username2337287
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Regarding molecular toxicants, I've been doing some research into Benzene, and its effect on biological systems. The majority of intellectual sources regading this molecule, generally introduce degree level explanations, which make it difficult to understand.

How does Benzene cause Aplastic Anemia? Talk about the chemistry behind it?

How does Benzene cause Leukemia?

What chemical and structrual property makes Benzene behave in this way, and become a toxicant?

Any explanations regading the toxicity of Benzene is appreciated, including links to documents and articles.
Thank you.
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username2613789
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From some quick reading, it seems benzene is quoted as having a "Colchicine-like effect" in the bone marrow. This means it probably binds to the protein tubulin which normally polymerises to form mitotic spindles (which allow for the separation and shuffling-around of chromosomes during mitosis). This means it is a mitosis inhibitor in the bone marrow.
It isn't then hard to assume that inhibiting mitosis of the stem-cell precursors of hematopoiesis (the likes of which differentiate into red blood cells or leukocytes) will cause anaemia and leukaemia.
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(Original post by tremen222)
From some quick reading, it seems benzene is quoted as having a "Colchicine-like effect" in the bone marrow. This means it probably binds to the protein tubulin which normally polymerises to form mitotic spindles (which allow for the separation and shuffling-around of chromosomes during mitosis). This means it is a mitosis inhibitor in the bone marrow.
It isn't then hard to assume that inhibiting mitosis of the stem-cell precursors of hematopoiesis (the likes of which differentiate into red blood cells or leukocytes) will cause anaemia and leukaemia.
Such a concise explanation, took forever to understand this. Thank you for providing the starting point for my research, regarding the mechanisms of action of Benzene and anemia etc.
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