N_k500
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hello,
i need some tips for statistics s1 i solved the 2017 jan and june papers saw some new stuff so they might come in 2018 exam
kindly can anyone suggest me the best way to be good at statistics
Thanks.
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Kevin De Bruyne
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(Original post by N_k500)
hello,
i need some tips for statistics s1 i solved the 2017 jan and june papers saw some new stuff so they might come in 2018 exam
kindly can anyone suggest me the best way to be good at statistics
Thanks.
Not much difference to normal maths - just practice practice practice, tackle unusual problems to be able to train your problem solving skills - the key to success in maths is not knowing beforehand how to solve every possible problem (impossible) but knowing how to try and work it out on the fly.

Also be careful of not losing pointless marks by omitting stuff like H0, H1, drawing conciliation and relating it back to the context etc etc. This cokes from doing past papers.
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matthewleechen
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Hi! I'm currently doing S2 and S3. I'd say that for statistics, what's most important is actually understanding the concepts. In other words, many people will be able to substitute into formulae, calculate correlation coefficients, perform regression analysis etc. However, in terms of the reasoning behind many statistical concepts (why are we doing this? where is this formula from? why can we not use this alternative form?), a lot of candidates fall short.

Overall, I'd say that Mechanics is conceptually harder than Statistics. However, people tend to perform worse in Statistics because the examiners frequently try to test for an understanding, rather than the acquired knowledge, of principles. So, my advice would be to make sure you always ask questions, check examiner reports, look at mark schemes and alternative methods, and ask your teacher the WHY? questions. Good Luck!
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N_k500
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(Original post by Kevin De Bruyne)
Not much difference to normal maths - just practice practice practice, tackle unusual problems to be able to train your problem solving skills - the key to success in maths is not knowing beforehand how to solve every possible problem (impossible) but knowing how to try and work it out on the fly.

Also be careful of not losing pointless marks by omitting stuff like H0, H1, drawing conciliation and relating it back to the context etc etc. This cokes from doing past papers.
Thanks
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N_k500
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(Original post by matthewleechen)
Hi! I'm currently doing S2 and S3. I'd say that for statistics, what's most important is actually understanding the concepts. In other words, many people will be able to substitute into formulae, calculate correlation coefficients, perform regression analysis etc. However, in terms of the reasoning behind many statistical concepts (why are we doing this? where is this formula from? why can we not use this alternative form?), a lot of candidates fall short.

Overall, I'd say that Mechanics is conceptually harder than Statistics. However, people tend to perform worse in Statistics because the examiners frequently try to test for an understanding, rather than the acquired knowledge, of principles. So, my advice would be to make sure you always ask questions, check examiner reports, look at mark schemes and alternative methods, and ask your teacher the WHY? questions. Good Luck!
Thank you for your advice
i usually feel the probability questions a little hard js there any way to get better at probability questions?
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matthewleechen
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(Original post by N_k500)
Thank you for your advice
i usually feel the probability questions a little hard js there any way to get better at probability questions?
For probability, it's a matter of simplifying down a problem. Basically all complex probability comes down to very simple principles (e.g conditional probability P(A|B) etc.) So if you have a question that initially looks hard, just tell yourself that this is not as hard as you think. If you try to link what you know to the question, you'll begin to understand probability questions in a more natural way.
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N_k500
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(Original post by matthewleechen)
For probability, it's a matter of simplifying down a problem. Basically all complex probability comes down to very simple principles (e.g conditional probability P(A|B) etc.) So if you have a question that initially looks hard, just tell yourself that this is not as hard as you think. If you try to link what you know to the question, you'll begin to understand probability questions in a more natural way.
Thank you very much if i i habe ny kther doubts i will ask you
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matthewleechen
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(Original post by N_k500)
Thank you very much if i i habe ny kther doubts i will ask you
You're welcome!
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