How can we solve the NHS crisis? Watch

FightToWin
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#1
Of course this has been in the news for years now.. Longer waiting times, lack of beds, people being encouraged to keep sick elderly people at home.. It's indisputable there is a crisis.

However, I'll say this, and I know it won't go down well, but I feel it needs to be said. If you dialled the Accident & Emergency line, and waited in a room for 4 hours, it was never an emergency and you should have dialled 111.

Secondly, there are far too many ******** calls, and that also needs to be addressed. My dad works as a paramedic and right before the Christmas period got a number of calls out and assessed that the patient could be treated at home over Christmas and the family would just rather say to their kids that their gran had to spend Christmas in hospital than actually keep gran at home in pain in front of the kids, on christmas day. Which I understand. But still don't accept when they are probably aware that there is a lack of beds for people who don't actually need them. What I absolutely detest is how they'd then complain about paramedics when they refuse to take them to hospital after clearly assessing, with 30 years more experience than the family, that this patient DOES NOT need hospital treatment, and take the paramedics name to complain about him/her to the NHS. ****ing disgusting. Paramedics choose to be paramedics to save people's lives, not to act as a taxi driver who only gives lifts to a hospital.

Rant over. My only point is, the reason there's a crisis is because demand is currently over supply and it's quite clear now that more money is not going to be given to the NHS to increase supply. So the solution is to decrease demand. Reduce the number of phone calls coming in, take pressure off the call centres and reduce the number of admissions to people who don't need admissions. There are ways around it still.

Two suggestions:

1: Add a third tier to the emergency categories, in between emergencies and non-emergencies. That way A&E can be reserved for people who need immediate admission, i.e people who are actually dying. Heart attacks, internal bleeding, organ failure etc. Add the second tier for things like broken bones, wounds, anything that's not life threatening basically. And 111 for queries or just anything you know can hold off for a bit.

2: More first aid available for access to the general public. We should have first aid kits within easy access of a road. Because accidents happen on roads. And more people should be signing up for first aid training. I don't know what your excuse is for not being first aid trained. If someone gets hit by a car and is lying in the road dying people are more than happy to stand there gawping, filming and rubber necking. Maybe actually do something a bit more useful.

Plus think about it this way: It's impossible to tell how much a hospital costs to build straight away, but it would not be cheap. We're talking at least £300 million. A good first aid kit costs £200. First aid training costs £1,200 inc VAT for a group of 12. So the £300 million you could use to build a hospital could instead buy 1.5 million first aid kits OR training for 250,000 people. Meeting halfway, 500,000 first aid kits, training for 150,000 people... sounds way better than a hospital. Yes, there are disadvantages. Yes, it won't be just as easy as that. But it sounds way better than building a hospital in one area to me.

Oh and to throw in a third suggestion start charging people for wasting paramedic's time and charge people who need an ambulance because they're too drunk to look after themselves. That will put a stop to it and will stop two problems at once. The NHS isn't a "free service" just because you don't want to drive someone to hospital or because you know they'll have your back if you want to go out. It's time to start taking responsibility for a national service so many are taking for granted. Good day.
2
reply
ByEeek
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 year ago
#2
The problem lies with the fact that our dear government has cut just about every social service to the bone. So elderly people can't be released from hospital because all the care homes have been shut down. Similarly, all the mental health services have been shut down so mental heath issues now fall on A+E. In my area there used to be a walk-in clinic (now shut) so if you cut yourself needing stitches, you can't go to the doctor because they just issue prescriptions so it is A+E. Drug and alcohol issues are now the domain of the police where once there were services to deal with that and similarly, homelessness is increasingly in the domain of the NHS and the police.

What the government need to realise is that if you want to save money, cutting services is not necessarily the way to do it as we are finding out.
1
reply
FightToWin
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#3
(Original post by ByEeek)
The problem lies with the fact that our dear government has cut just about every social service to the bone. So elderly people can't be released from hospital because all the care homes have been shut down. Similarly, all the mental health services have been shut down so mental heath issues now fall on A+E. In my area there used to be a walk-in clinic (now shut) so if you cut yourself needing stitches, you can't go to the doctor because they just issue prescriptions so it is A+E. Drug and alcohol issues are now the domain of the police where once there were services to deal with that and similarly, homelessness is increasingly in the domain of the NHS and the police.

What the government need to realise is that if you want to save money, cutting services is not necessarily the way to do it as we are finding out.
Absolutely. There's some points I didn't raise there that go further than the NHS crisis.

Sometimes I'm lost for words as to how we got ourselves into this mess.
0
reply
AperfectBalance
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 year ago
#4
Raise the prices of medication, paying less than £10 a month for unlimited prescriptions is insane, even if you have £10,000 it only costs less than £10.
Even if you raise it by a bit you would gain a lot of money
0
reply
snowman77
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#5
Report 1 year ago
#5
If there's anything I've learned about people, it's that they are generally very selfish and need strong dis-incentives not to do something.

We need to start handing out hefty fines and penalties for people who dial 999, who could quite easily dial 111. Just relying on people's goodwill to not dial because it uses up a bed for someone who genuinely needs it is not enough. People will be selfish when they want to be. They do not want to make their life more difficult just out of "goodwill".

As for the growing elderly population, I'm not sure how to deal with that. Certainly not allowing assisted dying was a big mistake, especially when the NHS is already in crisis, why are we allowing people who want to die (and their families who also agree to them dying) to continue to live?
1
reply
Drewski
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#6
Report 1 year ago
#6
(Original post by FightToWin)
More first aid available for access to the general public. We should have first aid kits within easy access of a road. Because accidents happen on roads. And more people should be signing up for first aid training. I don't know what your excuse is for not being first aid trained. If someone gets hit by a car and is lying in the road dying people are more than happy to stand there gawping, filming and rubber necking. Maybe actually do something a bit more useful.
What on earth do you think is actually in the average first aid kit?

Have you ever actually been on a first aid course? Unless you're actually a paramedic there's pretty much nothing you'll be able to do for someone who really has been hit by a car and is lying in the road dying.

(Original post by AperfectBalance)
Raise the prices of medication, paying less than £10 a month for unlimited prescriptions is insane, even if you have £10,000 it only costs less than £10.
Even if you raise it by a bit you would gain a lot of money
Through no fault of my own I require medication every day to maintain my health. The market value of the pills I need is approximately £120/month. Why, as a full time worker who's paying into the tax system, shouldn't I be able to benefit from the subsidised cost of that medication and the NHS' ability to buy in bulk?
3
reply
Duncan2012
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#7
Report 1 year ago
#7
In no order of importance or scale:

People getting older
Lack of care home places
Health tourism
Over prescription of generic drugs
Inefficient processes
Expensive PFI contracts
People going to A&E for non-emergencies
People going to GPs for colds
Self-induced injury/disease (drink/diet/exercise related)

Solve all those and we all win.
0
reply
SMEGGGY
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#8
Report 1 year ago
#8
Throwing money is Not the answer. So much waste, hospital food is wasted on a grand scale I was asking the nurses, they said it can't be eaten by staff, reheated, or given to homeless charities. It's insane. Government, J **** is useless as are previous health secretaries.
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
reply
hannah00
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#9
Report 1 year ago
#9
Stop paying for IVF and abortions
1
reply
AperfectBalance
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#10
Report 1 year ago
#10
(Original post by Drewski)
What on earth do you think is actually in the average first aid kit?

Have you ever actually been on a first aid course? Unless you're actually a paramedic there's pretty much nothing you'll be able to do for someone who really has been hit by a car and is lying in the road dying.



Through no fault of my own I require medication every day to maintain my health. The market value of the pills I need is approximately £120/month. Why, as a full time worker who's paying into the tax system, shouldn't I be able to benefit from the subsidised cost of that medication and the NHS' ability to buy in bulk?
I am sure you would be able to pay £15 a month or something around that mark, or we could have something that is on a scale system so anying from £X to £Y costs Z and so on.

having even £5 added on (a price that everyone can pay) would make a big difference
0
reply
FightToWin
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#11
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#11
(Original post by snowman77)
If there's anything I've learned about people, it's that they are generally very selfish and need strong dis-incentives not to do something.

We need to start handing out hefty fines and penalties for people who dial 999, who could quite easily dial 111. Just relying on people's goodwill to not dial because it uses up a bed for someone who genuinely needs it is not enough. People will be selfish when they want to be. They do not want to make their life more difficult just out of "goodwill".

As for the growing elderly population, I'm not sure how to deal with that. Certainly not allowing assisted dying was a big mistake, especially when the NHS is already in crisis, why are we allowing people who want to die (and their families who also agree to them dying) to continue to live?
I agree with this 100%. And I can't remember who I heard this from, but they made a great point that when our pets get old and start suffering we get them put to sleep, yet do that to a human, which is also classed as an animal, and they're prosecuted?? I'd want to choose when I can die, and how, and choose not to suffer any longer.

(Original post by Drewski)
What on earth do you think is actually in the average first aid kit?

Have you ever actually been on a first aid course? Unless you're actually a paramedic there's pretty much nothing you'll be able to do for someone who really has been hit by a car and is lying in the road dying.
Not enough to stop someone who's been hit by a car at speed and is dying, obviously. THAT'S when you'd dial 999.

Getting hit by a car not at speed and suffering minor injuries isn't an emergency, but people will dial 999 and send an ambulance out because there's no other access to any first aid on a road therefore 999 is the only option to get them any kind of treatment.. which is why I suggested having first aid near roads and encourage people to carry kits in their cars.
0
reply
Drewski
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#12
Report 1 year ago
#12
(Original post by AperfectBalance)
I am sure you would be able to pay £15 a month or something around that mark, or we could have something that is on a scale system so anying from £X to £Y costs Z and so on.

having even £5 added on (a price that everyone can pay) would make a big difference
How about you get Wales, Scotland and NI to pay anything first, rather than just making NHS England patients pay more for the same things?
1
reply
AperfectBalance
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#13
Report 1 year ago
#13
(Original post by Drewski)
How about you get Wales, Scotland and NI to pay anything first, rather than just making NHS England patients pay more for the same things?
Wow, I never knew about that, you are 100% right, they should be paying for it as much as everyone else is in the UK
0
reply
username3674016
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#14
Report 1 year ago
#14
(Original post by Duncan2012)
In no order of importance or scale:

People getting older
Lack of care home places
Health tourism
Over prescription of generic drugs
Inefficient processes
Expensive PFI contracts
People going to A&E for non-emergencies
People going to GPs for colds
Self-induced injury/disease (drink/diet/exercise related)

Solve all those and we all win.
How exactly do you suppose the problem of an aging population can be solved? Mandatory euthanasia, perhaps?
0
reply
CountBrandenburg
  • Political Ambassador
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#15
Report 1 year ago
#15
I think there’s only a certain amount of stress a Public Health Service can take, and I believe to solve the NHS crisis, expanding the private sector more should in theory reduce the stress being exerted on the organisation ( let’s be honest there’s not exactly a whole lot of other options). I’m of course not suggesting doing away with the NHS, it’s important that it’s always there as an option for the less well off members of society, but to decrease the demand there should be an incentive for better care in areas and ways to divert patients away from resorting to the NHS. In that way, the most important part of the NHS, that is the emergency services, will be able to operate more efficiently
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
1
reply
anosmianAcrimony
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#16
Report 1 year ago
#16
(Original post by AperfectBalance)
Raise the prices of medication, paying less than £10 a month for unlimited prescriptions is insane, even if you have £10,000 it only costs less than £10.
Even if you raise it by a bit you would gain a lot of money
I suspect that the prices of medication are determined quite thoughtfully to save as much money as possible already. Paying less than £10 a month for unlimited prescriptions does sound really generous, but in some cases people on the edge of poverty might not otherwise buy that medicine. And if they don't, they might for example wind up in A&E needing triple bypass surgery and costing the NHS a lot more money than if it had just shelled out the extra 50p a month for their medication. I bet some very clever people have put a lot of complicated maths and statistics into finding AperfectBalance.
2
reply
303Pharma
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#17
Report 1 year ago
#17
How can we solve the NHS crisis
Privatisation.
0
reply
TheJohnM
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#18
Report 1 year ago
#18
Pretend it doesn't exist?
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
reply
AperfectBalance
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#19
Report 1 year ago
#19
(Original post by anosmianAcrimony)
I suspect that the prices of medication are determined quite thoughtfully to save as much money as possible already. Paying less than £10 a month for unlimited prescriptions does sound really generous, but in some cases people on the edge of poverty might not otherwise buy that medicine. And if they don't, they might for example wind up in A&E needing triple bypass surgery and costing the NHS a lot more money than if it had just shelled out the extra 50p a month for their medication. I bet some very clever people have put a lot of complicated maths and statistics into finding AperfectBalance.
There are schemes if you cannot afford medicine or are struggling to afford medicine so this worry is negated, having a tiered system could also be somewhat based on income
0
reply
anosmianAcrimony
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#20
Report 1 year ago
#20
(Original post by AperfectBalance)
There are schemes if you cannot afford medicine or are struggling to afford medicine so this worry is negated, having a tiered system could also be somewhat based on income
There are schemes, but it's easier and quicker and better for peoples' immediate health if they don't have to use them and can just get the medicine they need as soon as possible. And the easier and quicker access to medicine is, the fewer visits to A&E people will make, so as I explained it balances itself to some extent.

I'm all for the creation of a tiered system. There's no reason why the super-rich should have their medicine subsidised.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Are you tempted to change your firm university choice now or on A-level results day?

Yes, I'll try and go to a uni higher up the league tables (131)
18.82%
Yes, there is a uni that I prefer and I'll fit in better (70)
10.06%
No I am happy with my course choice (397)
57.04%
I'm using Clearing when I have my exam results (98)
14.08%

Watched Threads

View All