How is an Oxbridge degree viewed in the American job market? Watch

Flambeau
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Heyo again!

I am just about to accept my offer to Oxford my MSc in Education but my one last hesitation is that various people have told me that my job prospects in America would be significantly higher with a degree from Harvard, UPenn, etc, instead.

But I find it hard to believe that any employer worth their salt would look at an Oxford degree with anything other than favorability and would, in general, see the degree as absolutely on par with an Ivy degree. I even think/hope that it could be an advantage, seeing as an Oxford degree in America is comparatively rare and would give me international experience.

But am I being naive, or are these people misguided?

Keep in mind that I am already an American citizen and graduated with a BA from a top 20 uni in America. I am likely going to return to teach in America after graduation, but on the other hand, I would not be at ALL opposed to teaching in the UK, provided I do go to Oxford and am able to get a tier 2 visa at a sponsoring school after.
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Doones
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(Original post by Flambeau)
Heyo again!

I am just about to accept my offer to Oxford my MSc in Education but my one last hesitation is that various people have told me that my job prospects in America would be significantly higher with a degree from Harvard, UPenn, etc, instead.

But I find it hard to believe that any employer worth their salt would look at an Oxford degree with anything other than favorability and would, in general, see the degree as absolutely on par with an Ivy degree. I even think/hope that it could be an advantage, seeing as an Oxford degree in America is comparatively rare and would give me international experience.

But am I being naive, or are these people misguided?

Keep in mind that I am already an American citizen and graduated with a BA from a top 20 uni in America. I am likely going to return to teach in America after graduation, but on the other hand, I would not be at ALL opposed to teaching in the UK, provided I do go to Oxford and am able to get a tier 2 visa at a sponsoring school after.
I suspect you will need the ask some employers in the US.

What level do you plan to teach?

Stupid question from me (again I'm no expert on this) but don't you usually need a PGCE to teach?


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Blue_Cow
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(Original post by Doonesbury)
I suspect you will need the ask some employers in the US.

What level do you plan to teach?

Stupid question from me (again I'm no expert on this) but don't you usually need a PGCE to teach?


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I thought you could teach in academies without holding a PGCE/QTS status?
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Doones
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(Original post by Blue_Cow)
Can you not teach in academies without a PGCE/QTS etc?
Honestly no idea...

04MR17 ?
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Blue_Cow
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(Original post by Doonesbury)
Honestly no idea...

04MR17 ?
I just realised how **** my wording was... Gonna edit that
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04MR17
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(Original post by Blue_Cow)
I thought you could teach in academies without holding a PGCE/QTS status?
(Original post by Doonesbury)
Honestly no idea...

04MR17 ?
Pretty sure academics must be QTS accredited.:yep: Not sure whether it's a PGCE as such, might be a shortened version or a slightly different kind of thing.:dontknow:

toronto353, if you're around you probably know best.

(Original post by Blue_Cow)
I just realised how **** my wording was... Gonna edit that
:lol:
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04MR17
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It's also just occurred to me that this thread may become like that Dad's army sketch, where more and more people will be tagged until we finally get an answer.:laugh:
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bigchecks
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I'm not an employer, but I am an American high school senior (California). From my limited experience, I would say that an Oxbridge degree is on par with an Ivy degree. And you're right on the international experience and rarity thing; most employers would see this as very attractive imo. That being said... and again this is very subjective... a Harvard/Yale/Princeton/MIT degree (and Stanford to some extent if you're on the West Coast) may be perceived as being SLIGHTLY more prestigious. Oxbridge is definitely more "special" here tho to those (almost everyone) who know what it is.
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04MR17
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(Original post by Flambeau)
Heyo again!

I am just about to accept my offer to Oxford my MSc in Education but my one last hesitation is that various people have told me that my job prospects in America would be significantly higher with a degree from Harvard, UPenn, etc, instead.

But I find it hard to believe that any employer worth their salt would look at an Oxford degree with anything other than favorability and would, in general, see the degree as absolutely on par with an Ivy degree. I even think/hope that it could be an advantage, seeing as an Oxford degree in America is comparatively rare and would give me international experience.

But am I being naive, or are these people misguided?

Keep in mind that I am already an American citizen and graduated with a BA from a top 20 uni in America. I am likely going to return to teach in America after graduation, but on the other hand, I would not be at ALL opposed to teaching in the UK, provided I do go to Oxford and am able to get a tier 2 visa at a sponsoring school after.
To OP specifically, delighted to see you doing an MSc in Education. (education is a great thing to study:innocent:)

I'd agree with you that an Oxford masters won't look shabby on your CV at all! Yes Harvard might be regarded by some people (it's all subjective) as equivalent or perhaps better than Oxford, but I can't imagine many other US universities would be able to make that claim.

I'm not saying the people advising you are being dishonest in the slightest, but if you know them then they might want to keep you in the US, because they might miss you if you come and join us over here.
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Flambeau
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Thanks for the replies so far! I'd like to hear as many opinions and perspectives as possible, so keep 'em coming!

To answer the PGCE/QTS question, it is possible to teach at independent schools in the UK without QTS. I've looked into the credentials of teachers at some of the top independent schools in England, and at many of them, only a couple teachers have QTS, while the rest have either just a Bachelor's or a Master's. A friend of mine helps to confirm this, as he teaches English at Eton and has a BA and MA in Literature but never did a PGCE or anything to get QTS.

I'm not sure if the same holds true for academies, though I wouldn't be surprised if it was.

That being said, I know it's much easier to get a teaching job in the UK with QTS (and probably to make better money too), and I'm not opposed to doing so after my Master's, though I would definitely try to do it through the "salaried training" route.

Ideally, if I go to Oxford and fall in love with England and decide I want to stay there, I would try to get a tier 2 visa at a sponsoring school that would take me on as a salaried teaching trainee on the way to gaining QTS.
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toronto353
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(Original post by 04MR17)
Pretty sure academics must be QTS accredited.:yep: Not sure whether it's a PGCE as such, might be a shortened version or a slightly different kind of thing.:dontknow:

toronto353, if you're around you probably know best.

:lol:
In terms of teaching, the rules regarding QTS have got become more relaxed in recent years and as I understand it, it is currently possible to teach at independent schools and academies without having a PGCE or QTS. However, it's worth bearing in mind that this is at the discretion of each employer, meaning that while one academy or independent school may allow you to teach without either a PGCE or QTS, not every one will and OP may find it hard to move into another job without having either. Of course, there are other routes into teaching which will grant you QTS, such as Teach First. These might be worth looking into as QTS is worth having for flexibility in your career; plus, as I understand it, state schools don't hire people without QTS. The idea that QTS means that you earn more is only partially true. Independent schools do generally give a higher salary, but I've heard of instances on academies screwing teachers without QTS over by using it as an excuse to pay them less.

Academics, however, don't have to have QTS; I teach at a university and don't. However, increasingly these days, employers want academics to complete the PGCHE and so I'm now working towards this to ensure that my employability prospects are higher.
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04MR17
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(Original post by toronto353)
In terms of teaching, the rules regarding QTS have got become more relaxed in recent years and as I understand it, it is currently possible to teach at independent schools and academies without having a PGCE or QTS. However, it's worth bearing in mind that this is at the discretion of each employer, meaning that while one academy or independent school may allow you to teach without either a PGCE or QTS, not every one will and OP may find it hard to move into another job without having either. Of course, there are other routes into teaching which will grant you QTS, such as Teach First. These might be worth looking into as QTS is worth having for flexibility in your career; plus, as I understand it, state schools don't hire people without QTS. The idea that QTS means that you earn more is only partially true. Independent schools do generally give a higher salary, but I've heard of instances on academies screwing teachers without QTS over by using it as an excuse to pay them less.

Academics, however, don't have to have QTS; I teach at a university and don't. However, increasingly these days, employers want academics to complete the PGCHE and so I'm now working towards this to ensure that my employability prospects are higher.
You're a gem Toronto, thank you for clarifying.:adore:

I had a feeling there wasn't a set rule to be honest.
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04MR17
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(Original post by Doonesbury)
I suspect you will need the ask some employers in the US.

What level do you plan to teach?

Stupid question from me (again I'm no expert on this) but don't you usually need a PGCE to teach?


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(Original post by Blue_Cow)
I thought you could teach in academies without holding a PGCE/QTS status?
See above.
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Flambeau
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Any other thoughts about how an Oxford degree is viewed in comparison to top Ivy/similar? Perhaps someone on this forum has experience with job hunting in America after graduating from Oxbridge?
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Doones
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(Original post by Flambeau)
Any other thoughts about how an Oxford degree is viewed in comparison to top Ivy/similar? Perhaps someone on this forum has experience with job hunting in America after graduating from Oxbridge?
There will almost definitely be such grads, but it's a long shot that they will still be on TSR unfortunately. Maybe ask the department of they can put you in touch with some grads who have followed that path?

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