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    G601 is going to be a better choice if solely focusing on a software development career, right? But for an IT job in general, is G601 going to be looked down by G400 because G601 focuses more on a specific aspect of computer science, rather than all of it in general. Or is it the opposite, G601 is going to look better on a CV in any job because its still computer science, but focused in greater detail at a certain element of it instead of the whole thing.
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    The most important questions are -
    - What do you enjoy doing most?
    - What kind of job are you most interested in applying for at the end?

    Firstly, you will have no problem getting a programming job with a computer science degree as long as you are actually competent at programming - that's a fairly normal thing to do.

    If you do a software engineering degree and then decide you want a job in some other IT discipline later on, then that's also not uncommon. The important thing employers look for in a graduate is having technical skills, the ability and willingness to learn, a good attitude, good "people" skills, etc. Your choice of career isn't going to be cut off just because it's not a perfect match for your degree.

    There'll always be some variation at different universities, but at least for my course at Staffs Uni, G600/G601 has been heavily focused around programming and various aspects of software development, so I imagine most universities will be similar. You'll probably find about half the modules are programming-based, with several others which are related (directly or indirectly) to programming in various languages and software projects (e.g. Object Oriented design, UI design, web development, mobile development, databases/SQL, project management..)

    With that said, there's almost certainly going to be some some general Computer Science thrown in with software engineering, because programming is based on that - data structures, algorithms, some maths, hardware, electronics, networking, etc.

    Even on the G400/401 courses, you'll probably find at least a few courses cover those software engineering modules - most likely at least one or two programming languages (perhaps assembly too in a hardware-related module), and I'd assume it'll cover databases and project management too. There'll be a lot of cross-over.

    Some courses include a placement/sandwich year as well, so that's something else to consider from a career point of view, although with G600/G601 you'll probably be expected to go out and specifically get a programming job, whereas I imagine a computer science/computing degree will give credit for almost any kind of technical IT placement.

    Also, for G600/G601 it'll probably be mandatory that your FYP is a software development project. I think you get a lot more choice with computing or computer science.
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    (Original post by winterscoming)
    The most important questions are -
    - What do you enjoy doing most?
    - What kind of job are you most interested in applying for at the end?

    Firstly, you will have no problem getting a programming job with a computer science degree as long as you are actually competent at programming - that's a fairly normal thing to do.

    If you do a software engineering degree and then decide you want a job in some other IT discipline later on, then that's also not uncommon. The important thing employers look for in a graduate is having technical skills, the ability and willingness to learn, a good attitude, good "people" skills, etc. Your choice of career isn't going to be cut off just because it's not a perfect match for your degree.

    There'll always be some variation at different universities, but at least for my course at Staffs Uni, G600/G601 has been heavily focused around programming and various aspects of software development, so I imagine most universities will be similar. You'll probably find about half the modules are programming-based, with several others which are related (directly or indirectly) to programming in various languages and software projects (e.g. Object Oriented design, UI design, web development, mobile development, databases/SQL, project management..)

    With that said, there's almost certainly going to be some some general Computer Science thrown in with software engineering, because programming is based on that - data structures, algorithms, some maths, hardware, electronics, networking, etc.

    Even on the G400/401 courses, you'll probably find at least a few courses cover those software engineering modules - most likely at least one or two programming languages (perhaps assembly too in a hardware-related module), and I'd assume it'll cover databases and project management too. There'll be a lot of cross-over.

    Some courses include a placement/sandwich year as well, so that's something else to consider from a career point of view, although with G600/G601 you'll probably be expected to go out and specifically get a programming job, whereas I imagine a computer science/computing degree will give credit for almost any kind of technical IT placement.

    Also, for G600/G601 it'll probably be mandatory that your FYP is a software development project. I think you get a lot more choice with computing or computer science.
    OK, a lot of good points and some great insight. I've definitely decided to go with software development, I was just wondering if there will be any disadvantages if I choose to stray a little off that path. Thanks for the reply, much appreciated!
 
 
 
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