The fine line between introversion and autism

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TSR George
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What is the difference between being an introvert or having autism? Are they related in a way?
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Kasa
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(Original post by The Night King)
What is the difference between being an introvert or having autism? Are they related in a way? To me it seems they could be. I’m asking because I always considered myself to be an introvert, but then realised I might have autism too/instead (although I have no clue if I do or not).
No where near the same thing..
It's a crass stereotype that people with Autism are introverted. It is often not the case.

That's why they call it a spectrum disorder..
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Kasa
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Introversion is a feature universal to anyone
Autism is a personality disorder
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Ninja Squirrel
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(Original post by The Night King)
What is the difference between being an introvert or having autism? Are they related in a way? To me it seems they could be. I’m asking because I always considered myself to be an introvert, but then realised I might have autism too/instead (although I have no clue if I do or not).
Autism, specifically Asperger's is a disability which affects the way an individual understands the world around them and what social norms are. Some may have strict regimented lifestyles were even the smallest change in routine can upset them and throw them off track.

They may not understand how to communicate well with other people, they may want to but they just don't understand how to make a communication flow, the same with making friends.

What they think is normal and correct behaviour people without autism will think is irrational and rude or dysfunctional.

Being an introvert isn't a disability, you often know how to communicate and interact with others but you just choose not to because you'd rather not. You see the world just as everyone else does but you prefer not to step out of your comfort zones, you'd rather just stay familiar with what you're used to.
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username3508100
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Maybe you should see your GP if you're genuinely worried about your behaviour.
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ThePricklyOne
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(Original post by The Night King)
What is the difference between being an introvert or having autism? Are they related in a way? To me it seems they could be. I’m asking because I always considered myself to be an introvert, but then realised I might have autism too/instead (although I have no clue if I do or not).
They are different things.

Introversion is where you like being on your own and doing solitary activities (like reading) rather than hanging out with a crowd of people. You are likely to be shy and unconfident in certain social situations.

Autism is where you have trouble with interpreting normal behaviourial cues (particularly social cues) and have trouble with certain environments (ie. certain light/ sounds/ noise / people). Autistic people can focus (sometimes obsessively on a topic) for a long period of time, and can fail to 'get' the humour in a joke obvious to everyone else. Equally regular folks might not understand why an autistic person's sense of humour. Autistic people can be extroverted or introverted.
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username2981082
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I'm also highly introverted. Never stepped foot in a club. As soon as lectures and seminars are over I either go to the library to study or I go straight home. There isn't really anything wrong with not being social butterfly. Everyone is different. In fact, being happy and comfortable alone is a sign that you're a very independent person and content with yourself.
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username3508100
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I feel exactly the same. It's not weird, or abnormal. People just have different personalities. Never been a fan of huge crowds and getting drunk with a bunch of strangers. I love being alone.
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ThePricklyOne
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There's some overlap between introversion and autism, but interversion is a more of a person's preference (such as liking to be alone than with people), whereas an autism is a behaviourial disorder which on the whole is difficult to change.

I work in an IT office full of autistic guys where someone could spend the whole day talking about the bits of the Last Jedi that no (non autistic) person would notice, and the autistic person would interpret as having some deep meaning for the whole Star Wars saga. Or they'd spend 3 hours throwing the same joke about Pringles around. There's also an obsession with grammar rules and whether certain things are allowed mathematically.

If I sent an email saying there are 37,234 possibilities where a certain 2 halves of a code with appear at each end of a string, I'd get a different reaction depending if the person has autism or not.

Non autistic: wouldn't notice the part about possibilities or find it not even of interest to even comment.

Autistic: would be triggered, and would reply asking for the full working out or send back one of their own.
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CuriouslyCrimson
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There is beauty in solitude, a still peace in silence, simply savouring one's own presence is not a terrible crime one should feel marginalised for. There are others like you.
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CuriouslyCrimson
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Go out searching a little further, and you never know, you might find people who cherish your appreciation for solitude!

Why, thank you ... and Burritos are my favourite! I didn't even know it was you, yet I have bumped into you again so soon
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Punjabichai93
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(Original post by Kasa)
No where near the same thing..
It's a crass stereotype that people with Autism are introverted. It is often not the case.

That's why they call it a spectrum disorder..
Those people on the spectrum with more severe symptoms and who need the most support are usually ignored. People tend to think introverted and cold is the defining autistic trait. Autistic people can be extremely challenging and their autism reaches further than introversion. Like you said it's often not the case at all. Like neurotypical people, some will be introverted and some will not.

I think the biggest issue is that when people typically think of autism, what they're really thinking of is Asperger's syndrome. Everyone else on the spectrum gets ignored.
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crocodile_ears
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From what I've read in this thread, I think the difference between how you feel and what an autistic person might feel is that you're drained by communicating because you don't find it engaging or interesting, whereas an autistic person might get drained because they can't pick up on social cues, get overwhelmed, have problems actually voicing whats in their head, or problems processing what's being said to them. (Of course, take what I'm saying with a grain of salt as I'm not autistic. I just have a close friend who is and we talk about it a lot)

Basically, an introvert is someone who gains energy from spending time alone, whereas an extrovert gains energy from spending time with other people. As we're social creatures, it's good for all of us to be around other people, but introverts might just need quiet time afterwards to recharge. An autistic person might be introverted, but they can definitely be extroverted too, so I don't know if it's really a reliable thing to go

I guess you should also think about what positive things you're seeking when looking into whether or not you're autistic. You mentioned that your friends badger you to hang out or want to spend loads of time on the phone, so I'm guessing that you're line of thinking is that they'd be more respectful as autism feels like a more solid answer. I get that, but you might find it more rewarding to sit down with them and explain how you feel about conversations and how they can work with you so you feel better.

And in regards to being judged for not partying and stuff, you just have to own it and be like "this is what I'm doing". I don't drink because of my anxiety, and people used to be really persistent about wanting me to join in even though it would have been bad for me. Now I try to sound really self-assured and comfortable when I tell people why I don't drink, because people are a lot more respectful and accepting when I sound like I know what I'm about.
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Lemonsponge
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Ganjaweed Rebel What are the differences between a neurotypical introvert and an Autistic introvert?
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Ganjaweed Rebel
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(Original post by Lemonsponge)
Ganjaweed Rebel What are the differences between a neurotypical introvert and an Autistic introvert?
NT Introvert does not enjoy conversation for the sake of conversation, but understands social proprietary and cues whereas an Autistic introvert fails to understand social cues and behaves in an manner which is unusual even if situations where they are engaged and interested.

I'm not even sure where I fit on the spectrum.
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Waldorf67
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(Original post by Kasa)
Introversion is a feature universal to anyone
Autism is a personality disorder
Autism isn’t a personality disorder.
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Waldorf67
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OP, introversion is a personality trait.
It may well be the case that people with autism are more likely to be introverted, but that in no way means autism and introversion are the same? You are comparing a personality characteristic to a disorder. Two entirely separate things.

Almost like saying that a low IQ is the same as Down’s syndrome. Yes those with DS are more likely to have a low IQ, but that in no way means a low IQ and DS are the same...
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Waldorf67
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Those traits apply to many people within the general population.
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Waldorf67
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(Original post by Punjabichai93)
Those people on the spectrum with more severe symptoms and who need the most support are usually ignored. People tend to think introverted and cold is the defining autistic trait. Autistic people can be extremely challenging and their autism reaches further than introversion. Like you said it's often not the case at all. Like neurotypical people, some will be introverted and some will not.

I think the biggest issue is that when people typically think of autism, what they're really thinking of is Asperger's syndrome. Everyone else on the spectrum gets ignored.

Completely agree with the last paragraph. People often think of autistm as the brilliant Sheldon Cooper types, and there is so little awarens of the more severe end of autism, where individuals are non-verbal and experience significant developmental delay.

I mean, the mad thing is that Asperger’s syndrome no longer even exists according to diagnostic criteria. Individuals are just considered part of the spectrum.
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Punjabichai93
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(Original post by Waldorf67)
Completely agree with the last paragraph. People often think of autistm as the brilliant Sheldon Cooper types, and there is so little awarens of the more severe end of autism, where individuals are non-verbal and experience significant developmental delay.

I mean, the mad thing is that Asperger’s syndrome no longer even exists according to diagnostic criteria. Individuals are just considered part of the spectrum.
Yeah exactly they think it's all cute and dandy and I'm like no unfortunately it's not. and then people will look down on those who are on the more severe end because there is so little awareness. When a non verbal, physically challenging, 2-1 autistic child uses public transport people then get offended by their behavior because they don't know what autism really is. Someone once told me 'isn't it just when they ask a lot of questions?'
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