Quyen_3
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Hello, I'm in year 12 and would soon apply to an architecture university this year so I've done quite a bit of research on the what university's offer. I've looked at Bath, Edinburgh, Cambridge, Cardiff and (not sure but..) Newcastle.

I'm more of a art/practical based person and less so scientific. Which university's would you think could be most suited to me? (It doesn't have to be the ones above ) and also for anyone studying architecture what is the typical day? I want to also find other pathways just in case architecture isn't for me.. so does anyone have reference to Careers that is art based.

I've taken Fine Art, Spanish, Maths and product design and the built environment A levels (a course where its predominant focuses on architecture using a wide range of skills)

Many thanks!
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Amanzhol
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Hi!

I'll answer this here and I've noticed your two other threads to do with specifically Edinburgh and Cambridge, which I can tell you about here too

Just to let you know, I'm in Year 13 and have applied to study Architecture at some of the places you have mentioned:
Cambridge (received offer); Bath (decision pending); Edinburgh (received offer); Glasgow School of Art (interview invite); Strathclyde (received offer).

First thing's first, if you know that you lean more towards the art than the science side of architecture, I'd suggest you do not pursue Bath or Newcastle as these two (especially Bath) are known for being the more technical/sciencey courses that are more practical than arty. Edinburgh, Cambridge and Cardiff are probably more what you're looking for as they are on the slightly more arty/creative side. One you should definitely consider is The Bartlett (UCL) because they are on the 'extreme' end of creativity - the school is very arty and conceptual which shows through the rather unique work they produce, and the school is also often considered the best in the UK and often in the world for Architecture both among architects and on official rankings (the only reason I didn't apply for here is because I'm from London and want to get out). Another one that might interest you is The Mackintosh (Glasgow School of Art), which is one that I applied to, and of course being an art school means the course is on the arty/creative side. The school itself is also well respected and quite prestigious within the industry, only equalled by Edinburgh in terms of the Scottish architecture schools.

On to what you asked about Edinburgh in your other post... The course used to be part of the old Edinburgh College of Art, so again, it is quite an arty one. It also has a good reputation for the Architectural History element of its course if that interests you, and in general is a very well regarded architecture school. As a city, it is an amazing place to study Architecture. I have visited several times because I love the place so much - it's immensely beautiful and historic both architecturally and in its landscape, and has enough of a city feeling to have plenty to do but is small enough to feel wonderfully peaceful and friendly. I have a friend in his first year of Architecture there and is really loving it, and it was going to be my first choice because I was expecting a rejection from Cambridge, but since I now have offers from both (to my utter surprise), Edinburgh will be my insurance. What I can also tell you from my friend's experience at Edinburgh is that so far the projects he's been set have been really really interesting, such as designing a writer's cabin for a tiny island that's just off the city's coast! And the longer first semester at Scottish schools just means you have more time to settle in and get a nice amount of work done without feeling too stressed (because they start in September whereas most English courses start in October).

Now about Cambridge Colleges... I applied to Pembroke and I'd thoroughly recommend it (not just because I'm biased )! For culture and fun as you said you're looking for, Pembroke is generally regarded the friendliest College, it is famous for its acting society, it has arguably the best food of all the Colleges, it's Cambridge's third oldest college, it's beautiful architecturally, the College Chapel is Sir Christopher Wren's first ever work (pretty amazing ), and as with all Colleges - it puts on brilliant parties known as 'bops' and the famous May Ball (usually in June confusingly enough!). It also has some serious upsides for us architects because the Director of Studies for Architecture (Dr. Max Sternberg, who interviewed me) is an absolutely lovely man, and the College is a few minutes walk from the department All that being said, the best way to choose your College is to make a shortlist by looking at them online and then visiting each of those on your shortlist during the open day in July, because you'll probably find that as soon as you walk into one of them it'll just feel right, like you're at home, which sounds cliché, but that's how I and the majority of applicants ended up choosing!

Back to your post that I'm writing this in response to... although I'm not studying Architecture yet, I do know that a typical day might start with a morning lecture before being briefed in the studio and continuing to work in the studio for most of the day on drawings and models (variations might be additional lectures or none at all, the occasional site visit or study trip). It's always a long day of work for Architecture students and gets later and later closer to deadlines, so just be aware of that!

If you're not absolutely sure that Architecture is for you, then perhaps consider doing an Art Foundation after you finish your A-levels, as this would introduce you to many new creative disciplines. The course is usually free and it'll vastly improve your portfolio for when it comes to applying to architecture/design/art school. Alternatively, it's not uncommon for people to start out doing the Part 1 Architecture course and decide to leave it there so that they can pursue a master's in some other creative discipline such as product design or sculpture or fine art, so don't feel like you have to become an architect once you start studying it!

Hope that helps, and I'm more than happy to answer any other questions!
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Quyen_3
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(Original post by Amanzhol)
Hi!

I'll answer this here and I've noticed your two other threads to do with specifically Edinburgh and Cambridge, which I can tell you about here too

Just to let you know, I'm in Year 13 and have applied to study Architecture at some of the places you have mentioned:
Cambridge (received offer); Bath (decision pending); Edinburgh (received offer); Glasgow School of Art (interview invite); Strathclyde (received offer).

First thing's first, if you know that you lean more towards the art than the science side of architecture, I'd suggest you do not pursue Bath or Newcastle as these two (especially Bath) are known for being the more technical/sciencey courses that are more practical than arty. Edinburgh, Cambridge and Cardiff are probably more what you're looking for as they are on the slightly more arty/creative side. One you should definitely consider is The Bartlett (UCL) because they are on the 'extreme' end of creativity - the school is very arty and conceptual which shows through the rather unique work they produce, and the school is also often considered the best in the UK and often in the world for Architecture both among architects and on official rankings (the only reason I didn't apply for here is because I'm from London and want to get out). Another one that might interest you is The Mackintosh (Glasgow School of Art), which is one that I applied to, and of course being an art school means the course is on the arty/creative side. The school itself is also well respected and quite prestigious within the industry, only equalled by Edinburgh in terms of the Scottish architecture schools.

On to what you asked about Edinburgh in your other post... The course used to be part of the old Edinburgh College of Art, so again, it is quite an arty one. It also has a good reputation for the Architectural History element of its course if that interests you, and in general is a very well regarded architecture school. As a city, it is an amazing place to study Architecture. I have visited several times because I love the place so much - it's immensely beautiful and historic both architecturally and in its landscape, and has enough of a city feeling to have plenty to do but is small enough to feel wonderfully peaceful and friendly. I have a friend in his first year of Architecture there and is really loving it, and it was going to be my first choice because I was expecting a rejection from Cambridge, but since I now have offers from both (to my utter surprise), Edinburgh will be my insurance. What I can also tell you from my friend's experience at Edinburgh is that so far the projects he's been set have been really really interesting, such as designing a writer's cabin for a tiny island that's just off the city's coast! And the longer first semester at Scottish schools just means you have more time to settle in and get a nice amount of work done without feeling too stressed (because they start in September whereas most English courses start in October).

Now about Cambridge Colleges... I applied to Pembroke and I'd thoroughly recommend it (not just because I'm biased )! For culture and fun as you said you're looking for, Pembroke is generally regarded the friendliest College, it is famous for its acting society, it has arguably the best food of all the Colleges, it's Cambridge's third oldest college, it's beautiful architecturally, the College Chapel is Sir Christopher Wren's first ever work (pretty amazing ), and as with all Colleges - it puts on brilliant parties known as 'bops' and the famous May Ball (usually in June confusingly enough!). It also has some serious upsides for us architects because the Director of Studies for Architecture (Dr. Max Sternberg, who interviewed me) is an absolutely lovely man, and the College is a few minutes walk from the department All that being said, the best way to choose your College is to make a shortlist by looking at them online and then visiting each of those on your shortlist during the open day in July, because you'll probably find that as soon as you walk into one of them it'll just feel right, like you're at home, which sounds cliché, but that's how I and the majority of applicants ended up choosing!

Back to your post that I'm writing this in response to... although I'm not studying Architecture yet, I do know that a typical day might start with a morning lecture before being briefed in the studio and continuing to work in the studio for most of the day on drawings and models (variations might be additional lectures or none at all, the occasional site visit or study trip). It's always a long day of work for Architecture students and gets later and later closer to deadlines, so just be aware of that!

If you're not absolutely sure that Architecture is for you, then perhaps consider doing an Art Foundation after you finish your A-levels, as this would introduce you to many new creative disciplines. The course is usually free and it'll vastly improve your portfolio for when it comes to applying to architecture/design/art school. Alternatively, it's not uncommon for people to start out doing the Part 1 Architecture course and decide to leave it there so that they can pursue a master's in some other creative discipline such as product design or sculpture or fine art, so don't feel like you have to become an architect once you start studying it!

Hope that helps, and I'm more than happy to answer any other questions!
Sorry I've only seen this today, thank you so much! This is super useful! I was looking at the course at Edinburgh University and I've seen that you could apply to 2 different courses, either BA (3years) or MA (4years)? I was wondering if you knew the difference in like what you study and which should be recommended?

Also for the entrance exams for Cambridge, what did you have to do? How did you find it? I was thinking of applying to Cambridge, however with it being so competitive and having compacted amounts of work/stress... I'm not too sure anymore ...
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Amanzhol
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(Original post by Quyen_3)
Sorry I've only seen this today, thank you so much! This is super useful! I was looking at the course at Edinburgh University and I've seen that you could apply to 2 different courses, either BA (3years) or MA (4years)? I was wondering if you knew the difference in like what you study and which should be recommended?

Also for the entrance exams for Cambridge, what did you have to do? How did you find it? I was thinking of applying to Cambridge, however with it being so competitive and having compacted amounts of work/stress... I'm not too sure anymore ...
No problem!

With Edinburgh, when you apply you automatically get put onto the MA course, then in your second year you'll decided whether you want to do the MA or just the BA, so don't worry about choosing between them for now! You'll study the same things on both of them for the first 2-3 years. The difference is that with the BA, you'll finish after 3 years with your Part 1 qualification and will go on to find a placement for a year before starting your Part 2, whereas the MA gives you an extra fourth year (which is usually free from tuition fees) to do an integrated placement and study a couple of selective courses alongside Architecture (for example, Design, History of Art/Architecture, Engineering/Construction), and potentially to study abroad for a semester or the whole year. It's worth noting that the MA is not equivalent to a Part 2, you'll qualify with your Part 1 and will have to study your Part 2 separately afterwards, but it will give you an additional year of experience and knowledge.

Cambridge doesn't have a pre-interview assessment for Architecture like a lot of courses, but there is an at-interview one in the morning of the day of your interview. This is a 30 minute written assessment on an unseen question, then a 30 minute drawing assessment (usually asking you to depict the space you're in/what's surrounding you outside, in a certain way). You are able to prepare for the written assessment by researching areas of architecture that interest you and are topical, and by knowing enough about a few examples of buildings that you could write about in your answer. As for the drawing test, to prepare for it you should be keeping a personal sketchbook of studies of buildings and spaces around you, as this will help you get used to sketching quickly but well. This sketchbook is also something they love to see alongside your portfolio during the interview. So the preparation for these assessments isn't as intense as having to revise for an exam like you'd have to for most other courses. Also, expect to be asked in the interview about what you wrote or drew in your assessment.

This assessment is only in its second year, so I don't think they're putting a great deal of weight on it in terms of judging your application (personally I felt that my assessment was very weak). What I'd say is most important is your portfolio and interview performance, so make sure you're concentrating on putting together a great portfolio and preparing for some of the questions they may ask you, but of course make sure you're ready for the assessment too.

I would certainly encourage you to apply, because as they say, the only guarantee of not getting in is by not applying in the first place. They interview 75-80% of all applicants, so you've got a good chance of at least getting an interview! Go for it, you'll regret it if you don't at least try
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