zoesherlock
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I am unsure what I want to do with the rest of my life and have always had an interest in business.I however am unsure what sector of business to go into I love the idea of marketing but am unsure if the prospects of this job is credible and worth going into (mainly because my parents majorly disagree). I am currently studying Maths, History and Photography and have no education in business and feel like this might prove a major difficulty for me in the future.However I am uncertain whether i want to specialise in my degree or do a more general degree. I also don't know how respected these are, many people have told me not to do a business degree as it is not widely respected and generally has negative stigma attached and are for people who aren't as bright. For me, without sounding like a complete snob, believe I am capable of a more intellectual degree and want a degree that reflects my capabilities but also gives me employ-ability. Any Advise?
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sexilexi
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Study economics, it’s a much more reputable field, and get an MBA after getting some work experience.
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claireestelle
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(Original post by zoesherlock)
I am unsure what I want to do with the rest of my life and have always had an interest in business.I however am unsure what sector of business to go into I love the idea of marketing but am unsure if the prospects of this job is credible and worth going into (mainly because my parents majorly disagree). I am currently studying Maths, History and Photography and have no education in business and feel like this might prove a major difficulty for me in the future.However I am uncertain whether i want to specialise in my degree or do a more general degree. I also don't know how respected these are, many people have told me not to do a business degree as it is not widely respected and generally has negative stigma attached and are for people who aren't as bright. For me, without sounding like a complete snob, believe I am capable of a more intellectual degree and want a degree that reflects my capabilities but also gives me employ-ability. Any Advise?
Look into the stats as to which jobs people have gone into with specific business degrees and more general ones, that might give you an idea as to whether it is a good option for you.
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zoesherlock
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(Original post by tinycharlie)
Study economics, it’s a much more reputable field, and get an MBA after getting some work experience.
A few people have mentioned Economics, but again I have never studied this and never had much interest in this sector and find it rather boring. I understand the need for basic understanding of the economy, but I couldn't imagine doing 3 years on the subject and generally don't think It would prepare me for a career in business unless I wanted to become an economist or something in that area which I know for sure I don't. However my issue is that is the main intellectual option I can think of and one I don't particularly want to take.
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sexilexi
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Employers in finance, management, etc... value economics degrees more. Nonetheless, if you have no interest in economics, I wonder why you’d even want to study business. A degree such as economics and management could also be a good alternative, but a business degree in itself is not very focused or as difficult to achieve.
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zoesherlock
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(Original post by tinycharlie)
Employers in finance, management, etc... value economics degrees more. Nonetheless, if you have no interest in economics, I wonder why you’d even want to study business. A degree such as economics and management could also be a good alternative, but a business degree in itself is not very focused or as difficult to achieve.
An economics degree joined with say history or management might be worth dong as it would break up the subject, it's definitely worth looking into.
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sexilexi
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I agree and I think that it would be just as good if you took something like Economics and Management. As a result, you’ll get an excellent degree, while also having a focus in management which can include a wide variety of things which you might be very interesting. I know oxford, KCL have economics and management degrees
(Original post by zoesherlock)
An economics degree joined with say history or management might be worth dong as it would break up the subject, it's definitely worth looking into.
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username738914
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(Original post by tinycharlie)
Employers in finance, management, etc... value economics degrees more. Nonetheless, if you have no interest in economics, I wonder why you’d even want to study business. A degree such as economics and management could also be a good alternative, but a business degree in itself is not very focused or as difficult to achieve.
First of all, they don't. Econ is no more useful to finance than business/management is..

Second of all, OP should study what they find interesting not a degree that people 'say' is better. It's their 3-4 years of life, not someone else's.




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zoesherlock
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(Original post by Princepieman)
First of all, they don't. Econ is no more useful to finance than business/management is..

Second of all, OP should study what they find interesting not a degree that people 'say' is better. It's their 3-4 years of life, not someone else's.




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I agree, however if I am spending all that money on university I want it to be worthwhile and not a complete waste of money and time.
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username738914
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(Original post by zoesherlock)
I agree, however if I am spending all that money on university I want it to be worthwhile and not a complete waste of money and time.
The only way you are absolutely certain to make your university career a waste of time is by doing nothing aside from studying. If you go through 3-4 years of Econ and Management or Business without making the most of your time at uni, you'll have nothing to show for it.

Pick the subject you enjoy the most (as long as it is an acceptable subject - aka not meme studies), do well in that subject but most importantly make use of all the opportunities university has to offer. Join and lead societies. Volunteer. Socialise and network. Seek out work experience. Maybe start something (a business or society).

That's what will get you on the right footing for a good job not whether you studied Econ or Business.

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University of Bath
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(Original post by zoesherlock)
I am unsure what I want to do with the rest of my life and have always had an interest in business.I however am unsure what sector of business to go into I love the idea of marketing but am unsure if the prospects of this job is credible and worth going into (mainly because my parents majorly disagree). I am currently studying Maths, History and Photography and have no education in business and feel like this might prove a major difficulty for me in the future.However I am uncertain whether i want to specialise in my degree or do a more general degree. I also don't know how respected these are, many people have told me not to do a business degree as it is not widely respected and generally has negative stigma attached and are for people who aren't as bright. For me, without sounding like a complete snob, believe I am capable of a more intellectual degree and want a degree that reflects my capabilities but also gives me employ-ability. Any Advise?
Hey!

I'm currently studying Management at Bath and I was in the exact same position as you when applying! I didn't know what I wanted to study or what I planned to do with a business degree.

I had never studied Business before as I did Maths, Psychology and English Language A-Level. I think you will find it useful to have studied both numerical and essay subjects as I have definitely been challenged in both areas, and Bath actually prefer a broad range of subjects in applications. In my experience it has not put me at a disadvantage - I don't actually know anyone who studied Business A-Level as many students are international and completed the International Baccalaureate.

I chose Management instead of specialising in International Management or Management with Marketing because I wanted to leave my options open. At Bath, all three courses have a common first year so there is the opportunity to change courses after first year (although in my experience, International Management was too full to permit any additional students).

The big differentiator of Bath is the placement year as this really helps you to develop your employability. I have already perfected my CV, written cover letters and had mock interviews and, most importantly for me, it has forced me to think about what I want to do after my degree before I get to the end of final year.

The course at Bath is very well respected and large employers take on Bath students for the placement year such as Accenture, Loreal, Morgan Stanley, Unilever, BOSCH and more! Also, the course is very relevant to real life as lots of our projects are group assessed and we do quite a few presentations.

If I can be of any more help - just ask!

Alice
2nd Year Management - University of Bath
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pmc:producer
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(Original post by zoesherlock)
I am unsure what I want to do with the rest of my life and have always had an interest in business.I however am unsure what sector of business to go into I love the idea of marketing but am unsure if the prospects of this job is credible and worth going into (mainly because my parents majorly disagree). I am currently studying Maths, History and Photography and have no education in business and feel like this might prove a major difficulty for me in the future.However I am uncertain whether i want to specialise in my degree or do a more general degree. I also don't know how respected these are, many people have told me not to do a business degree as it is not widely respected and generally has negative stigma attached and are for people who aren't as bright. For me, without sounding like a complete snob, believe I am capable of a more intellectual degree and want a degree that reflects my capabilities but also gives me employ-ability. Any Advise?
Whoever is telling you Business degrees aren't respected are either a) STEM students on TSR who don't actually know what employers think. Or b) making wrong assumptions based on their own perceptions.

The truth is that when you go in to industry, nobody cares what you studied (or where actually). It almost never comes up in conversation and you quickly realize that work experience trumps everything else. You also face the stark reality that 'a degree is a degree'...

Of course you need in the door first - decent uni & grades are mandatory - internships/work exp/studying abroad is the deal breaker.

Some industries are different of course...

(Original post by tinycharlie)
Study economics, it’s a much more reputable field, and get an MBA after getting some work experience.

(Original post by tinycharlie)
Employers in finance, management, etc... value economics degrees more. Nonetheless, if you have no interest in economics, I wonder why you’d even want to study business. A degree such as economics and management could also be a good alternative, but a business degree in itself is not very focused or as difficult to achieve.

OP - totally disregard this posters comments... He/she clearly has very limited knowledge (if any).


Economics and business are completely different degrees - you can have an interest in business without an interest in econ. Econ degrees have very little to do with business functions. Yes you'll learn analytical capabilities with econ which will enable you to go on and understand certain business functions quicker... But econ isn't even close to supply & value chain analysis, commercial strategy or finance for that matter (in practical terms). Point being, if you want to see what business is like, learning about post-keynesian economics isn't the way.

Employers in 'management' certainly don't value econ over management (I'd be more inclined to argue they don't care what your degree is in).

Business degrees can be as specialist as you like if you go to a decent uni. Both me and my friend in the same Business & Management course ended up having very different experiences; mines was heavily focused on strategy/project management/finance with 2 years of politics and econ alongside it - his was all about non-profits and the third sector.

This poster also suggests you do a degree - then pay for an MBA. What he doesn't tell you is that any MBA that'll genuinely add value will cost at least £70K (including living, excluding opportunity costs).

This poster is the epitome of what's wrong with students asking students questions in certain circumstances... He/she quite obviously doesn't know about the things he's giving you advice about.

For context, I'm a Management graduate 1st year out of uni. I work for one of the biggest global companies in my industry and earn c.£35K with some fantastic percs - shares, a very generous pension scheme, private health & dental etc.

Some of my colleagues are from Oxbridge, some are from Aston. Some studied Physics, some studied History. Nobody cares...

TLDR - the poster giving advice is wrong. Study whatever you want to study and if you still fancy a career in business, go for it.
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sexilexi
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(Original post by pmc:producer)
Whoever is telling you Business degrees aren't respected are either a) STEM students on TSR who don't actually know what employers think. Or b) making wrong assumptions based on their own perceptions.

The truth is that when you go in to industry, nobody cares what you studied (or where actually). It almost never comes up in conversation and you quickly realize that work experience trumps everything else. You also face the stark reality that 'a degree is a degree'...

Of course you need in the door first - decent uni & grades are mandatory - internships/work exp/studying abroad is the deal breaker.

Some industries are different of course...







OP - totally disregard this posters comments... He/she clearly has very limited knowledge (if any).


Economics and business are completely different degrees - you can have an interest in business without an interest in econ. Econ degrees have very little to do with business functions. Yes you'll learn analytical capabilities with econ which will enable you to go on and understand certain business functions quicker... But econ isn't even close to supply & value chain analysis, commercial strategy or finance for that matter (in practical terms). Point being, if you want to see what business is like, learning about post-keynesian economics isn't the way.

Employers in 'management' certainly don't value econ over management (I'd be more inclined to argue they don't care what your degree is in).

Business degrees can be as specialist as you like if you go to a decent uni. Both me and my friend in the same Business & Management course ended up having very different experiences; mines was heavily focused on strategy/project management/finance with 2 years of politics and econ alongside it - his was all about non-profits and the third sector.

This poster also suggests you do a degree - then pay for an MBA. What he doesn't tell you is that any MBA that'll genuinely add value will cost at least £70K (including living, excluding opportunity costs).

This poster is the epitome of what's wrong with students asking students questions in certain circumstances... He/she quite obviously doesn't know about the things he's giving you advice about.

For context, I'm a Management graduate 1st year out of uni. I work for one of the biggest global companies in my industry and earn c.£35K with some fantastic percs - shares, a very generous pension scheme, private health & dental etc.

Some of my colleagues are from Oxbridge, some are from Aston. Some studied Physics, some studied History. Nobody cares...

TLDR - the poster giving advice is wrong. Study whatever you want to study and if you still fancy a career in business, go for it.
Sure, but the matter of the fact is that economics majors will make more money than management majors and that’s a given fact.
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pmc:producer
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(Original post by tinycharlie)
Sure, but the matter of the fact is that economics majors will make more money than management majors and that’s a given fact.
(Original post by tinycharlie)
Sure, but the matter of the fact is that economics majors will make more money than management majors and that’s a given fact.
I'm glad we agree that you know nothing.

And the OP wasn't concerned about money, she was concerned about business...

Economics graduates earn more if they go on to become econonists (unlikely) or move in to consulting/finance... If they move in to business, they earn the same as business grads - the inverse is true too.
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sexilexi
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(Original post by pmc:producer)
I'm glad we agree that you know nothing.

And the OP wasn't concerned about money, she was concerned about business...

Economics graduates earn more if they go on to become econonists (unlikely) or move in to consulting/finance... If they move in to business, they earn the same as business grads - the inverse is true too.
So you agree that economics majors earn more money? Case in point, economics majors are more valuable.
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pmc:producer
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(Original post by tinycharlie)
So you agree that economics majors earn more money? Case in point, economics majors are more valuable.
I agree that if you have a deree in Economics and move in to a consulting, IB or similar vs Business students who end up in a commercial role - yes, you'll earn more money.

However, if you have a business degree and end up in consulting for example, you'll earn the same. Albeit you're more likely to be interested in consulting/IB with an econ degree (especially as soon as you realise you'll most likely never be an economist). It'll also be arguably easier with an econ degree for those industries.

Here's the point you're totally missing though; the OP doesn't want those industries, and isn't comparing starting salaries... She's interested in a commercial career - and whether your degree is in econ or drama, the money is the same as it's industry specific.

Good luck passing any quant degree if you can't grasp that point.

And for a final time, thanks for highlighting your absolute lack of subject knowledge. At least this way no future readers with the same Qs will take notice of your nonsense posts.
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BTAnonymous
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have you looked into apprenticeships
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sexilexi
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(Original post by pmc:producer)
I agree that if you have a deree in Economics and move in to a consulting, IB or similar vs Business students who end up in a commercial role - yes, you'll earn more money.

However, if you have a business degree and end up in consulting for example, you'll earn the same. Albeit you're more likely to be interested in consulting/IB with an econ degree (especially as soon as you realise you'll most likely never be an economist). It'll also be arguably easier with an econ degree for those industries.

Here's the point you're totally missing though; the OP doesn't want those industries, and isn't comparing starting salaries... She's interested in a commercial career - and whether your degree is in econ or drama, the money is the same as it's industry specific.

Good luck passing any quant degree if you can't grasp that point.

And for a final time, thanks for highlighting your absolute lack of subject knowledge. At least this way no future readers with the same Qs will take notice of your nonsense posts.
Bahahaha, this made me laugh. So an economics degree is more valuable, can land you the same jobs as in business, and yet they should take a business degree according to you? I'm not sure what's going through your head, but since you have a degree in management, you probably want to justify it somehow. There is a good reason reason why you are working in your current job with people who studied history and physics as a degree in management... isn't reputable to say the least.
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pmc:producer
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(Original post by tinycharlie)
Bahahaha, this made me laugh. So an economics degree is more valuable, can land you the same jobs as in business, and yet they should take a business degree according to you? I'm not sure what's going through your head, but since you have a degree in management, you probably want to justify it somehow. There is a good reason reason why you are working in your current job with people who studied history and physics as a degree in management... isn't reputable to say the least.

Again, you've totally missed the point. Here it is again - slowly this time so you can follow.

A) Economics is a very dull subject unless i) you like it or ii) you think a 3/4 year degree is worth the outcome at the end (a role in IB or consulting - where your uni will matter more than your degree anyway). The industries econ graduates typically move in to earn more than typical business sectors. But plenty of business grads go on to be consultants, analysts, project managers and the like (and earn the same)

B) The OP has an interest in business - not where the real pay gay is IB (and lets face it, econ degrees aren't valuable for their 'economist' salaries - any degree can make it here too with varying levels of difficulty)

C) In any industry; consulting, commercial, even IB you'll find graduates of all subjects - from history to comp sci - that doesn't make them less valuable, it suggests what people at work know - employers don't care about a degree subject in isolation.

D) I work everyday with a guy who studied PPE at Oxford, again - you're grossly mistaken if you think it devalues his education because he works with people in the same role who studied history.

E) When you enter the world of work, you'll realize how absurdly stupid you sound here. You've let a student form guide your perception of the world of work and what employers look for. You've totally overlooked the OPs concerns in lieu of this drive towards an econ degree that'll leave her absolutely no further forward when it comes to knowing which area of business she wants to move in to.

And with that, I'm done debating you clearly have very limited knowledge about. I felt it important to come back to your points here because there are other sheep like you who consume this drivel on here. It's important to debunk this nonsense.
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pmc:producer
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Ffs - just had a quick look and a) you're not even at Uni and b) you have a thread titled 'ideas for making loads of money' hahaha

I think we're done here.
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