Holden
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#1
Report Thread starter 11 years ago
#1
What reasons did you give yourselves to cross certain universities off the list? I guess this can apply to pre-UCAS decisions as well as choosing which offer to accept.

So far I've found reasons to cross off all of my four choices which doesn't help...
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beccak_2k7
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#2
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#2
Just pick the one you prefer. You must have some sort of preference. Most people do.
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Y'anami!
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#3
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My primary reason would be the prestigiousness.. Maybe you should've applied elsewhere? You could start off by weighing the reasons, and eliminate the minor ones etc., and focus on the major things. I'll probably make a chart if I don't get into my top choice and do that.
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Jelkin
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#4
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I found myself put off unis that gave me lower offers ... no idea why. I guess I relished more of a challenge.
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Luce1501
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#5
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#5
you could write a list of preference for different things like course, location etc - see which ones tend to come out on top? or just weigh up pros and cons for each one. Do you want to be in a big city or not? Because London and Manchester are pretty massive whereas Durham you can walk across in 20 mins. Good luck!
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Saturday Night Special
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#6
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#6
Have some sort of weighting in your mind, think what factors matter to you, then try and think which factors matter the most. For me personally, prestige is the most important thing. Try using some of the following factors;

Campus/Open Plan
Urban/Rural Location
Prestige/Name of Uni
Quality of Uni
Quality of Course/Teaching
Size of University (No. of Students)
Composition of Student Body (Male/Female, Domestic/Foreign etc)

Etc. etc.
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Holden
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#7
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#7
Durham: Prestigious, internationally recognised, and northern (cheap to live) but sounds like the nightlife is a bit pants and there is a massive workload.
Imperial: Prestigious, internationally recognised, in London, close to home, I've heard the nightlife is crap despite being in london, massive workload and expensive to live in.
Manchester: Great nightlife (from what I've heard), cheap to live in, possibly a less taxing workload, but less prestigious and internationally recognised.
Bristol: Haven't really given them a chance because three people I know are already there, two of which are doing the same course as me and I'm kinda trying to get away from things and start again.

Last factor, which I've been trying to stop myself from turning into a deciding factor is the distance from Oxford, where my gf lives.
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Saturday Night Special
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Well you've generated some reasons to accept, and reasons to reject each place, now just think what matters most. Re; Imperial Id say the nightlife in london is great, especially considering the rest of the UoL, although Imperial itself does have a high % of males (65% to 70%). Which course/courses have you applied for?

Re the girlfriend thing, try to put it out of your mind when making a decision. I wont go into things to much, but you need to pick the right place for you, the place which will provide you personally with the best education/overall uni experience.
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gooseymcgoose
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#9
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Manchester is more [internationally] prestigious and internationally recognised than Durham. But sounds like you should pick Imperial.
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Holden
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#10
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#10
I've never really thought of Manchester as that prestigious, probably cause its such a new uni. It was my last choice when I was applying, and that was mostly cause they'll pay me £5k a year because I have good A-levels and am from a poorer background (have since realised that I can blag more than this from at least Imperial and most probably both others). That is the only real negative point I've got against it, but it is really difficult to find out how prestigious a uni is. Durham and Imperial both seem to consider themselves as #3 in the UK after Oxbridge, and Bristol seem to try to give off a similar kind of 'old prestigious uni' kind of vibe, I just didn't get the same kind of impression from Manchester.

What excuses did other give themselves for turning down any of these?
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Y'anami!
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#11
I do agree that Manchester is more known internationally than Durham (could be because people know Man U, so they know the city? As ridiculous as it sounds.. :P), but within the UK, isn't Durham more "prestigious"?

I'd probably turn down Manchester because it's so city-city but then.. you're applying to London so I geuss that wont help too much XD
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*Fool'sGold*
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(Original post by p0opy)
My primary reason would be the prestigiousness.. Maybe you should've applied elsewhere? You could start off by weighing the reasons, and eliminate the minor ones etc., and focus on the major things. I'll probably make a chart if I don't get into my top choice and do that.
So you'd rather go somewhere that you didn't like but was prestigious, over somewhere that you found a better place/friendlier but not as prestigious?
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*Fool'sGold*
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Personally, I like to go for gut instincts, the ones that gave me the best feeling when I visited.
I didn't apply to any universities that were well known as bad, all of the ones I applied to were in the top 30, so really, I know that whichever one I chose I'd be going somewhere respectable.

I visited the three I've got offers for already, (Exeter, Lancaster and Sheffield) and basically I went to all three with an open mind, to see which one i could genuinely see myself being happiest at.

I've also applied to Durham and Bristol, but haven't heard anything yet, and if I get offers, I'll go to them with an open mind too (I haven't visited them yet).

However, if I decided that I wasn't very keen on Durham for example, because I didn't like the city or the atmosphere or whatever but I thought that Lancaster had everything I needed to make me happy, I wouldn't force myself to go to Durham just because it would make people think "ooooh Durham!".

So,yeah, I'm just saying I don't think it's a good idea to go somewhere based on whether they are prestigious over whether you'll be happy there.
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Y'anami!
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#14
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(Original post by *Han*)
So you'd rather go somewhere that you didn't like but was prestigious, over somewhere that you found a better place/friendlier but not as prestigious?
Yeah actually.. but then my top choice is both prestigious and in my opinion, a better place. I said that only because it's just 3 years, but a HELL of a lot of money; my family isn't very rich. And I think if I were to spend someone else's money, I wanna make sure it's spent for the reason why my parents are willing to spend it, not for my comfort. But that's just me. Obviously you don't agree :P But I think prestigiousness is a big part in a lot of people's choices..
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Queen Alice
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Well, Durham just seemed really dull when I went there. Its pretty much equal to Bristol/Warwick anyway, so I won't end up going there. Too far north.

Lancaster does not have good enough job prospects, and not enough shops nearby. Also too far north (I want to be close enough to London I can go on the occasional day-trip there).

If my exams this week go badly, I guess I can't apply to the unis with AAA offer (Bristol, and possibly UCL if they ever get round to replying to me!)
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Holden
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#16
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#16
I'm not getting any funding from my parents myself, so I'm paying for the next 4 years with government bursaries and loans that I'm going to have to pay off when I'm working so I do want to get my moneys worth, cause it's not like I'll ever be able to do this again, but the decision is entirely mine. Problem is that I don't want to sacrifice getting a 'better' degree in favour of my comfort/social life, yet I don't want to sacrifice my enjoyment of the next 4 years just to get a degree which employers might regard more highly. Something tells me I'm not going to find an answer to this situation...
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Y'anami!
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#17
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(Original post by Holden)
I'm not getting any funding from my parents myself, so I'm paying for the next 4 years with government bursaries and loans that I'm going to have to pay off when I'm working so I do want to get my moneys worth, cause it's not like I'll ever be able to do this again, but the decision is entirely mine. Problem is that I don't want to sacrifice getting a 'better' degree in favour of my comfort/social life, yet I don't want to sacrifice my enjoyment of the next 4 years just to get a degree which employers might regard more highly. Something tells me I'm not going to find an answer to this situation...
Like you said, it's totally up to you! Isn't it so scary, I dread making decisions like these :P
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*pitseleh*
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(Original post by p0opy)
Yeah actually.. but then my top choice is both prestigious and in my opinion, a better place. I said that only because it's just 3 years, but a HELL of a lot of money; my family isn't very rich. And I think if I were to spend someone else's money, I wanna make sure it's spent for the reason why my parents are willing to spend it, not for my comfort. But that's just me. Obviously you don't agree :P But I think prestigiousness is a big part in a lot of people's choices..
I'm with you on that. Even if I'd have preferred another university to Oxford, I'd still have put Oxford first if I'd had to decide. And I agree with your sentiments of wanting to spend your parents money wisely.. though in my case, my parents won't be contributing anything, so it's really a matter of going to the place I think is going to 'get me furthest' in my working life. After all, that's an awful lot of student debt I will have to pay back on my own.

However, like you, I also feel that the most prestigious university on my list is my favourite, so fortunately I haven't had to make any such choices between universities (also got rejected by a couple, so that makes things a lot easier anyway, heh! )
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Holden
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#19
Report Thread starter 11 years ago
#19
(Original post by p0opy)
Like you said, it's totally up to you! Isn't it so scary, I dread making decisions like these :P
I just know that I'm going to regret my decision at some point because I have found bad points for each of my choices. Everyone I know who went to uni this year has had an amazing time and doesn't regret their decision at all which sucks. I almost wish I didn't have a choice.
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*pitseleh*
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(Original post by Holden)
I just know that I'm going to regret my decision at some point because I have found bad points for each of my choices. Everyone I know who went to uni this year has had an amazing time and doesn't regret their decision at all which sucks. I almost wish I didn't have a choice.
If it's any help (and I'm going to sound like a horrendous cynic here), when most of my friends started their degrees a few years ago, with the exception of one they all seemed to be having an amazing time. However.. they all graduated last summer, and of the tens of close friends I have who went to university, only a handful are still happy with their choice (whether that's because it got them onto a post-grad course, or whether that's because it got them a good job). Most of them wish they'd done something different.

My point is that even if you 'get everything right' in your university choice, you are only there for three years of your life - and even if those three years are brilliant, they won't guarantee you happiness for the rest of your life. I'm sure a lot of people will disagree with this, but I think it would be wise to focus a bit more on the long-term options. I mean, if you find a course and university which will serve to get you far in life, which you will also really enjoy, then fantastic. However, if you're having to make a decision between the two things, then IMHO, it might be wiser to pay more attention to the long-term benefits than the short-term ones.

... Which, before anyone suggests it, is not to say that you should spend three years at a university you hate, simply because it's 'pragmatic' to do so. What I mean is, if you're content with all of your universities, and view them as equal in that respect, then you may as well go for the one that is going to provide you with the best start in life.
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