NHS offers smear test to people without a cervix... good idea ? Watch

the bear
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https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/534109...hout-a-cervix/

i do not know if people without prostates are being offered prostate check-ups ? :dontknow:
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Dez
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Relying on an automated system to determine what appointments you go to is a bit silly, especially when you are by defintion a statistical anomaly. Presumably there is no issue with a trans person just booking their screening appointment manually instead.
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Puddles the Monkey
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The Sun is misrepresenting this story. The leaflet is here and clearly tells people that they need to speak to their GP about accessing appropriate screening. Otherwise if you're registered as female you'll get automated invitations to cervical screenings etc. and if you're registered as male you won't get those automated invitations.
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Napp
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I feel i am supposed to be morally outraged about something here, can anyone point me in the right direction?
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username521617
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(Original post by Puddles the Monkey)
The Sun is misrepresenting this story. The leaflet is here and clearly tells people that they need to speak to their GP about accessing appropriate screening. Otherwise if you're registered as female you'll get automated invitations to cervical screenings etc. and if you're registered as male you won't get those automated invitations.
It would be less complicated if people just stay registered as the sex they actually are rather than the sex they want to be.

A person can't really change their biological sex. A trans man isn't technically male, so it makes no sense medically to register that person as male.

I've said before that this would lead to confusion.
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Puddles the Monkey
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(Original post by Dandaman1)
It would be less complicated if people just stay registered as the sex they actually are rather than the sex they want to be.

A person can't really change their biological sex. A trans man isn't technically male, so it makes no sense medically to register that person as male.

I've said before that this would lead to confusion.
It's not really that complicated or confusing - all the leaflet is doing is letting people know that they need arrange appointments through their GP.

It's also not as clear cut as you are implying - for example, transgender women need to go for an annual mammogram if they are on hormone replacement therapy as they are at an increased risk of breast cancer, so even if they did register as male then they would still need to arrange this individuallly.
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ChaoticButterfly
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(Original post by Puddles the Monkey)
The Sun is misrepresenting this story.
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username521617
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(Original post by Puddles the Monkey)
It's not really that complicated or confusing - all the leaflet is doing is letting people know that they need arrange appointments through their GP.

It's also not as clear cut as you are implying - for example, transgender women need to go for an annual mammogram if they are on hormone replacement therapy as they are at an increased risk of breast cancer, so even if they did register as male then they would still need to arrange this individuallly.
If a patient is having hormone replacement therapy, then annual mammograms would (or at least should) be on their file anyway if it is a regular necessity that comes with the treatment.

If a trans woman is having to manually schedule appointments concerning male medical needs due to being registered as female, this is just an unnecessary inconvenience caused by inaccurate sex registration. It might also cause other complications, like getting the wrong medication or emergency medical care, identification issues after death and of remains, and so on. It's just easier (and potentially safer) if sex is documented accurately.

A trans woman is not a female and that person's files and registered identity should represent this despite personal feelings.
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Dez
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(Original post by Dandaman1)
If a patient is having hormone replacement therapy, then annual mammograms would (or at least should) be on their file anyway if it is a regular necessity that comes with the treatment.

If a trans woman is having to manually schedule appointments concerning male medical needs due to being registered as female, this is just an unnecessary inconvenience caused by inaccurate sex registration.
Why exactly do you care so much about someone else's medical treatment? So long as they are aware of what treatments they need to manually register for, which the NHS is informing them of via leaflets as per the article, there's not really any issue.

(Original post by Dandaman1)
It might also cause other complications, like getting the wrong medication or emergency medical care, identification issues after death and of remains, and so on. It's just easier (and potentially safer) if sex is documented accurately.

A trans woman is not a female and that person's files and registered identity should represent this despite personal feelings.
Now you're just being obstinate for no reason. There are practically no medications that are gender (or sex) specific. Emergency care is also incredibly unlikely to be an issue, and even if it was a 30-second conversation would instantly clear up any confusion. And the idea that being trans would lead to problems identifying your remains is also totally ludicrous, I've no idea where you've pulled that one out from. :erm:
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Puddles the Monkey
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(Original post by Dandaman1)
If a trans woman is having to manually schedule appointments concerning male medical needs due to being registered as female, this is just an unnecessary inconvenience caused by inaccurate sex registration. It might also cause other complications, like getting the wrong medication or emergency medical care, identification issues after death and of remains, and so on. It's just easier (and potentially safer) if sex is documented accurately.
You always have to book your appointment manually.... the system is just about sending reminders. :lol: And the leaflet is about making sure that people speak to their GP so that they access the appropriate care for them. It's really not a big deal.
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username521617
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(Original post by Dez)
Why exactly do you care so much about someone else's medical treatment? So long as they are aware of what treatments they need to manually register for, which the NHS is informing them of via leaflets as per the article, there's not really any issue.



Now you're just being obstinate for no reason. There are practically no medications that are gender (or sex) specific. Emergency care is also incredibly unlikely to be an issue, and even if it was a 30-second conversation would instantly clear up any confusion. And the idea that being trans would lead to problems identifying your remains is also totally ludicrous, I've no idea where you've pulled that one out from. :erm:
Sex is relevant to a person's medical care, which is one of the reasons it is on their documents and in their file. If a person can just change it, what's the point of it being there?

Drugs affect sexes differently. What if an unconscious trans man is given the wrong dosage of something in the emergency room? What if a pharmacist or pharmacy provides an incorrect concentration of medicine? Having inaccurate personal information could range from mildly inconvenient to potentially causing medical complications for no good reason.

The sex information is not there for the patient; it's there for the healthcare provider and relevant authorities. It should have nothing to do with the patient's preference, but instead the information's factual accuracy. We can thank administrators, bureaucrats and the trans lobby for this happening, as it makes little sense practically or logically.
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Dez
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(Original post by Dandaman1)
Sex is relevant to a person's medical care, which is one of the reasons it is on their documents and in their file. If a person can just change it, what's the point of it being there?
If a person has changed their sex, that would also be in their medical file…

(Original post by Dandaman1)
Drugs affect sexes differently. What if an unconscious trans man is given the wrong dosage of something in the emergency room?What if a pharmacist or pharmacy provides an incorrect concentration of medicine? Having inaccurate personal information could range from mildly inconvenient to potentially causing medical complications for no good reason.
Do you have any documented incidents of this happening? Because I seriously doubt it has. What sort of drugs do you imagine A&E nurses are injecting into unconscious, unaccompanied patients? Because my betting is not many, not because there's a risk of getting the patient's sex wrong but because of potential allergies or other adverse reactions to the medication. The only reason they would ignore those risks is if the outcome would be far worse without the medication (i.e. the patient is at death's door), in which case it really doesn't matter if the dosage makes them a bit sick afterward.

And pharmacists give out medicine based on doctor instructions, who would have access to the patient's file and know that they have transitioned.

(Original post by Dandaman1)
The sex information is not there for the patient; it's there for the healthcare provider and relevant authorities. It should have nothing to do with the patient's preference, but instead the information's factual accuracy.
"Preference"? Are you for real? :lolwut: Going through years of hormone therapy, psychological exams and various operations is a bit more than just having a "preference". It's a very major change which obviously needs to be made plain in the patient's medical records.

(Original post by Dandaman1)
We can thank administrators, bureaucrats and the trans lobby for this happening, as it makes little sense practically or logically.
You're the one spouting impractical and illogical nonsense here, not the medical community.
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username521617
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(Original post by Dez)
If a person has changed their sex, that would also be in their medical file…



Do you have any documented incidents of this happening? Because I seriously doubt it has. What sort of drugs do you imagine A&E nurses are injecting into unconscious, unaccompanied patients? Because my betting is not many, not because there's a risk of getting the patient's sex wrong but because of potential allergies or other adverse reactions to the medication. The only reason they would ignore those risks is if the outcome would be far worse without the medication (i.e. the patient is at death's door), in which case it really doesn't matter if the dosage makes them a bit sick afterward.

And pharmacists give out medicine based on doctor instructions, who would have access to the patient's file and know that they have transitioned.



"Preference"? Are you for real? :lolwut: Going through years of hormone therapy, psychological exams and various operations is a bit more than just having a "preference". It's a very major change which obviously needs to be made plain in the patient's medical records.



You're the one spouting impractical and illogical nonsense here, not the medical community.
Having transitions in their medical history obviously didn't stop people from getting the wrong reminders, though, now did it?

Transsexuals are such a small minority of the population I doubt I could find many examples of mix-ups that actually made the news. I could research it and look through news archives, but I don't care enough. All that matters is it potentially could happen, and for literally no good reason.

And pharmacists don't just fill bottles to doctor's specifications. They themselves often make recommendations, judge dosages based on written information about the patient, and so on. They actually have some decision-making responsibilities. If they have inaccurate information about a patient or client, then who knows what could happen.

Sex is changed due preference. A trans man is not a male, and the information and identification would normally reflect that. If it is changed, it is done so because of a person's choice of of identity and not any real change in their biology.

Why am I the only one here who thinks having the correct bloody information on a person's paperwork is probably a good idea?
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Dez
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(Original post by Dandaman1)
Having transitions in their medical history obviously didn't stop people from getting the wrong reminders, though, now did it?
Yes and clearly the NHS is grinding to a halt due to a few hundred misprinted letters.

(Original post by Dandaman1)
Transsexuals are such a small minority of the population I doubt I could find many examples of mix-ups that actually made the news. I could research it and look through news archives, but I don't care enough. All that matters is it potentially could happen, and for literally no good reason.
Point is, the risk involved is so tiny I seriously doubt having a different sex on a medical record is ever likely to be a major issue for emergency treatment.

(Original post by Dandaman1)
And pharmacists don't just fill bottles to doctor's specifications. They themselves often make recommendations, judge dosages based on written information about the patient, and so on. They actually have some decision-making responsibilities. If they have inaccurate information about a patient or client, then who knows what could happen.
Likely not a lot. In the unlikely event this was potentially an issue, the doctor giving the prescription could simply make a note about it.

(Original post by Dandaman1)
Sex is changed due preference. A trans man is not a male, and the information and identification would normally reflect that. If it is changed, it is done so because of a person's choice of of identity and not any real change in their biology.
If you think transitioning involves "no real change in biology" then you are seriously misinformed. Very ironically so since you were arguing just now that different sexes could react differently to the same medication.

(Original post by Dandaman1)
Why am I the only one here who thinks having the correct bloody information on a person's paperwork is probably a good idea?
The information is all there, it's not like the NHS is going back and redacting any previous info on trans peoples' records of them being a different sex. It seems to me you care less about the quality of treatment being received and more about what categorisation confirms your ignorant biases the most.
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username521617
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(Original post by Dez)
Yes and clearly the NHS is grinding to a halt due to a few hundred misprinted letters.



Point is, the risk involved is so tiny I seriously doubt having a different sex on a medical record is ever likely to be a major issue for emergency treatment.



Likely not a lot. In the unlikely event this was potentially an issue, the doctor giving the prescription could simply make a note about it.



If you think transitioning involves "no real change in biology" then you are seriously misinformed. Very ironically so since you were arguing just now that different sexes could react differently to the same medication.



The information is all there, it's not like the NHS is going back and redacting any previous info on trans peoples' records of them being a different sex. It seems to me you care less about the quality of treatment being received and more about what categorisation confirms your ignorant biases the most.
Transitioning does not change a person's biological sex. It only changes their sex visually (not always very well) and on paper, and it was the latter to which I was referring when I mentioned changing sex. I don't see what "irony" you are talking about. A trans man is still female, therefore will require medication and doses tailored to females when it's important, and anything else applicable. I am arguing that factually inaccurate identity information may potentially cause complications unless their information is clear and accurately represents physiological reality which it should do regardless.

I am the one who cares about quality of treatment here. I am the one who doesn't want potential mix-ups and mistakes. That's what I'm prioritising: common sense, safety and accuracy. You, trans advocates and lobbyists, however, seem to care only about protecting people's feelings and the promotion of pro-trans ideology. Social politics should simply stay out of these matters.

Trans women, for example, are not female and nothing in their medical files, official documents or records should state anything other than male. I don't care if that upsets anyone, because that's not what's important.

End of conversation.
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ChaoticButterfly
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(Original post by Dandaman1)


Trans women, for example, are not female and nothing in their medical files, official documents or records should state anything other than male. I don't care if that upsets anyone, because that's not what's important.

End of conversation.
Lets be honest. Poeple like you revel in trying to upset people. Espceially people who are treated terribly and have the highest suicide rates. Anything to trigger the libs.

The difference between gender and biological sex is at the core of all the science and philosophy surrounding the debate on gender dysphoria. This difference is the whole point of it all. The fact that you can be bioligcally male but still identify as a woman is the whole point.

You aren't clever, you aren't tripping up the "trans lobby", you are just a **** head.
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