Should I take Computer Science or Information Technology for A level.

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Iahmed512
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Hi, I currently take computer science(CS) for GCSE and am in year 11. I am really confused with is whether I should take Information Technology(IT) or computer science(CS). I definitely want to do something to do with computers, but don't know which I should take.
I am doing quite well in tests and exams, in the first theory test I got a grade 6,then I got a grade 8, and then a grade 8 again, and then a grade 9, then a grade 9 in the year 10 mock and the test I had on hexadecimal and binary I got a grade 6, and in most recent mock I also got grade 9.
I do like the subject but I am not very good at the programming and don't enjoy it that much. While I have been doing well in tests and exams they have only been on theory. I only had a programming test at the beginning of year 10 and got a grade 6 in that. I definitely am fine with the theory side but computer science of course involves programming and with the current gcse it was 40% for algorithms and programming but it has changed to 50% now that coursework no longer counts.
I prefer and am good at the theory side of CS but with IT it is a lot different and I don't find the topics as interesting. However, with a-level CS you are allowed to work on coursework at home, and get help.
I have seen both at open evenings but with most schools they say about taking IT as I have mentioned myself I am not very good at programming but with some schools they say I should be fine since the major programming is in the coursework which is only 20%. The other thing with that though is that the exams like GCSE will also include programming.
The other thing with programming is that while I am definitely not good at programming, I might be better than I think because with the coursework my friend wasn't able to do something I was and asked how I managed to do that because they had been trying to figure it out for ages but then maybe I only know it because it is simple.
Which should I take, what is the big difference with IT?
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winterscoming
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IT is generally less technical and more business/enterprised focused. IT tends to cover some engineering concepts such as databases, and possibly some web design, but it's often focused on project management, IT system management/administration, some computing theory, legal/ethical issues, business applications, etc.

IT courses often have a database-related project which involves you to go through the software development process too - i.e. requirements analysis, system design, implementation, testing, documentation, etc.

If you find computing more interesting but are concerned about programming, then I'd suggest spending some of your own time trying to work on that (do it at your own pace before the course - it seems like you have plenty of time still so there's no need to rush.)

Getting comfortable with Programming and gaining confidence in solving programming problems comes from getting in some good practice until you start to be able to "think" in terms of the programming language and the various tools which the language gives you (e.g. if/else, for/while, lists, functions, strings, etc).

Learning the basics is a matter of being stubborn enough with the exercises you're doing until those things "click". Problem solving isn't a natural talent for anybody, it's a skill which you learn by doing it over and over until problems which once seemed "impossible" start to seem solvable, and you get comfortable with the process of looking at a problem, breaking it down into small problems, using the tools available to you, and solving it one step at a time.

You can always ask for programming help on forums or StackOverflow. Google has tonnes of information about specific aspects of programming. Usually if you get stuck with some particular detail, you can find the answer by trying a few different search terms and looking at other peoples' examples, tutorials, etc.

I'd suggest spending time on sites like these and just keep at it until you stop worrying so much about programming basics - even if programming is never a "strength" for you, you don't need to let that deter you from studying a course which you'd otherwise enjoy.

https://www.codecademy.com/learn/learn-python
https://developers.google.com/edu/python/
https://www.edx.org/course/introduct...itx-6-00-1x-11
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Iahmed512
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(Original post by winterscoming)
IT is generally less technical and more business/enterprised focused. IT tends to cover some engineering concepts such as databases, and possibly some web design, but it's often focused on project management, IT system management/administration, some computing theory, legal/ethical issues, business applications, etc.

IT courses often have a database-related project which involves you to go through the software development process too - i.e. requirements analysis, system design, implementation, testing, documentation, etc.

If you find computing more interesting but are concerned about programming, then I'd suggest spending some of your own time trying to work on that (do it at your own pace before the course - it seems like you have plenty of time still so there's no need to rush.)

Getting comfortable with Programming and gaining confidence in solving programming problems comes from getting in some good practice until you start to be able to "think" in terms of the programming language and the various tools which the language gives you (e.g. if/else, for/while, lists, functions, strings, etc).

Learning the basics is a matter of being stubborn enough with the exercises you're doing until those things "click". Problem solving isn't a natural talent for anybody, it's a skill which you learn by doing it over and over until problems which once seemed "impossible" start to seem solvable, and you get comfortable with the process of looking at a problem, breaking it down into small problems, using the tools available to you, and solving it one step at a time.

You can always ask for programming help on forums or StackOverflow. Google has tonnes of information about specific aspects of programming. Usually if you get stuck with some particular detail, you can find the answer by trying a few different search terms and looking at other peoples' examples, tutorials, etc.

I'd suggest spending time on sites like these and just keep at it until you stop worrying so much about programming basics - even if programming is never a "strength" for you, you don't need to let that deter you from studying a course which you'd otherwise enjoy.

https://www.codecademy.com/learn/learn-python
https://developers.google.com/edu/python/
https://www.edx.org/course/introduct...itx-6-00-1x-11
I'm not really interested in databases and Web design, administration etc. So computing does seem better in that case.
Thanks that is quite helpful.
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