what is the relationship between intelligence and creativity

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student10172
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Hi,I have to discuss the relationship between intelligence and creativity however I have trouble about what should be mentioned in the essayAny help will be great!!!!undergrad student
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303Pharma
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Not sure they're actually linked. People can be book-smart, but not very creative with their IQ. People can be amazingly creative, but, well dumb as ****. I don't think they necessarily go hand in glove. Great when it does, but never guaranteed.
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HateOCR
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Im not sure if there is a strong correlation but id assume that smarter people are more creative. Seems quite logical to think that.
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garcia1683
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Hello there!

It's something along the lines that HateOCR suggests: Creativity requires both a powerful cognitive apparatus (i.e. what Spearman terms "g" or what Cattell names "fluid intelligence”) as well as a special type of personality (i.e. as in an “unconventional” sort of personality). That’s where the link lies: creativity emerges from these factors working together, and hence is known as an “integrative” factor, because it, along with emotional intelligence and cognitive styles, bridges the gap between cognitive intelligence and personality.

On the one hand, fluid intelligence (i.e. the type of intelligence measured by IQ tests) is a must because it allows formal thinking, that is, logical-rational scientific thought, with all its abstraction, hypotheses, deductive/inductive reasoning, and so on. The point of creativity is to create a solution that is innovative and original and has societal value (as per Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi’s definition), and to do that you must first mentally test different possibilities and understand the degree of success they may bring about.

On the other hand, the need for an unconventional personality is self-evident: you are trying to produce something that is unique in order to solve a problem in a way that it has not been previously solved; therefore, you need to think outside the box, and the way to do that is to have a personality that is not affected by social constraints. Ironically, creativity correlates moderately strongly with Eysenck’s “psychoticism” type, which means that creative people tend to break rules and defy authority.

Creativity is, in fact, an important part of Sternberg’s triarchic theory of intelligence. According to him, people’s intelligence is made up of three different domains:

- Analytical, which is what’s taught in school and has to do with logical reasoning. It’s good for solving problems that a very clearly defined and which admit one single solution only.

- Practical, which allows people to interact with their environments in an adaptive manner.

- Creative, which stands between analytic (internal, cognitive) and practical (external, hands-on) and, again, bridges the gap: it allows you to use your analytical intelligence in order to solve innovative problems in an original manner. It is particularly useful to resolve situations which are not so clearly cut-out and which admit several solutions.

The combination of these three (in the right proportions depending on the task at hand) leads individuals to what Sternberg calls “successful intelligence,” which according to him leads to success not in the traditional sense (i.e. academically or professionally), but in the sense of making sure that you are comfortably adjusted to the conditions of your particular environment.

Hope this helps!

Best,

Marc
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