Does anyone else not know there times tables? Watch

anonstudent2017
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#1
I'm in my final year of college studying Computer science, maths and further maths and still cannot fully recite all of the times tables. I think it's because i've never needed them as I can use a calculator in 13 of my 14 past / future exams.

Anyone else?
0
reply
Zoqua
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 year ago
#2
(Original post by anonstudent2017)
I'm in my final year of college studying Computer science, maths and further maths and still cannot fully recite all of the times tables. I think it's because i've never needed them as I can use a calculator in 13 of my 14 past / future exams.

Anyone else?
Dam that's bad, I know the 1-17 off the top of my head, and can basically do any others in a few seconds, but Mental Speed is basically my thing. They are not hard to learn, especially if your doing further maths, as you must be pretty good. You can learn the 1-14 times tables off by heart in less than an hour if you apply yourself.
0
reply
DrawTheLine
  • Community Assistant
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#3
Report 1 year ago
#3
I struggle to do many things in my head as I'm a visual person, I always need to write what I'm thinking down in order to keep track. I can do most of them 1-12, however for some of them it may take a few seconds for me to picture it and then know the answer. It's really bad but I just can't keep track of stuff in my head, I need to see it in order to do it.
2
reply
Minerva
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 year ago
#4
(Original post by anonstudent2017)
I'm in my final year of college studying Computer science, maths and further maths and still cannot fully recite all of the times tables. I think it's because i've never needed them as I can use a calculator in 13 of my 14 past / future exams.

Anyone else?
And what happens if you have no calculator? To be unable to do your three times table, never mind twelve or higher, is nothing to boast about. I am old enough to think that this inability reflects very badly on the teaching you have had. I use calculators and spreadsheets all the time but I can still recite my tables, though I'm not going to tell how long it is since I learned them :tongue:.
1
reply
anonstudent2017
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#5
(Original post by Minerva)
And what happens if you have no calculator? To be unable to do your three times table, never mind twelve or higher, is nothing to boast about. I am old enough to think that this inability reflects very badly on the teaching you have had. I use calculators and spreadsheets all the time but I can still recite my tables, though I'm not going to tell how long it is since I learned them :tongue:.
Apart from my Core 1 exam last summer I will always be allowed my calculator in exams. And as for real life I will always have access to some form of calculator. The only times tables I can not recite is 4, 6, 7, 8, 9.

(My Core 1 exam involved a lot of times tables written down the side of the page)
0
reply
Tiger Rag
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#6
Report 1 year ago
#6
(Original post by anonstudent2017)
Apart from my Core 1 exam last summer I will always be allowed my calculator in exams. And as for real life I will always have access to some form of calculator. The only times tables I can not recite is 4, 6, 7, 8, 9.

(My Core 1 exam involved a lot of times tables written down the side of the page)
If you know 2, you should know 4 & 8.
0
reply
UWS
  • Answer Heroes
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#7
Report 1 year ago
#7
Did Computer Science too. I know up to 14 and I can do simple multiplications in my head but we were allowed to use a calculator in our exams so it didn't really matter.
0
reply
anonstudent2017
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#8
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#8
(Original post by Tiger Rag)
If you know 2, you should know 4 & 8.
With thought and time yeah, but I could not simply write the answer to say 7*8
0
reply
applesforme
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#9
Report 1 year ago
#9
you don't seem to know your there and their.
2
reply
Acsel
  • Community Assistant
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#10
Report 1 year ago
#10
So you can't do something incredibly basic (this is not meant to be offensive, it's simply a fact) and the reason you never learned is because you always had access to a calculator (which is slower than simply knowing the answers). So what are the next logical steps? Being unable to write because you always have access to a computer? Being unable to use a map because Google Maps is always on your phone?

These are incredibly basic, everyday skills and there's no benefit to not knowing them. Sure, you might always have a calculator to hand but that doesn't really excuse a lack of basic skills. And despite what you may think, it will start to hurt you. Not to mention it'll really start to bother you when people look down on you for being unable to do basic arithmetic (and that will happen too). How's it going to look when you see a label saying 40% off or your boss offers to double your pay and you need a calculator to work it out? That's what will happen. And it already has happened, as you say you don't know your multiplication tables because a calculator was readily available.
3
reply
applesforme
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#11
Report 1 year ago
#11
(Original post by Acsel)
So what are the next logical steps? Being unable to write because you always have access to a computer? Being unable to use a map because Google Maps is always on your phone?

These are incredibly basic, everyday skills and there's no benefit to not knowing them.
can you grow fruits and vegetables from a seed? can you hunt and prepare a wild animal? can you fish? can you build a waterproof, warm, and sturdy shelter? can you make a fire on a cold and wet winter day? I doubt it...but you are having a go at him for being reliant on calculators and google maps. we are all guilty of not knowing basic knowledge.
1
reply
Rowan.c
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#12
Report 1 year ago
#12
Im in year 13 and I still don't kow them, it's a real pain and i despise maths as i have always had a bad run with it.
As with anything its repetition in learning that does the trick. I'm putting the effort in for maths for the first time and I am improving, so if you too are struggling, maybe just start for 10-20 minutes a night and write them out and re-read them in a rhythm / rhyming voice to get it stuck in your head.
1
reply
Snoozinghamster
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#13
Report 1 year ago
#13
I also do further maths, I’m awful at my times tables I just know a lot of tricks to avoid needing it. Eg 11* any thing bigger than 10. Do *10 first then add the number.
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
1
reply
anonstudent2017
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#14
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#14
(Original post by Acsel)
So you can't do something incredibly basic (this is not meant to be offensive, it's simply a fact) and the reason you never learned is because you always had access to a calculator (which is slower than simply knowing the answers). So what are the next logical steps? Being unable to write because you always have access to a computer? Being unable to use a map because Google Maps is always on your phone?

These are incredibly basic, everyday skills and there's no benefit to not knowing them. Sure, you might always have a calculator to hand but that doesn't really excuse a lack of basic skills. And despite what you may think, it will start to hurt you. Not to mention it'll really start to bother you when people look down on you for being unable to do basic arithmetic (and that will happen too). How's it going to look when you see a label saying 40% off or your boss offers to double your pay and you need a calculator to work it out? That's what will happen. And it already has happened, as you say you don't know your multiplication tables because a calculator was readily available.
I'm not complete stupid I could work out 40% of a number and have perfected my doubling skills. I prefer hand written to typing and can read a map quite fine but you have got to agree that google maps can traverse a map in milliseconds where the same traversal by hand would take hours. My unconditional uni course for computer science allows calculators so there is no point learning something that I will most likely never be put on the spot for. Although I agree being able to recall products would be an ideal skill.
0
reply
Acsel
  • Community Assistant
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#15
Report 1 year ago
#15
(Original post by petalsunrise)
can you grow fruits and vegetables from a seed? can you hunt and prepare a wild animal? can you fish? can you build a waterproof, warm, and sturdy shelter? can you make a fire on a cold and wet winter day? I doubt it...but you are having a go at him for being reliant on calculators and google maps. we are all guilty of not knowing basic knowledge.
There are some pretty key differences there though. None of the things you mentioned are likely to be necessary in everyday life. The reason most people don't know the things you listed is not simply because technology renders them unnecessary but because technology renders them inefficient. It would not be efficient or necessary for me to hunt wild animals for food or create shelter. It is however necessary in everyday life to use basic arithmetic.

Or to put it a more blunt way, not knowing your multiplication tables is an issue of laziness. Rather than learn them they would rather reach for a calculator. Not being able to fish or make a shelter is not an easy of laziness, it's an issue of practicality. It is practical and useful to know your times tables. It is not practical and arguably only useful if you really need it to do any of the things you mentioned.
0
reply
It's****ingWOODY
  • Political Ambassador
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#16
Report 1 year ago
#16
2 + 2 = 4 - 1 = 3

^^ Quick maths
1
reply
Acsel
  • Community Assistant
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#17
Report 1 year ago
#17
(Original post by anonstudent2017)
I'm not complete stupid I could work out 40% of a number and have perfected my doubling skills. I prefer hand written to typing and can read a map quite fine but you have got to agree that google maps can traverse a map in milliseconds where the same traversal by hand would take hours. My unconditional uni course for computer science allows calculators so there is no point learning something that I will most likely never be put on the spot for. Although I agree being able to recall products would be an ideal skill.
I apologise if I implied that you were stupid, that wasn't at all my intention.

The map example is a more practical one. Contrary to popular belief, you don't always have access to a sat nav or phone with internet connection. Nor is it a good idea to follow them blindly. The ability to read maps and by extension road signs rather than just relying on the technology is important. You're completely right that using Google Maps is faster. But that doesn't mean that you can't learn to read a map as well. It's not one or the other.

It's not about whether you can use a calculator all the time, or whether you'll ever be put on the spot for it. It's a matter of you're giving up a rather basic skill because technology means you don't need it. Another really big example (and this one does affect people) is that reliance on autocorrect and spell checkers means many people can't spell. They rely too much on the technology, when in reality they should be perfectly capable by themselves and simply use technology to augment it. The same applies for using a calculator rather than learning your multiplication tables. Why would you not simply learn them (I don't see why you didn't learn them in primary school) and then use the technology when it's necessary? Instead of total reliance on the technology. Because if you're willing to rely on technology for something so simple, it stands to reason that you would rely on technology for other simple tasks as well.
0
reply
anonstudent2017
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#18
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#18
(Original post by Acsel)
I apologise if I implied that you were stupid, that wasn't at all my intention.

The map example is a more practical one. Contrary to popular belief, you don't always have access to a sat nav or phone with internet connection. Nor is it a good idea to follow them blindly. The ability to read maps and by extension road signs rather than just relying on the technology is important. You're completely right that using Google Maps is faster. But that doesn't mean that you can't learn to read a map as well. It's not one or the other.

It's not about whether you can use a calculator all the time, or whether you'll ever be put on the spot for it. It's a matter of you're giving up a rather basic skill because technology means you don't need it. Another really big example (and this one does affect people) is that reliance on autocorrect and spell checkers means many people can't spell. They rely too much on the technology, when in reality they should be perfectly capable by themselves and simply use technology to augment it. The same applies for using a calculator rather than learning your multiplication tables. Why would you not simply learn them (I don't see why you didn't learn them in primary school) and then use the technology when it's necessary? Instead of total reliance on the technology. Because if you're willing to rely on technology for something so simple, it stands to reason that you would rely on technology for other simple tasks as well.
I see your point.

Spoiler:
Show

I also heavily rely on auto correct and my primary schools main objective was to persuade kids to attend. (Not from a great area)
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • University of Birmingham
    Postgraduate Open Day Postgraduate
    Wed, 20 Mar '19
  • King's College London
    Postgraduate Taught Courses - Arts & Sciences - Strand Campus Postgraduate
    Wed, 20 Mar '19
  • University of East Anglia
    All Departments Open 13:00-17:00. Find out more about our diverse range of subject areas and career progression in the Arts & Humanities, Social Sciences, Medicine & Health Sciences, and the Sciences. Postgraduate
    Wed, 20 Mar '19

Where do you need more help?

Which Uni should I go to? (35)
14.29%
How successful will I become if I take my planned subjects? (21)
8.57%
How happy will I be if I take this career? (50)
20.41%
How do I achieve my dream Uni placement? (36)
14.69%
What should I study to achieve my dream career? (30)
12.24%
How can I be the best version of myself? (73)
29.8%

Watched Threads

View All