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divinademuerte
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Hi, I am hoping to start yr1 at Kent and wondered if there is any students that can comment on how have they have found their course in computer science.I have read that C.S is the degree with more drop outs at universities on the first year.I havent got much experience in programming but i am interested in artificial intelligence and I am thinking of doing a beginners course during the summer to be better prepared for this course.I haven't studied C.S for A level.Has anyone started this course with no experience in programming etc and found it ok? or was it too hard?Thanks
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Clarafehybelle
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I’m currently at Kent but studying a completely different degree. The uni itself I’ve found quite good though and I’ll let you know if I find anyone who is currently studying computer science
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R3negade
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Hi,

I am in my first year @ Kent doing CS.

Prior to the course, I had very little programming experience. I knew what variables and strings were, but not much else. The content is pretty thorough and at the moment I feel pretty confident with a decent amount of programming concepts, although, I am obviously still very much a beginner.

Java is the main language taught in the first year and we are using an IDE called bluej(https://www.bluej.org) that is specifically designed for learners. The creator of the IDE used to teach CS at Kent, but now works at Kings. The co-author of the complimentary book is faculty and teaches the introduction course to Java.

Whether the course is hard depends on the individual. Some people struggle with some aspects whilst others do not, however, there is a ton of support if needed. All of the lecturers have an open door policy and are receptive to any questions or issues you may have.

I am having a great time with the course and I can't wait 'til I go back on Monday.

If you have any specific questions, please let me know and if I can help, I will.
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divinademuerte
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(Original post by R3negade)
Hi,

I am in my first year @ Kent doing CS.

Prior to the course, I had very little programming experience. I knew what variables and strings were, but not much else. The content is pretty thorough and at the moment I feel pretty confident with a decent amount of programming concepts, although, I am obviously still very much a beginner.

Java is the main language taught in the first year and we are using an IDE called bluej(https://www.bluej.org) that is specifically designed for learners. The creator of the IDE used to teach CS at Kent, but now works at Kings. The co-author of the complimentary book is faculty and teaches the introduction course to Java.

Whether the course is hard depends on the individual. Some people struggle with some aspects whilst others do not, however, there is a ton of support if needed. All of the lecturers have an open door policy and are receptive to any questions or issues you may have.

I am having a great time with the course and I can't wait 'til I go back on Monday.

If you have any specific questions, please let me know and if I can help, I will.
This is so informative. Thank you so much 😊
How is your timetable? Do you have enough lectures/seminars? And finally, do you know what are the minimum grades people achieved to get in C.S last year?
Thank you!
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R3negade
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Hi,

2 lectures per module per week plus one class per module. Tbh it could be more but the pace is fine.

Grades are as per the UCAS requirements. I did an access course, but A levels were AAB. There are peeps on the course from a variety of paths inc A levels, access courses, IB and other relative experience.
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kalvinkataria
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I got into computer science at kent with DDD in engineering and IT. I had no previous programming experience nor did I practice anything over the summer to do with programming. I would recommend not doing any preparation as the first year is pretty easy and straight-forward. Best to enjoy your summer!
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divinademuerte
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(Original post by kalvinkataria)
I got into computer science at kent with DDD in engineering and IT. I had no previous programming experience nor did I practice anything over the summer to do with programming. I would recommend not doing any preparation as the first year is pretty easy and straight-forward. Best to enjoy your summer!
Thanks! I've got a conditional offer for AAB but I think I will more likely get BBB.
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divinademuerte
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(Original post by kalvinkataria)
I got into computer science at kent with DDD in engineering and IT. I had no previous programming experience nor did I practice anything over the summer to do with programming. I would recommend not doing any preparation as the first year is pretty easy and straight-forward. Best to enjoy your summer!
Did you get DDD BTEC or A level?
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stressedteen
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Hello! I'm from the Canterbury area and looking for a tutor for my Computer Science coursework, if anyone is interested in helping me - please dm me!
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LordFifth
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(Original post by R3negade)
Hi,

2 lectures per module per week plus one class per module. Tbh it could be more but the pace is fine.

Grades are as per the UCAS requirements. I did an access course, but A levels were AAB. There are peeps on the course from a variety of paths inc A levels, access courses, IB and other relative experience.
I'm also going to do an access course this September. Could you tell me what kind it was science/computing/maths?? Also what offer did they give you? Was the maths content of the access course enough to prepare you for uni because i'm thinking of doing maths a level alongside it. Sorry for all the questions but your help would be much appreciated!
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R3negade
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(Original post by LordFifth)
I'm also going to do an access course this September. Could you tell me what kind it was science/computing/maths?? Also what offer did they give you? Was the maths content of the access course enough to prepare you for uni because i'm thinking of doing maths a level alongside it. Sorry for all the questions but your help would be much appreciated!
Hi,

I did an access combined science course. The credits were split 12 each for biology, chemistry and physics and 9 credits for maths.

The offer I received from Kent was 30 credits at merit.

We covered nearly the whole year of the access maths in about the first two weeks of uni, so it was thrown at us pretty fast, but most of the concepts were familiar.

Prior to uni, my math was okish. I did well at college and in my previous uni term I have been very comfortable with the coursework.

Also, the maths that is getting taught to us at uni is specific to computer science and stuff that you will practically use. Currently, I am learning logic and I don't believe it is in the A level syllabus(I just checked - could be wrong?).

If you can manage your time and have access to exams then by all means I don't see any detriment to studying an additional A level, but if you do not mind applying to a uni that does not require A level maths, I would recommend getting familiarised with programming if you are not already. Kent starts off with Java and I believe some universities start off with C++, so they would be worth checking out.
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student997
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(Original post by R3negade)
Hi,

I did an access combined science course. The credits were split 12 each for biology, chemistry and physics and 9 credits for maths.

The offer I received from Kent was 30 credits at merit.

We covered nearly the whole year of the access maths in about the first two weeks of uni, so it was thrown at us pretty fast, but most of the concepts were familiar.

Prior to uni, my math was okish. I did well at college and in my previous uni term I have been very comfortable with the coursework.

Also, the maths that is getting taught to us at uni is specific to computer science and stuff that you will practically use. Currently, I am learning logic and I don't believe it is in the A level syllabus(I just checked - could be wrong?).

If you can manage your time and have access to exams then by all means I don't see any detriment to studying an additional A level, but if you do not mind applying to a uni that does not require A level maths, I would recommend getting familiarised with programming if you are not already. Kent starts off with Java and I believe some universities start off with C++, so they would be worth checking out.

currently on an Access to computing course. i have been called in for an interview in mid march 2018. Any tips on preparation?? What are some of the question asked during the interview??

ps; you have been very informative
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divinademuerte
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(Original post by student997)
currently on an Access to computing course. i have been called in for an interview in mid march 2018. Any tips on preparation?? What are some of the question asked during the interview??

ps; you have been very informative

Very relaxed interview. One interviewer, he asked why CS? why Kent? and a chat about my personal statement. Also he gave me a puzzle to solve.
My advice, know your personal statement well and I also read about the course content which was handy when talking about why CS....
good luck. I am sure you will do very well
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student997
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(Original post by divinademuerte)
Very relaxed interview. One interviewer, he asked why CS? why Kent? and a chat about my personal statement. Also he gave me a puzzle to solve.
My advice, know your personal statement well and I also read about the course content which was handy when talking about why CS....
good luck. I am sure you will do very well
what sort of puzzle???
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R3negade
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Pretty much exactly as divinademuetre mentioned. I was asked why Kent, what interests me about cs and questions about my personal statement.

I was asked a very basic question of how would I write a program that counted from 1 to 10.
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SemperLiber
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Hopefully you didn't pick Kent, currently 2nd year Comp Sci and it's awful. They sweeten you up with the good lecturers in the first year, the modules are pretty easy, realistically if you put in a bit of effort you'll get a first or at least a 2:1.
They do like to throw in some ******** modules though, particularly HCI and People and Computing, both awful, rely on group work and the marking is ridiculously subjective, HCI infamously has marked for "Magic", which is literally at the mercy of the marker.

Year 2, you get the **** lecturers, most should be in research roles, not teaching because to put it plainly, they can't teach. There's probably 2 ok lecturers. The double credit Software Engineering module is almost all group work and they make you use broken Open Source modelling software which they don't teach you how to use properly. They're fully aware that it's broken and even let us off doing part of last task because it was causing so many problems. The lecturer for Software Engineering is almost a massive prick, nobody likes him because he would rather spend the lecture roasting students for not understanding something that he's said after he's poorly explained it. Basically has no social skills.

Marking is poor. I alone have had to get my work remarked 5 times due to marking being incorrect and dropping about 30% on each assignment, which isn't exactly a small error. Some of my friends have also had the same issues.

Timed, exam condition programming assignments, the logic in this I can't see, all I have to say about that to be honest.

Lecturers push you to buy their books, and you're required to use an IDE developed by one of them in the first year which is garbage and miles behind any free IDE like eclipse and Intellij

Kent might be good for other subjects, some of my housemates love their course, but for Computer Science in my experience and a lot of others, it's ****.
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FutureCSGraduate
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I was looking at the courses at Kent. So far from my research, I found that Computer Science modules were overall different to Computing and Software Engineering. Also, Computing and Software Engineering was nearly the same thing. So what is the difference between Computer Science, Computing and Software Engineering at Kent?
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by R3negade)
Hi,

I am in my first year @ Kent doing CS.

Prior to the course, I had very little programming experience. I knew what variables and strings were, but not much else. The content is pretty thorough and at the moment I feel pretty confident with a decent amount of programming concepts, although, I am obviously still very much a beginner.

Java is the main language taught in the first year and we are using an IDE called bluej(https://www.bluej.org) that is specifically designed for learners. The creator of the IDE used to teach CS at Kent, but now works at Kings. The co-author of the complimentary book is faculty and teaches the introduction course to Java.

Whether the course is hard depends on the individual. Some people struggle with some aspects whilst others do not, however, there is a ton of support if needed. All of the lecturers have an open door policy and are receptive to any questions or issues you may have.

I am having a great time with the course and I can't wait 'til I go back on Monday.

If you have any specific questions, please let me know and if I can help, I will.
So overall how did you find the first and second year?
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ItsKiino
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(Original post by SemperLiber)
Hopefully you didn't pick Kent, currently 2nd year Comp Sci and it's awful. They sweeten you up with the good lecturers in the first year, the modules are pretty easy, realistically if you put in a bit of effort you'll get a first or at least a 2:1.
They do like to throw in some ******** modules though, particularly HCI and People and Computing, both awful, rely on group work and the marking is ridiculously subjective, HCI infamously has marked for "Magic", which is literally at the mercy of the marker.

Year 2, you get the **** lecturers, most should be in research roles, not teaching because to put it plainly, they can't teach. There's probably 2 ok lecturers. The double credit Software Engineering module is almost all group work and they make you use broken Open Source modelling software which they don't teach you how to use properly. They're fully aware that it's broken and even let us off doing part of last task because it was causing so many problems. The lecturer for Software Engineering is almost a massive prick, nobody likes him because he would rather spend the lecture roasting students for not understanding something that he's said after he's poorly explained it. Basically has no social skills.

Marking is poor. I alone have had to get my work remarked 5 times due to marking being incorrect and dropping about 30% on each assignment, which isn't exactly a small error. Some of my friends have also had the same issues.

Timed, exam condition programming assignments, the logic in this I can't see, all I have to say about that to be honest.

Lecturers push you to buy their books, and you're required to use an IDE developed by one of them in the first year which is garbage and miles behind any free IDE like eclipse and Intellij

Kent might be good for other subjects, some of my housemates love their course, but for Computer Science in my experience and a lot of others, it's ****.
I know it's been a year, but I just saw this, and I want to reflect on it because I think it's ridiculously misleading now that I'm onto third year, and I can reflect back on both when I agreed with this at the time, and what I actually think now.

If you didn't like HCI then you didn't understand the point of it and I can bet very good odds that the final year project you churn out will be extremely difficult to use on a basic level, much like the majority of new UI garbage you're seeing on the internet today. There were some problems in how it was presented and where it was in the course, but fundamentally it's one of the most important things you will do and it's a huge shame that most people don't actually realise it. Real people will use your designs, sometimes in extremely critical environments like, say, a hospital, or an aeroplane, where a bad design could say, kill people. If you can't see the point of a module that focuses on the human sides of how these things work then I genuinely have the feeling that you're not putting anything into understanding the course, and then just expecting enlightenment out, which is a common pattern from most of the people who complained about it in the last few years. It's the same in not possibly being able to comprehend why they would want to see your programming proficiency without assistance from StackOverflow in assignments - if you can't imagine this, you are literally not thinking critically about the course, and of course you're getting the blowback from not putting that sort of thinking in. And did you seriously criticise a module just for *having group work* as if that's something you're never going to do in the real world?

A few of your other points are literally universal across the entire university experience. Yes, lecturers in research subjects are there for research and have to teach on the side, which is something they generally don't enjoy doing. It's sad, but a structural university issue. Yes, lecturers write books and then expect you to buy them. It's sad, but a structural university issue. Papyrus was an unfortunate situation where there's literally nothing even remotely acceptable on the market to do this sort of thing and the past software was worse so it sucks for everyone. But in general, this just strikes me as sulking based on misconceptions about what university actually is. And yes, I struggled during the second year! I had all of these complaints at the time! I was even affected by the prior year's lecturer strikes and saw my classes and lectures slashed in half and one of my exams stripped of content! But time, and the later enthusiasm to apply myself, allowed me to gain perspective. This is what computer science courses are like.
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