Would you altruistically donate a kidney?

Watch
unrecognisable
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#1
Altruistically donating a kidney means that you don't know the recipient of your kidney. ie Its not for a friend or family member, or anyone remotely related to you for that matter- it is anonymous.

I'm considering it.. the only thing currently holding me back being finding the time. However, 'finding the time' in my menial life probably pales in importance to someone receiving a life saving/changing opportunity. Then I think is my blase response actually not properly comprehending what donating an organ entails.

Whilst we're on the topic please feel free to discuss your opinions, thoughts and feelings on the opt in/opt out system.
0
reply
Garchomp619
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#2
Report 3 years ago
#2
Hell no
0
reply
unrecognisable
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#3
(Original post by Garchomp619)
Hell no
Reasons?
0
reply
igotohaggerston
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#4
Report 3 years ago
#4
I think you should save your kidney for someone you know, don't want your sister dying and you kicking yourself for giving a stranger your kidney!
3
reply
handavnahis
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#5
Report 3 years ago
#5
I definitely agree with the opt out system. Being an organ doner, I would be happy to donate my kidney to whomever needs it, but only after death. It's a very admirable thing to do while you may still need it.
0
reply
merlynnn
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#6
Report 3 years ago
#6
Absolutely not. I dont want my kidney to go to some stranger who may have abused their body with alcohol or something. Id only donate if i knew the person.
1
reply
TimmonaPortella
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#7
Report 3 years ago
#7
(Original post by eilidhchambe)
ie Its not for a friend or family member, or anyone remotely related to you for that matter- it is anonymous.
Erm... no? I'd give a kidney to save a family member or close friend, and anyone can have them when I'm dead, but I would never consider having organs removed for no-one in particular.

Surgery is a big deal. As scientific and advanced as it now is, ultimately what is happening is you're being put on a table and other people are cutting you open, and then, in this case, cutting out part of your body. Which you then no longer have, putting you, all else aside, at risk if you have any problems with your remaining kidney. Personally I would need a much more specific and personal reason to put myself through that than the one you've given.
0
reply
LeapingLucy
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#8
Report 3 years ago
#8
(Original post by eilidhchambe)
Altruistically donating a kidney means that you don't know the recipient of your kidney. ie Its not for a friend or family member, or anyone remotely related to you for that matter- it is anonymous.

I'm considering it.. the only thing currently holding me back being finding the time. However, 'finding the time' in my menial life probably pales in importance to someone receiving a life saving/changing opportunity. Then I think is my blase response actually not properly comprehending what donating an organ entails.

Whilst we're on the topic please feel free to discuss your opinions, thoughts and feelings on the opt in/opt out system.
No, because I would be worried that a sibling might need it in the future and I wouldn't be able to give it to them.

I donate blood, and I'm on the bone marrow register - I'm happy to give either of those to a stranger. I just wouldn't give a kidney as you have a finite amount (1 spare!)

I'm definitely in favour of an opt-out organ donation system - I am a registered organ donor.
0
reply
igotohaggerston
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#9
Report 3 years ago
#9
(Original post by handavnahis)
I definitely agree with the opt out system. Being an organ doner, I would be happy to donate my kidney to whomever needs it, but only after death. It's a very admirable thing to do while you may still need it.
I think that the opt-out system is very dangerous as someone could not be well-informed of this and hence not opt out. I feel it is absolutely disgusting to harvest a dead body's organs without the consent of the person when they were alive!
0
reply
Pathway
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#10
Report 3 years ago
#10
Tbh, no, but only because my kidneys probably wouldn't be suitable anyway because of a genetic connective tissue disorder I have, and even if they were suitable they'd probably **** up even more than they already have in the future.
0
reply
Kindred
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#11
Report 3 years ago
#11
Honestly no. I think it's a really honourable thing to do, but just no. There are rather big risks involved and you never know when you're going to need your "spare" kidney.
If I were made aware that somebody were in desperate need then I might consider it if it wouldn't be a stupid idea with my medical conditions. I doubt I would even then though to be honest.
2
reply
Anonymous #1
#12
Report 3 years ago
#12
(Original post by Kindred)
Honestly no. I think it's a really honourable thing to do, but just no. There are rather big risks involved and you never know when you're going to need your "spare" kidney.
This. Friend of mine lost a kidney in a fall where he landed awkwardly. It can happen to anyone at any time. You never know how you'll do without it, and it's all well saying you only need one to live, but it ignores all potential risks and assume 100% health, which you can not plan for with absolute certainty. You have two for a reason.
0
reply
chelseadagg3r
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#13
Report 3 years ago
#13
If I heard of someone needing one, or I were contacted for whatever reason, I'd definitely consider it if I was suitable. I wouldn't walk into a hospital and just offer one up though
0
reply
Anonymous #2
#14
Report 3 years ago
#14
No tbh
my brother might need it or i might need it (especially since my nan had kidney failure so who knows what might happen)
after death is different, people can do whatever they want with my organs.
0
reply
303Pharma
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#15
Report 3 years ago
#15
For blood kin in a heartbeat. Stranger, hell no

unless i was dying from chronic unrelated disorders, in which case, harvest anything that would +1 humanity. <3
0
reply
unrecognisable
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#16
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#16
These are all very plausible, understandable reasons and I hope people dont mind my challenging them because I want to make an informed, balanced decision. Please do not think I am passing any judgement etc! On a general note I'd like to point out that donating organs when you die isn't as simple as it sounds, if you have a slow death or you do not die within a certain window- the organs cannot be used. They then need adequate storage facilities ie if you die suddenly then your organs can't be used. Therefore it's difficult to rely on post-mortem organ donations.

(Original post by igotohaggerston)
I think you should save your kidney for someone you know, don't want your sister dying and you kicking yourself for giving a stranger your kidney!
(Original post by LeapingLucy)
No, because I would be worried that a sibling might need it in the future and I wouldn't be able to give it to them.

I donate blood, and I'm on the bone marrow register - I'm happy to give either of those to a stranger. I just wouldn't give a kidney as you have a finite amount (1 spare!)

I'm definitely in favour of an opt-out organ donation system - I am a registered organ donor.
I'm a child of 4- my siblings have each other to rely on.. does this change your view? Also the thought that, forbid, something happened to you and there was no one for your sister.. would you not want a stranger to donate to those that don't have a functioning one, let alone a spare? Very commendable Lucy- is donating bone marrow particularly invasive? I have heard mixed reviews on it/seen patients who have had bone marrow transplants and for some reason they seem to go a bit mad (which is apparently a recognised thing- to my surprise!).

(Original post by merlynnn)
Absolutely not. I dont want my kidney to go to some stranger who may have abused their body with alcohol or something. Id only donate if i knew the person.
Unfortunately I don't have any stats on how many people are actually substance abusers vs how many have conditions unrelated to their life choices. Anywho, lets imagine for a minute that it is a substance abuser- theres very low levels of relapse with patients that have received organ donations. It could be the thing to change their life around (I think they also have to show commitment to change etc beforehand). And then there's the argument that people substance abuse as a result of a coping mechanism etc but that's long and I shan't get into it. There's this thing it's called the altruistic donor chain it means that from my, one donation it means that another donation is triggered and suddenly a handful of donations- some of which will be from people that haven't substance abused.

(Original post by igotohaggerston)
I think that the opt-out system is very dangerous as someone could not be well-informed of this and hence not opt out. I feel it is absolutely disgusting to harvest a dead body's organs without the consent of the person when they were alive!
I take issue with this too... as an aspiring medical student I take issue with the fact it is not proper consent. You cannot assume that everyone, even if they do all thoroughly understand the opt out system, fully understands their choice in not opting out.
0
reply
unrecognisable
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#17
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#17
(Original post by Anonymous)
This. Friend of mine lost a kidney in a fall where he landed awkwardly. It can happen to anyone at any time. You never know how you'll do without it, and it's all well saying you only need one to live, but it ignores all potential risks and assume 100% health, which you can not plan for with absolute certainty. You have two for a reason.
I'm truly sorry to hear about your friends misfortune. But surely if everyone worried about their other kidney then everyone with kidney failure of a certain extent would die? Rather than lots of people risking the fact they might one day need their kidney in which case if we have lots of donors this gap can just then be filled again and so the process continues.. surely this saves more people in general?
0
reply
LeapingLucy
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#18
Report 3 years ago
#18
(Original post by eilidhchambe)


I'm a child of 4- my siblings have each other to rely on.. does this change your view? Also the thought that, forbid, something happened to you and there was no one for your sister.. would you not want a stranger to donate to those that don't have a functioning one, let alone a spare? Very commendable Lucy- is donating bone marrow particularly invasive? I have heard mixed reviews on it/seen patients who have had bone marrow transplants and for some reason they seem to go a bit mad (which is apparently a recognised thing- to my surprise!).
I can see why, if you have multiple siblings, you might be more willing to donate your spare kidney - your siblings each have other siblings to rely on.

Personally, I only have one sibling, so I wouldn't want to risk it.

I would of course be happy to donate both my kidneys to strangers if I died, but I would not be willing to while alive for the family reason.

I can't say I've ever heard anything about bone marrow recipients going 'a bit mad'.

And no, it's not an invasive procedure - about 75% of the time it's just like a normal blood donation, or sometimes it's an injection to extract bone marrow from your hip bone, but they do it under general anaesthetic.
1
reply
unrecognisable
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#19
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#19
(Original post by LeapingLucy)
I can see why, if you have multiple siblings, you might be more willing to donate your spare kidney - your siblings each have other siblings to rely on.

Personally, I only have one sibling, so I wouldn't want to risk it.

I would of course be happy to donate both my kidneys to strangers if I died, but I would not be willing to while alive for the family reason.

I can't say I've ever heard anything about bone marrow recipients going 'a bit mad'.

And no, it's not an invasive procedure - about 75% of the time it's just like a normal blood donation, or sometimes it's an injection to extract bone marrow from your hip bone, but they do it under general anaesthetic.
I work in a hospital and this woman was very much not in a good way, anyway I asked the permanent about it and apparently she was psychologically fine until after that procedure. Apparently it's a thing.. so I searched it and could literally find one inconclusive paper on it. Anyway, I'm sure whatever percentage losing the plot isn't that high and their surviving is largely more important. I will look into bone marrow donation- I think I will consider doing it myself. Thanks for your help/and without trying to sound condescending; for your contributions!
0
reply
LeapingLucy
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#20
Report 3 years ago
#20
(Original post by eilidhchambe)
I work in a hospital and this woman was very much not in a good way, anyway I asked the permanent about it and apparently she was psychologically fine until after that procedure. Apparently it's a thing.. so I searched it and could literally find one inconclusive paper on it. Anyway, I'm sure whatever percentage losing the plot isn't that high and their surviving is largely more important. I will look into bone marrow donation- I think I will consider doing it myself. Thanks for your help/and without trying to sound condescending; for your contributions!
That's fine! If you're interested in getting on the register, look at the Anthony Nolan website.

They send you a kit and you just have to do a cheek swab and send it back. The vast majority of people on the register will never even be called to donate, so it's a really good but easy thing to do.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

How do you prefer to get careers advice?

I like to speak to my friends and family (23)
10.13%
I like to do my own research online using careers specific websites (135)
59.47%
I like speaking to the careers advisors at school, college or uni (31)
13.66%
I prefer to listen watch videos or listen to podcasts of people in my chosen career (33)
14.54%
Something else (let us know in the thread) (5)
2.2%

Watched Threads

View All