WillVal
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So, I'm pretty bad when it comes to maths. I've tried so many methods to get better but its no use, I do terrible in my mocks and it really puts me down, in my last mock, I received a level 3a.

I am in desperate need of different methods of revision, I am sitting my GCSEs this year.
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kathasora
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I failed most of my math tests leading up to my IGCSEs but ended up getting an A. I got a friend to tutor me and did tons of past papers. I would recommend looking for a tutor that has the patience to sit next to you and push you to keep working on a problem without just giving you the solution. Math can be hard and frustrating but I have found with a little extra work and enough patience you will make it through. Good Luck.
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WillVal
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I will attempt to find a tutor to push me to do better, thank you.
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Zaspo
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last year when i was in year i got a level 2 in the mocks but in the holidays i revised and in november mocks i got a level 4 for maths and then in december mocks i got a level 5 and got put on the higher paper, basically what i mean is jjust do the best revision you can and what you get your grades you will be happy because your your best and i will give you a few revison websites.

mathswatch

mathgenie
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erratic_deus
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You can't do well in maths if you don't like maths.

Try to find a way to like the subject.
- Is it your teachers?
- Is it that you always seem to fail?

The theories in mathematics can sometimes be very philosophical. Therefore very engaging, you can learn to like/appreciate maths this way.
Simple questions based on simple KS2 maths can be presented really well and become interesting.

Debunking truths such as why Root A x Root B isn't always equal to RootAB can help you understand more (also you are less likely to forget it if you know the why, not the how).

So I'll ask you a why.
Why is it that when you add any two odd numbers you get an even number?
When you understand the why, you can answer the how.
Prove that the sum of any two odd numbers is always a multiple of 2.

Maths isn't just about doing past papers.
You have to want to do past papers, since you like the subject - otherwise you won't do well.

Also practice doesn't always make perfect. You could just make bad mathematical habits for example when rushing you might always see "8" instead of "3" and mess up all your working.
This has happened to me in (X+3)(X-3) I missed out 3 easy marks as a result.

Then after understanding the why, and getting closing to the "how" you may also want some inspiration in between.

Maths lessons are often dull and uninspiring, and this is coming from a person who spends over 5 hours a week in Maths lessons.
Sometimes when I'm bored, I watch documentaries about maths and they inspire me.
I won't understand them in entirety and that is the point. You don't understand it, yet

After all that, you can go back to your basic maths with a bit more inspiration.

This reply will mainly talk about Algebraic proof, a common 4 to 5 marker which is often left unanswered. And I hope after reading this comment, you find a way to understand and always get the marks in Algebraic proof. Because it can really be so simple.

How

1. To represent an odd number algebraically
2. A squared number algebraically
3. A multiple of 3 algebraically
4. An even number algebraically
5. Two consecutive even numbers
6. Two consecutive odd numbers
7. Any two even numbers.
8. Any two odd numbers.
9. A cubed number


Why

1. An odd number is ALWAYS an even number add or take away 1.
How would you express this algebraically?

2. An even number is ALWAYS any number which is divisible by two.
How would you express this algebraically?

3. A multiple of 3 is any number divisible by 3 or multiplied by 3.
How would you express this algebraically?

4. A squared number algebraically is ALWAYS a number that has been multiplied by itself.
How would you express this algebraically?

5. A consecutive even number is ALWAYS a base even number, with 2 added on or taken from the base number (e.g 4a, 2a, 10a+2 can be bases)

6. A consecutive odd number is ALWAYS a base odd number, with 2 added on or taken away from the base number (e.g 2a+1, 4a+3)
Spoiler:
Show

Questions you can start asking from this
Why are odd numbers represented as any even number + 1 and etc.
Why must you add 2 or take away 2 from an odd number represented algebraically.


7. Any two even numbers is any number divisible by 2 paired with another number of the same property [expressed Algebraically]
Spoiler:
Show

Questions you can ask
How would you simplify 6a+6 to express it as a simplified even number.
Why would you simplify 6a+6 to express it as a simplified even number - Examiners prefer answers expressed in the form 2(3a+3) - shows a number can be multiplied by 2.


8. Any two odd numbers is any odd number (expressed algebraically) paired with another number of the same property.
Spoiler:
Show

Questions to ask:
Why is 2(3a+1) not an odd number.
Why is 2(3a+1)+1 an odd number.


9. A cubic number is any number multiplied by itself 3 times.

Spoiler:
Show

Questions to ask:
Why is 3a not a cubic number. Why/why not?
Is 9a a cubic number? Why/Why not?

Catching yourself doing wrong maths, guarantees you'll remember the right thing.
Are any of the two above correct? I want you to tell me.
Are both of the two above incorrect? Find me a correct algebraic term.


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