transport in small intestine???? Watch

jonjoshelvey21
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#1
from the lumem to an epithelial cell I was told that na and glucose bind to a carrier protein to be transported into the cell but na goes down a concentration gradient and glucose goes against it but the process is passive? why would it be possible for glucose to move against the gradient if it's a passive process
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
reply
jonjoshelvey21
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#2
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#2
anyone
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
reply
jonjoshelvey21
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#3
anyone
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
reply
tremen222
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 year ago
#4
You are talking about a special type of transport protein called a co-transporter. Moving the sodium down its concentration gradient (both electric and chemical) releases energy as it favours the equilibrium (therefore reducing the free energy of the system).
This energy that sodium loses as it moves into the cell is the energy used by the protein co-transporter to move glucose against its concentration gradient.
the process is said to be passive because it does not break down ATP, but it uses the energy naturally stored in the gradient differences of compounds across the cell membrane.
0
reply
jonjoshelvey21
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#5
(Original post by tremen222)
You are talking about a special type of transport protein called a co-transporter. Moving the sodium down its concentration gradient (both electric and chemical) releases energy as it favours the equilibrium (therefore reducing the free energy of the system).
This energy that sodium loses as it moves into the cell is the energy used by the protein co-transporter to move glucose against its concentration gradient.
the process is said to be passive because it does not break down ATP, but it uses the energy naturally stored in the gradient differences of compounds across the cell membrane.
thanks so much for the reply. So for the transport of potassium and sodium from the epithelial cell to the capillary this is active transport i guess so does this require a co transporter or a carrier protein ?
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
reply
tremen222
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#6
Report 1 year ago
#6
(Original post by jonjoshelvey21)
thanks so much for the reply. So for the transport of potassium and sodium from the epithelial cell to the capillary this is active transport i guess so does this require a co transporter or a carrier protein ?
There are many different ways of transporting these compounds in and out of the cell. I assume you are talking about the sodium potassium ATPase, in which case it takes 3 sodium out by bringing 2 potassium in using active transport (ATP)
This is the potassium used for the transport of glucose. From a scientific paper:

"Activity of the Na+/K+ ATPase in the basolateral surface membrane generates Na+ and K+ concentration gradients, and the K+ gradient generates an inside-negative membrane potential. Both the Na+concentration gradient and the membrane potential are used to drive the uptake of glucose from the intestinal lumen by the two-Na+/one-glucose symporter (blue) located in the apical surface membrane. Glucose leaves the cell via facilitated diffusion catalyzed by GLUT2 (orange), a glucose uniporter located in the basolateral membrane."
0
reply
jonjoshelvey21
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#7
(Original post by tremen222)
There are many different ways of transporting these compounds in and out of the cell. I assume you are talking about the sodium potassium ATPase, in which case it takes 3 sodium out by bringing 2 potassium in using active transport (ATP)
This is the potassium used for the transport of glucose. From a scientific paper:

"Activity of the Na+/K+ ATPase in the basolateral surface membrane generates Na+ and K+ concentration gradients, and the K+ gradient generates an inside-negative membrane potential. Both the Na+concentration gradient and the membrane potential are used to drive the uptake of glucose from the intestinal lumen by the two-Na+/one-glucose symporter (blue) located in the apical surface membrane. Glucose leaves the cell via facilitated diffusion catalyzed by GLUT2 (orange), a glucose uniporter located in the basolateral membrane."
thanks so what does this mean about the higher/lower concentration gradient inside and outside the cell or are both na and k being moved against their concentration gradient?
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
reply
tremen222
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#8
Report 1 year ago
#8
(Original post by jonjoshelvey21)
thanks so what does this mean about the higher/lower concentration gradient inside and outside the cell or are both na and k being moved against their concentration gradient?
There is always more potassium inside of the cell and more sodium outside of the cell, hence the active transport of the Na+/K+ ATPase.
0
reply
jonjoshelvey21
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#9
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#9
(Original post by tremen222)
There is always more potassium inside of the cell and more sodium outside of the cell, hence the active transport of the Na+/K+ ATPase.
so both na and k move against their concentration gradient?
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
reply
tremen222
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#10
Report 1 year ago
#10
(Original post by jonjoshelvey21)
so both na and k move against their concentration gradient?
Yes
0
reply
jonjoshelvey21
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#11
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#11
(Original post by tremen222)
Yes
what about the concentrations of glucose and na in the co transport from the lumen to the epithelial cell?
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • Birmingham City University
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Sat, 23 Mar '19
  • University of Bolton
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Sat, 23 Mar '19
  • Harper Adams University
    Animals and Veterinary Sciences Open Day Undergraduate
    Sat, 23 Mar '19

Where do you need more help?

Which Uni should I go to? (116)
17.6%
How successful will I become if I take my planned subjects? (70)
10.62%
How happy will I be if I take this career? (115)
17.45%
How do I achieve my dream Uni placement? (97)
14.72%
What should I study to achieve my dream career? (63)
9.56%
How can I be the best version of myself? (198)
30.05%

Watched Threads

View All