarships (such as the Foundation Scholarship in 2nd year, the best one), not really grants as such, and student loans don't really exist here (because of the lack of fees).
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mavoury
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Free Fees are just for Republic Of Ireland students, and the UK as well I believe (because Trinity was a Protestant-only university for a few hundred years and em likes the UK).
UHH thats not true, I'm an Irish student living in Belgium, and I will have no tuition fees if I go to Dublin next year even though I've lived in Belgium for nigh on 11 years. Tution fees are free for all EU students. Living costs on the other hand...

How expensive is Dublin to live in?
Dublin is one of the most expensive cities in Europe, not far behind London. I spend every summer there, and expect to fork out a lot on living costs, especially if you're not going to be living on campus, or in uni accomadation.
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StarsAreFixed
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Tuition fees are not free for all EU students! I've seen the fees handbook thing, EU is a few grand, non-EU is €20,000 and upwards.

Dublin IS very expensive, but wages are brilliant. The best wage I've seen mentioned in the forum here is slightly below minimum wage here- €8.65 (some supermarkets will pay below, but all high-street retail will pay it, and over). So it evens out.
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Slothuus
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StarsAreFixed
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Trinity has been ranked above St Andrews and Edinburgh (this year) ..it'd definitely be lower than McGill and probably slightly lower than Warwick. Trinity is 13th in the UK & ireland rankings, and Warwick was something like 8th. They all have great reputations!
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mavoury
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Tuition fees are not free for all EU students! I've seen the fees handbook thing, EU is a few grand, non-EU is €20,000 and upwards.
Sorry, you are right. There is a difference in "home" and "EU" fees which are a fair few grand, however "The Irish Exchequer will pay tuition fees to the University on behalf of students registered for full-time undergraduate degree programmes (of minimum two years’ duration) who meet ALL the criteria as follows:-
EU nationals with no previous third level attendance who have been resident in an EU Member State for three of the five years prior to entry to university."
http://www.ucd.ie/fees/free_tuition.htm
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