What is it like to study at LSE? Economics in particular.

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Joe-Mac
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Hi, just wanted to ask if anyone here has studied at LSE (London School of Politics and Economics) and what they thought of the experience. The campus looks great, and so does the location, I am just concerned that on UNISTATS (not sure how reliable it is) it says that overall satisfaction with an Economics BSc degree was only 63% which I find hard to believe coming from a university with such a high reputation. Economics is what I am interested in doing, so if any of you have graduated with an economics degree could you please give me some insight as to how it has helped you and what kind of jobs you have got from this. Cheers.
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||Techie||
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(Original post by Joe-Mac)
Hi, just wanted to ask if anyone here has studied at LSE (London School of Politics and Economics) and what they thought of the experience. The campus looks great, and so does the location, I am just concerned that on UNISTATS (not sure how reliable it is) it says that overall satisfaction with an Economics BSc degree was only 63% which I find hard to believe coming from a university with such a high reputation. Economics is what I am interested in doing, so if any of you have graduated with an economics degree could you please give me some insight as to how it has helped you and what kind of jobs you have got from this. Cheers.
Hi, I'm 3rd year Econ student and contrary to the ratings, my friends and I have had a great time at the LSE. The teaching is good but some lecturers just straight read off the slides which is annoying. Maybe another negative thing is that you dont always get past paper solutions (especially in Y3) which can make exam prep hard. On the bright side, Econ is one of the most flexible courses and you can specialise in so much as you get outside options in Y1,Y2 and 4 options in Y3 so you can tailor it to your preferences. In terms of job offers, if you want you can go down the IBD/S&T route or you can do consultancies/government jobs etc. Its a very versatile degree and all you need to do is to make sure you have the right internships and ECs to get your job.
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Joe-Mac
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(Original post by ||Techie||)
Hi, I'm 3rd year Econ student and contrary to the ratings, my friends and I have had a great time at the LSE. The teaching is good but some lecturers just straight read off the slides which is annoying. Maybe another negative thing is that you dont always get past paper solutions (especially in Y3) which can make exam prep hard. On the bright side, Econ is one of the most flexible courses and you can specialise in so much as you get outside options in Y1,Y2 and 4 options in Y3 so you can tailor it to your preferences. In terms of job offers, if you want you can go down the IBD/S&T route or you can do consultancies/government jobs etc. Its a very versatile degree and all you need to do is to make sure you have the right internships and ECs to get your job.
Thanks for the reply mate
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GW0909
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(Original post by ||Techie||)
Hi, I'm 3rd year Econ student and contrary to the ratings, my friends and I have had a great time at the LSE. The teaching is good but some lecturers just straight read off the slides which is annoying. Maybe another negative thing is that you dont always get past paper solutions (especially in Y3) which can make exam prep hard. On the bright side, Econ is one of the most flexible courses and you can specialise in so much as you get outside options in Y1,Y2 and 4 options in Y3 so you can tailor it to your preferences. In terms of job offers, if you want you can go down the IBD/S&T route or you can do consultancies/government jobs etc. Its a very versatile degree and all you need to do is to make sure you have the right internships and ECs to get your job.
Hi! I was wondering what classes would you recommend taking as a third year student? Is it true that taking more than one 300+ course in ec dept is too much of a workload? Thanks!
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||Techie||
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Well as I'm in the Econ department I kind of have to take more than one haha. But if you survived Y1 - Y2 jump, Y3 is not too bad. For reference, the so called 'easy' modules are Public, Labour and Industrial Economics although they are all dry as hell (think Micro 2 levels of dry). Monetary and Behavioural are pretty interesting but they are alot of work in terms of actual content. All in all, you should audit all courses you are interested in and try to see which lecturers you actually like as this has a huge impact on whether you feel like studying it.

N.B. if you are trying to get a first in Y3, dont go for more than one 'hard' option or you will find yourself completely overwhelmed (as many of my friends have done!)
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ddogg
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I wish I went to Warwick for economics instead
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Chance71
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(Original post by ddogg)
I wish I went to Warwick for economics instead
rally but isnt lse>warwick
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SiriusBlack54
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(Original post by Joe-Mac)
Hi, just wanted to ask if anyone here has studied at LSE (London School of Politics and Economics) and what they thought of the experience. The campus looks great, and so does the location, I am just concerned that on UNISTATS (not sure how reliable it is) it says that overall satisfaction with an Economics BSc degree was only 63% which I find hard to believe coming from a university with such a high reputation. Economics is what I am interested in doing, so if any of you have graduated with an economics degree could you please give me some insight as to how it has helped you and what kind of jobs you have got from this. Cheers.
Look- if you want to work in banking, a city law firm, or accounting- there isn't really a competition, LSE has nearly double the career intake of anywhere else despite being a third to a quarter of the size.

Investment banking (IB) analyst London intake was 15% LSE in 2017, and 20% in 2016- the next best was UCL at 7%.

It is still very competitive to get into spring/ summer weeks: we're talking a few thousand applicants for 50-100 places per insight internship; but LSE gives you probably the best chance if you want it.

As for teaching and exams, I can only speak for economics- if you're not good at maths, and fast at picking things up then it's a struggle. Most people have further maths etc.

Generally a fun place to be at though- but if you're not at least considering a corporate career it can be really stifling.

As for student satisfaction- the majority are slightly arrogant types applying for IB also stressed about maths- what do you expect?
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huncho4jack
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(Original post by SiriusBlack54)
Look- if you want to work in banking, a city law firm, or accounting- there isn't really a competition, LSE has nearly double the career intake of anywhere else despite being a third to a quarter of the size.

Investment banking (IB) analyst London intake was 15% LSE in 2017, and 20% in 2016- the next best was UCL at 7%.

It is still very competitive to get into spring/ summer weeks: we're talking a few thousand applicants for 50-100 places per insight internship; but LSE gives you probably the best chance if you want it.

As for teaching and exams, I can only speak for economics- if you're not good at maths, and fast at picking things up then it's a struggle. Most people have further maths etc.

Generally a fun place to be at though- but if you're not at least considering a corporate career it can be really stifling.

As for student satisfaction- the majority are slightly arrogant types applying for IB also stressed about maths- what do you expect?
LSE doesn't do well because it's LSE, it just has so many people applying from there. You have an equal chance at places like Warwick and UCL and you'll actually meet a more diverse types of people.

If anything, you may be at a disadvantage, seeing as for each job they'll only accept a few from each uni.
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||Techie||
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(Original post by huncho4jack)
LSE doesn't do well because it's LSE, it just has so many people applying from there. You have an equal chance at places like Warwick and UCL and you'll actually meet a more diverse types of people.

If anything, you may be at a disadvantage, seeing as for each job they'll only accept a few from each uni.
This is complete bs, where do you get info that they have quotas per uni?
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huncho4jack
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(Original post by ||Techie||)
This is complete bs, where do you get info that they have quotas per uni?
Well a bank is obviously not going to take in lots of people from one uni as they'd want at least a slightly diverse cohort. And given how competitive LSE students are, it only makes it harder.

LSE is very overrated at undergrad level, im willing to bet the applications to offer ratio is pretty low even if raw numbers are high.
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