Which uni is most dog friendly? What are your experiences as a dog owner and student? Watch

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I would suggest trying to find flat mates who are responsible and have previously owned dogs. If you live with people who have different schedules to you then you’ll be fine to leave the dog at home with trusted housemates. Older students, postgrads or PhD students might well be happy to share a home with a dog and are likely to offer you a more relaxed and stable homelife than you’d find in halls.

Another option might be lodging. If you can find a suitable host family (maybe even one with other dogs that your dog gets along with) then again you’re looking at a supportive home for both of you that doesn’t require you taking your dog to lectures or returning home too often during the day.
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Joinedup
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Did know a chap who brought a dog to uni.

He fetched it up in years 2 and 3 after spending year 1 without a dog in halls - so he'd got a group of dog tolerant mates to move into private housing with. Even for dog loving people I think it's quite a big ask to want to move a dog in if you're not already good mates with them.

also worth noting it was quite an old dog that liked small walks and sleeping a lot... not a young bouncy one.
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Doones
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(Original post by doodle_333)
It still wouldn't be a suitable environment in most halls for a dog. IMO it would be very unfair to the dog.
I don't necessarily disagree. But such adjustments are required to accommodate those who need them. The issue in this case is wether the OPs dog is recognised as a necessary adjustment. According to the link I and another poster raised, it possibly won't be.

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threeportdrift
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(Original post by Hrolfr)
Alright, would that be different if I had him registered as an Emotional Support Animal? I know for a fact that it's illegal in the UK for an ESA to be banned from places where other dogs are, like any flat, stores, restaurants etc. when I've gone to visit with him, I've told the person at the front of the restaurant that he's an ESA (which is true, in France he is registered) and they've allowed us in without further issue. Of course it's always preferable to be more amicable than to say 'if you don't allow this I'll sue you' but if I have to go that route I certainly will.
You've got little or no chance of living in university accommodation and making the adjustments you want. An ESA registered animal is not the same as an Assistance registered animal and the full access rights only belong to Assistance animals, any allowance for the other is a matter for the organisation.
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numeracyhelp
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Hi Hrolfr!

I recommend taking a year out. It helps give you all sorts of relevant life-experience. I'd say, don't feel you have to go to university, but don't be put off by the difficulty regarding your dog. Decide what you really want, and then you'll find ways to do it. If traditional study turns out to be impossible then there is always the Open University or another distance-learning option. They often require a bit of contact time, occasionally, but you can make arrangements for your dog to be left alone or with a trusted person on those occasions if it turns out you simply can't bring him.

We have a dog we wanted to register as a support animal for my son, who has an intellectual disability. We found we couldn't register her in the UK. She is a Pets As Therapy dog like the one mentioned by another respondant to your post. We sometimes find places break their "no dog" rule when they see how charming our dog is.

I think you should be looking to bring your dog in to lectures. That's his job. I'm pretty sure you will have to rely on getting special permission from a university by way of reasonable adjustment, but you can't take it as a legal entitlement, because companion dogs for depression aren't legally counted as assistance dogs in the UK. Funny, I had had the impression that in the USA they were more likely to be recognised. I believe that the Americans with Disability Act recognises service dogs including those for depression.

Edinburgh and Colchester are both lovely towns. I've studied at five different universities and can assure you that what you put in is more important than the international status of a place, and that it's supremely important to feel supported by the powers-that-be in your department. So I suggest you check out the universities you're interested in, especially the ones where you could initially stay with family: Edinburgh and the University of Essex (which has a campus in Colchester). Try to get in touch with their disability support service and ask them directly. They can contact the relevant departments and libraries and so on. They might also be able to find you a grant to top up your accommodation budget in order to pay for dog-friendly accommodation.

I agree with you that shared living-accommodation with a dog is problematic. It's possible to arrange it but it's a hassle. Sometimes a house gets divided into self-contained flats with one or more flats opening directly into a private fenced garden of its own. That would work for you if you could only find something within your budget and where the landlord is okay with it and maybe a flatmate who loves dogs: lots of "ifs".

You might try Buckingham University, because they're private and might be more open-minded. Middlesex University have a campus where I bring my dog quite frequently, but I've never tried bringing her into their buildings. I loved studying at Durham - www.dur.ac.uk - and one of their undergraduate colleges is St Cuthbert's Society whose members mostly stay in self-catering accommodation they can arrange themselves. Durham is more affordable than London or Edinburgh, especially if you don't mind living a few miles out from town, in a nearby village, and then you can walk your dog in each day, through sunshine, wind, rain and snow, and bring him to lectures well exercised. I found the pastoral care was good, and there was a nice atmosphere. But of course you'd have to get the department to agree to your bringing the dog in to lectures. I believe it's worth a try. Universities want to show they're supporting diversity in their student population.
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Middlesex University
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(Original post by Hrolfr)
Hello, I will be 18 in a couple of days and live in France. I was raised in Northumberland, quite close to Newcastle, but we moved to Brittany (Bretagne/Breizh in French/Breton) just about 5 years ago and haven't looked back. It's a great place and I probably want to continue to live in France as a working adult, but I'm almost certain that I'd like to attend university in the UK as the French university system is very odd and although I speak French, it's easier for me to do more complex things in English.

I have a Caniche Royal, a full sized poodle, he's groomed in a very practical way and people don't think he's a poodle because they expect poodles to look ridiculous. He's extremely well trained dog, because he's a poodle he doesn't aggravate allergies, and he and I go everywhere together. He could be classified as an emotional support dog because we got him for me on recommendation from the psychologist for my depression nearly 3 years ago, but he isn't on the registry in the UK because I don't live in Britain and he's only been a few times. Anywhere that I move to, he's coming with me, so it's important that whatever university that I attend is dog friendly altogether, not just in halls but especially in halls. If I have my own room that I can lock, he can be left alone for up to 90 minute intervals whilst I go to a lecture but any more and he'll become bored, and if the room is shared I have to take him with me because the only others that I trust to be alone with him are my parents and siblings, he could easily be stolen or abused in someone else's care and I won't allow that to happen.


I can live with my grandad or in the flat under my brother and sister in law's house if I study in Colchester or Edinburgh respectively, and my parents said that they can give me £100-£150 per week for housing if I need to get a flat but I don't know if single flats exist at that price and a share means trusting a stranger to be alone with my dog, and being expected to put the needs of someone that I don't know or care about over the needs of that which I love most. If I can take my dog to class if he's registered as an Emotional Support Dog, that's a different story.

I'm taking a gap year to figure things out and I might not go to university because it might be too much of a hassle and traumatic experience for my dog, and there is a career that I'm very interested in that only requires an apprenticeship, either here or in Britain.


So, what's your experience with bringing your dog to university? What is the most dog friendly university?


Please don't tell me your opinion about how I feel about my dog, it won't change anything. I have to say that because I asked a similar question on Reddit and got called a freak, of course Reddit is mostly Americans so I should know better than to expect politeness or civilised behaviour, but the internet is a mean place and unfortunately many young British people are increasingly Americanised so I feel the need to clarify. Hope your new year is going well thus far and thank you for answering.


P.S. I've no idea how to post photos or I would, sorry

Good morning,

I am studying at working at Middlesex University
I have asked if it is possible to bring a dog to our university and you can bring it but it has to be registered with one of the seven charities which are listed with Assistance Dogs UK (ADUK).
What course would you like to study?

Have a great day
Ludovica
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YaliaV
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(Original post by doodle_333)
It still wouldn't be a suitable environment in most halls for a dog. IMO it would be very unfair to the dog.
Yes. Even if it's possible, it probably won't be fair on the dog. There's a lot of noise and disruption in student accommodation and that would stress the dog out.Having a dog will also put a huge leash on you, as you won't be as free to do other things and will always have to consider your pet. You won't be able to make trips etc
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numeracyhelp
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(Original post by Middlesex University)
Good morning,

I am studying at working at Middlesex University
I have asked if it is possible to bring a dog to our university and you can bring it but it has to be registered with one of the seven charities which are listed with Assistance Dogs UK (ADUK).
Have a great day
Ludovica
Hi Ludovica, all the eight charities listed under ADUK support client groups with physical or sensory disabilities, or autism, or health issues such as diabetes or epilepsy. As yet, there is no way in the UK to get an assistance dog formally registered if the dog is a psychological support dog for a person with depression. Perhaps you could enquire whether Middlesex University would make an exception and allow the OP's well-trained assistance dog to come to lectures despite not being registered with ADUK? Middlesex are very good about accessibility and equality, generally. A lot of students live near the Hendon campus in shared houses and flats. There is parkland nearby. The OP might be able to find suitable accommodation, although it'd be a bit of a challenge: perhaps lodging with a dog-owning family such as mine.
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Middlesex University
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(Original post by numeracyhelp)
Hi Ludovica, all the eight charities listed under ADUK support client groups with physical or sensory disabilities, or autism, or health issues such as diabetes or epilepsy. As yet, there is no way in the UK to get an assistance dog formally registered if the dog is a psychological support dog for a person with depression. Perhaps you could enquire whether Middlesex University would make an exception and allow the OP's well-trained assistance dog to come to lectures despite not being registered with ADUK? Middlesex are very good about accessibility and equality, generally. A lot of students live near the Hendon campus in shared houses and flats. There is parkland nearby. The OP might be able to find suitable accommodation, although it'd be a bit of a challenge: perhaps lodging with a dog-owning family such as mine.

Hello,

Unfortunately the dog has to be registered under the ADUK support.
Yeah, I guess the best way would be to lodge with a dog-owning family.
Sorry, I cannot do more than that as it is the policy.

Have a good day!
Ludovica
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gr8wizard10
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ditch the k9
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matmed
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Look for private accommodation on rightmove, SpareRoom and gumtree. Even if landlords advertise their property as no pets allowed, write/ speak to them personally, explain your dog is very well behaved and you may have to put down a higher deposit for the property. I doubt University halls will allow a dog or if it would be the best place for a dog. I found sheffield to be a dog friendly place and you should be able to find a private accommodation that will let you have your dog! Once you make friends at uni, you could also get ask then if they'd be happy to live with you and the dog from 2nd year onwards. You'll have to look harder for suitable places but it isn't impossible. With regard to looking after the dog during the day, if you manage to find a place within 20/30 mins away from your uni, you can pop in at any time you have a gap in your schedule!
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Doones
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(Original post by matmed)
Look for private accommodation on rightmove, SpareRoom and gumtree. Even if landlords advertise their property as no pets allowed, write/ speak to them personally, explain your dog is very well behaved and you may have to put down a higher deposit for the property. I doubt University halls will allow a dog or if it would be the best place for a dog. I found sheffield to be a dog friendly place and you should be able to find a private accommodation that will let you have your dog! Once you make friends at uni, you could also get ask then if they'd be happy to live with you and the dog from 2nd year onwards. You'll have to look harder for suitable places but it isn't impossible. With regard to looking after the dog during the day, if you manage to find a place within 20/30 mins away from your uni, you can pop in at any time you have a gap in your schedule!
And who looks after the dog for the 40/60 mins travel (there and back) plus lecture time, tutorials, library time, etc ?
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Good bloke
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(Original post by gr8wizard10)
ditch the k9
The OP might find that difficult but will certainly need to prepare for the time after graduation when they enter the world of work in which such dogs are unheard of and extremely unlikely to be welcome.
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(Original post by Doonesbury)
And who looks after the dog for the 40/60 mins travel (there and back) plus lecture time, tutorials, library time, etc ?
Quite. Thinking back to my childhood, I remember our neighbours two doors down got a dog and left it at home all day. It howled for hours at a time. It was not a happy bunny.
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numeracyhelp
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(Original post by YaliaV)
Yes. Even if it's possible, it probably won't be fair on the dog. There's a lot of noise and disruption in student accommodation and that would stress the dog out.Having a dog will also put a huge leash on you, as you won't be as free to do other things and will always have to consider your pet. You won't be able to make trips etc
It depends a lot on the dog.
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Doones
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(Original post by numeracyhelp)
It depends a lot on the dog.
OP specifically says their dog can be left for 90 minutes max.

That's too short to be a practical proposition at university.

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matmed
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(Original post by Doonesbury)
And who looks after the dog for the 40/60 mins travel (there and back) plus lecture time, tutorials, library time, etc ?
There will obviously have to be some sacrifices made. Many lectures are recorded, put online these days and if so, study time can be done from home. I'm not saying it will be easy, it will not be a traditional student lifestyle for sure. If OP is committed to the dog and can't be without it then it would be difficult but doable. If the dog has separation anxiety issues then that will have to be sorted out first of course. If it is a normal, sociable dog that is okay to be left for around 4 hours at a time then it is doable. You can also hire a dog walker or sign up to borrow my doggy for help with dog care. You will need to make sure you have finances for that though.
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jonathanemptage
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(Original post by Hrolfr)
Hello, I will be 18 in a couple of days and live in France. I was raised in Northumberland, quite close to Newcastle, but we moved to Brittany (Bretagne/Breizh in French/Breton) just about 5 years ago and haven't looked back. It's a great place and I probably want to continue to live in France as a working adult, but I'm almost certain that I'd like to attend university in the UK as the French university system is very odd and although I speak French, it's easier for me to do more complex things in English.

I have a Caniche Royal, a full sized poodle, he's groomed in a very practical way and people don't think he's a poodle because they expect poodles to look ridiculous. He's extremely well trained dog, because he's a poodle he doesn't aggravate allergies, and he and I go everywhere together. He could be classified as an emotional support dog because we got him for me on recommendation from the psychologist for my depression nearly 3 years ago, but he isn't on the registry in the UK because I don't live in Britain and he's only been a few times. Anywhere that I move to, he's coming with me, so it's important that whatever university that I attend is dog friendly altogether, not just in halls but especially in halls. If I have my own room that I can lock, he can be left alone for up to 90 minute intervals whilst I go to a lecture but any more and he'll become bored, and if the room is shared I have to take him with me because the only others that I trust to be alone with him are my parents and siblings, he could easily be stolen or abused in someone else's care and I won't allow that to happen.


I can live with my grandad or in the flat under my brother and sister in law's house if I study in Colchester or Edinburgh respectively, and my parents said that they can give me £100-£150 per week for housing if I need to get a flat but I don't know if single flats exist at that price and a share means trusting a stranger to be alone with my dog, and being expected to put the needs of someone that I don't know or care about over the needs of that which I love most. If I can take my dog to class if he's registered as an Emotional Support Dog, that's a different story.

I'm taking a gap year to figure things out and I might not go to university because it might be too much of a hassle and traumatic experience for my dog, and there is a career that I'm very interested in that only requires an apprenticeship, either here or in Britain.


So, what's your experience with bringing your dog to university? What is the most dog friendly university?


Please don't tell me your opinion about how I feel about my dog, it won't change anything. I have to say that because I asked a similar question on Reddit and got called a freak, of course Reddit is mostly Americans so I should know better than to expect politeness or civilised behaviour, but the internet is a mean place and unfortunately many young British people are increasingly Americanised so I feel the need to clarify. Hope your new year is going well thus far and thank you for answering.


P.S. I've no idea how to post photos or I would, sorry
Most unis do not allow pets in halls of course they do have blind students and they allow seeing eye dogs so if you can get it registered as an assistance dog here then they might allow it but it would have to be in a house share for the dogs own good halls would stress it the rooms are smaller than jail cells and that would mean sharing the possibility of anyone abusing you dog however is very low.
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subtle spyglass
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(Original post by YaliaV)
Yes. Even if it's possible, it probably won't be fair on the dog. There's a lot of noise and disruption in student accommodation and that would stress the dog out.Having a dog will also put a huge leash on you, as you won't be as free to do other things and will always have to consider your pet. You won't be able to make trips etc

Hello,

As to what will 'stress a dog out', and what is 'fair on the dog' - remember, dogs, like humans, are all individuals! Some things might stress all dogs out- such as aggression, inappropriate confinement, etc.; and are unacceptable.
However, my dog ( the sociable, confident wee shetland collie) actively enjoys being surrounded by students. There's one particularly busy building where she wags her tail and heads straight toward it, every time I pass by it. She's also good at waiting for me to say, "Say Hello", before she approaches a student, who obviously wants to make contact. Therefore, she doesn't approach a person who may not like dogs. But some other dogs may indeed be 'stressed out' in a crowded environment.

A really good person to discuss this issue with, is a good , caring and experienced veterinary surgeon who knows your dog. Our principal vet. sets much value on treating every animal as an individual; and avoiding stress is high on the list of her concerns ( and all the other vets and nurses who work in her team ). She knows the personality of each her animal patients very well indeed. So, if I'm concerned/ unsure about what may be stressful for my own particular dog, I ask the vet, or the senior veterinary nurse. They're more than happy to discuss this - (and it doesn't usually involve any fee, unless they think a full consultation is necessary in the circumstances).

Like your previous respondent, my dog is not an assistance dog, but she is a Pets as Therapy (eg in hospitals , schools) so I can't say she 'should' be admitted to my Uni. But, the 'no dog rule' is (unofficially) not strictly enforced. She's a calm, friendly, confident little dog who is very happy being on campus.

I appreciate that this is just one element in this discussion. But, as another respondent has already said, the age, character and personality of the dog are relevant issues. And a good vet. will advise on this.
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YaliaV
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(Original post by subtle spyglass)
Hello,

As to what will 'stress a dog out', and what is 'fair on the dog' - remember, dogs, like humans, are all individuals! Some things might stress all dogs out- such as aggression, inappropriate confinement, etc.; and are unacceptable.
However, my dog ( the sociable, confident wee shetland collie) actively enjoys being surrounded by students. There's one particularly busy building where she wags her tail and heads straight toward it, every time I pass by it. She's also good at waiting for me to say, "Say Hello", before she approaches a student, who obviously wants to make contact. Therefore, she doesn't approach a person who may not like dogs. But some other dogs may indeed be 'stressed out' in a crowded environment.

A really good person to discuss this issue with, is a good , caring and experienced veterinary surgeon who knows your dog. Our principal vet. sets much value on treating every animal as an individual; and avoiding stress is high on the list of her concerns ( and all the other vets and nurses who work in her team ). She knows the personality of each her animal patients very well indeed. So, if I'm concerned/ unsure about what may be stressful for my own particular dog, I ask the vet, or the senior veterinary nurse. They're more than happy to discuss this - (and it doesn't usually involve any fee, unless they think a full consultation is necessary in the circumstances).

Like your previous respondent, my dog is not an assistance dog, but she is a Pets as Therapy (eg in hospitals , schools) so I can't say she 'should' be admitted to my Uni. But, the 'no dog rule' is (unofficially) not strictly enforced. She's a calm, friendly, confident little dog who is very happy being on campus.

I appreciate that this is just one element in this discussion. But, as another respondent has already said, the age, character and personality of the dog are relevant issues. And a good vet. will advise on this.
Well, I hope it works out for you either way. I know how great dogs can be at lifting your mood!
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