Which of these is grammatically correct?

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complicit
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#1
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#1
'both of which are great assets to the study at university'

or

'both of which are great assets for the study at university'


... or neither?

Thank you!
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Kevin De Bruyne
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#2
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(Original post by complicit)
'both of which are great assets to the study at university'

or

'both of which are great assets for the study at university'


... or neither?

Thank you!
I'm not an expert but I would say '... to studying at university' (or studies - I think you want this instead of 'the study'

Or perhaps reword it if possible depending on the context e.g. 'Both of which are skills that can be applied to studying at university'
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sterchess
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(Original post by Kevin De Bruyne)
I'm not an expert but I would say '... to studying at university'

Or perhaps reword it if possible depending on the context e.g. 'Both of which are skills that can be applied to studying at university'
the to vs for doesnt matter.
the key thing is changing the study to studying or "university study (ing)"
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Notoriety
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both of which are great assets for study at university

This works as study is used as a mass noun. It might seem clunky, in which cause gerund it to for studying at university or for undergraduate study.
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PQ
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(Original post by complicit)
'both of which are great assets to the study at university'

or

'both of which are great assets for the study at university'


... or neither?

Thank you!
Doesn’t matter. University staff know which attributes are useful for university study. You don’t need to waste space in your ps pointing out the obvious. Use the space to give some specific examples of when you have demonstrated those attributes.
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complicit
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Thanks all for the replies!

(Original post by PQ)
Doesn’t matter. University staff know which attributes are useful for university study. You don’t need to waste space in your ps pointing out the obvious. Use the space to give some specific examples of when you have demonstrated those attributes.
I am writing that sentence after mentioning that through home study(*again, is this 'study or studying ) has allowed me learn independently to organise my time efficiently, (insert sentence here).

Would it still be unnecessary to mention the sentence?

Thanks!
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the bear
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(Original post by complicit)
'both of which are great assets to the study at university'

or

'both of which are great assets for the study at university'


... or neither?

Thank you!
maybe say both of which assist greatly in University studies
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complicit
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(Original post by the bear)
maybe say both of which assist greatly in University studies
Ah I think that sounds better thank you!

Spoiler:
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How does 'Moreover, through home study I have been able to learn independently and organise my time efficiently' sound (the beginning part of the sentence before 'both of which...')
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PQ
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(Original post by complicit)
Thanks all for the replies!



I am writing that sentence after mentioning that through home study(*again, is this 'study or studying ) has allowed me learn independently to organise my time efficiently, (insert sentence here).

Would it still be unnecessary to mention the sentence?

Thanks!
Then you don't need to spell it out. Talk about your independent study and time management - you don't have waste space in your PS to lecture admissions staff on the need for independent learning and time management in a degree.
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Good bloke
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(Original post by the bear)
maybe say both of which assist greatly in University studies
:spank:

But with the upper case U in 'university' replaced by a lower case u.

However, giving admissions tutors lessons in what is useful at university is just a waste of space, as has been pointed out by PQ.
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complicit
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(Original post by PQ)
Then you don't need to spell it out. Talk about your independent study and time management - you don't have waste space in your PS to lecture admissions staff on the need for independent learning and time management in a degree.
I see! Also, if the subjects I study help me particularly for the subject of degree choice, should I mention that? e.g A level subjects 'x', 'y' and 'z', provide a valuable skill set for the study of *degree subject*, as they bla bla bla?
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PQ
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(Original post by complicit)
I see! Also, if the subjects I study help me particularly for the subject of degree choice, should I mention that? e.g A level subjects 'x', 'y' and 'z', provide a valuable skill set for the study of *degree subject*, as they bla bla bla?
only if you genuinely can't think of anything else more relevant to say. Admissions staff know what A levels you're studying and whether they're good preparation or not.

If you want to talk about your A levels then talk about specific pieces of work you enjoyed or topics you found interested (or even those you found challenging). Include specifics and it makes your PS personal.
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(Original post by complicit)
I see! Also, if the subjects I study help me particularly for the subject of degree choice, should I mention that? e.g A level subjects 'x', 'y' and 'z', provide a valuable skill set for the study of *degree subject*, as they bla bla bla?
Certainly not! They are so generic and obvious that they will apply to everyone and well known to ATs. You should use your valuable space on material that is relevant to you specifically and that makes a positive contribution to your application.
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complicit
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(Original post by PQ)
only if you genuinely can't think of anything else more relevant to say. Admissions staff know what A levels you're studying and whether they're good preparation or not.

If you want to talk about your A levels then talk about specific pieces of work you enjoyed or topics you found interested (or even those you found challenging). Include specifics and it makes your PS personal.
(Original post by Good bloke)
Certainly not! They are so generic and obvious that they will apply to everyone and well known to ATs. You should use your valuable space on material that is relevant to you specifically and that makes a positive contribution to your application.
Thank you, I will make changes! I'm guessing work experience would be the place to talk about what skills you gained and maybe how they are relevant to the course?
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Good bloke
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(Original post by complicit)
Thank you, I will make changes! I'm guessing work experience would be the place to talk about what skills you gained and maybe how they are relevant to the course?
A common mistake is to try and stretch all sorts of improbable and irrelevant transferable skills from a bout of dish-washing, waitressing or call answering to studying at university. Another waste of space.

Concentrate on your interest and ability in, and your potential to study your subject.
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