No two individuals are identical? Watch

Sweetpeasw
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#1
So going through the snap revise videos, and have reached Classification and evolution... she's just said 'no two individuals are identical'... this has confused me.
what about identical twins, or organisms which clone themselves? they're genetically identical, so by default they are identical, right?
Name:  Screen Shot 2018-01-06 at 19.11.08.jpg
Views: 27
Size:  124.3 KB
0
reply
bobby147
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 year ago
#2
https://www.scientificamerican.com/a...not-identical/
1
reply
Flying Cookie
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#3
Report 1 year ago
#3
(Original post by Sweetpeasw)
So going through the snap revise videos, and have reached Classification and evolution... she's just said 'no two individuals are identical'... this has confused me.
what about identical twins, or organisms which clone themselves? they're genetically identical, so by default they are identical, right?
Name:  Screen Shot 2018-01-06 at 19.11.08.jpg
Views: 27
Size:  124.3 KB
I think that list is intended to outline the specific train of thought underpinning Darwin's theory.

In that context, referring to sexually reproducing organisms with inherent mixing of genes at each generation, "no two individuals are identical". In the context of individuals making choices and acting out their genetic predispositions in their potentially separate environments, the results may also not be "identical" even in mammalian "twins".

Assessing identity between organisms at a genetic or otherwise level is in itself not a straightforward task. E.g. we may be considered identical because we are the same species, so genetically you and I are identical in a way that you and a chimp wouldn't be. Many of these distinctions are made rather arbitrarily and can be very overlapping and confusing.

So the statement that two individuals are identical or not in a specific evolutionary sense, for the purpose of talking about their differences and how they play a role in evolution, is not an absolute claim. It is context dependent. There are many other angles, not just Darwin's.

For example, even in the realm of simple maths, a statement like "1 - 2 contains two numbers" only applies in a whole number range. Add a decimal point and that becomes 11 numbers (1.0, 1.1., etc.) so getting that context right is essential.

Biology especially is very sensitive to context and language! Fun fun fun
0
reply
Sweetpeasw
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#4
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#4
(Original post by Flying Cookie)
I think that list is intended to outline the specific train of thought underpinning Darwin's theory.

In that context, referring to sexually reproducing organisms with inherent mixing of genes at each generation, "no two individuals are identical". In the context of individuals making choices and acting out their genetic predispositions in their potentially separate environments, the results may also not be "identical" even in mammalian "twins".

Assessing identity between organisms at a genetic or otherwise level is in itself not a straightforward task. E.g. we may be considered identical because we are the same species, so genetically you and I are identical in a way that you and a chimp wouldn't be. Many of these distinctions are made rather arbitrarily and can be very overlapping and confusing.

So the statement that two individuals are identical or not in a specific evolutionary sense, for the purpose of talking about their differences and how they play a role in evolution, is not an absolute claim. It is context dependent. There are many other angles, not just Darwin's.

For example, even in the realm of simple maths, a statement like "1 - 2 contains two numbers" only applies in a whole number range. Add a decimal point and that becomes 11 numbers (1.0, 1.1., etc.) so getting that context right is essential.

Biology especially is very sensitive to context and language! Fun fun fun
thank you so much! this has really clarified it for me
1
reply
Sweetpeasw
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#5
thanks
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • Manchester Metropolitan University
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Wed, 19 Jun '19
  • University of West London
    Undergraduate Open Day - West London Campus Undergraduate
    Wed, 19 Jun '19
  • University of Warwick
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Fri, 21 Jun '19

How did your AQA A-level Biology Paper 3 go?

Loved the paper - Feeling positive (340)
15.73%
The paper was reasonable (1173)
54.28%
Not feeling great about that exam... (467)
21.61%
It was TERRIBLE (181)
8.38%

Watched Threads

View All