man111111
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Can someone please explain this to me?
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COYS...TTID
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6.02x10^23 it’s the number of particles which makes up a mole of a substance
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man111111
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(Original post by COYS...TTID)
6.02x10^23 it’s the number of particles which makes up a mole of a substance
do you mind explaining this in more detail
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COYS...TTID
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I don’t really know why it’s that number, but when a ‘mole of a substance (eg electrons,ions, atoms, molecules)’ is mentioned it means that there are that many number of particles in it. Best I can do :/
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man111111
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(Original post by man111111)
Can someone please explain this to me?
a diagram might help me understand it
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Eimmanuel
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(Original post by man111111)
a diagram might help me understand it

Avogadro Constant is just a number. I don't know what diagram can help you to understand. Your question is like asking someone for a diagram to explain what is the number 0.

The following links would describe the constant more.

https://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Avogadro_constant

https://www.khanacademy.org/science/...gadro-s-number

If you are asking why is Avogadro constant is 6.022 ×1023. Then it is totally a different story or question.
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Dudee Daa
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It's a special number where if you multiply a molecule's atomic mass by that number, you have an amount of stuff that weighs that much in grams

So if I had 6x10^23 atoms of hydrogen (atomic mass 1) it would weigh 1 gram

If I had 6x10^23 molecules of carbon dioxide (atomic mass 6+8+8 = 24) it would weigh 24 grams
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deltagolf
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It's simply a special number as is Pi. The Avogadro Constant is the number, 6.02x10^23.
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Seffire
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You know how we have grams and metres and all that? they're just agreed upon units to make our measurements easier.
Moles are another unit. Think of it as a special unit that everyone agrees on. What Avogadro's number means is that in one mole of a substance, there are 6.02x10^23 number of particles. That's all that means
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AmmarTa
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I don't think a diagram with an Avogadro's number of molecules would be a particularly good idea 😂
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Joinedup
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You could think of it as a scale factor allowing you to scale up or down between the world of the masses of single atoms and molecules (in amu) and the everyday world of sensible amounts (i.e. some number of grams) of matter.

e.g.
1 mole of carbon has a mass of 12g which is the same thing as saying the number of atoms in 12g of carbon is 6.02x10^23

so you can work out that the mass of a single carbon atom is 12/(6.02x10^23) (in grams)



...so what dubdee said above
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MSmith90
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How much is a dozen? 12
How much is a mole? 6.02 x 10^23

If I had one dozen carbon atoms, how many carbon atoms would I have? 12

If I had two dozen carbon atoms, how many carbon atoms would I have? 24

If I had one mole carbon atoms, how many carbon atoms would I have? 6.02 x 10^23

If I had two moles of carbon atoms, how many carbon atoms would I have? 2 x 6.02 x 10^23



Avogadro's constant is 6.02 x 10^23
Just like a dozen is 12

Hope that clears it up a bit
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man111111
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(Original post by Seffire)
You know how we have grams and metres and all that? they're just agreed upon units to make our measurements easier.
Moles are another unit. Think of it as a special unit that everyone agrees on. What Avogadro's number means is that in one mole of a substance, there are 6.02x10^23 number of particles. That's all that means
what is a mole?
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man111111
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(Original post by Joinedup)
You could think of it as a scale factor allowing you to scale up or down between the world of the masses of single atoms and molecules (in amu) and the everyday world of sensible amounts (i.e. some number of grams) of matter.

e.g.
1 mole of carbon has a mass of 12g which is the same thing as saying the number of atoms in 12g of carbon is 6.02x10^23

so you can work out that the mass of a single carbon atom is 12/(6.02x10^23) (in grams)



...so what dubdee said above
what is a mole?
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man111111
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(Original post by MSmith90)
How much is a dozen? 12
How much is a mole? 6.02 x 10^23

If I had one dozen carbon atoms, how many carbon atoms would I have? 12

If I had two dozen carbon atoms, how many carbon atoms would I have? 24

If I had one mole carbon atoms, how many carbon atoms would I have? 6.02 x 10^23

If I had two moles of carbon atoms, how many carbon atoms would I have? 2 x 6.02 x 10^23



Avogadro's constant is 6.02 x 10^23
Just like a dozen is 12

Hope that clears it up a bit
what is a mole?
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Joinedup
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(Original post by man111111)
what is a mole?
When you have Avagadro's number of a thing... then that's a mole of that thing.

e.g. you could go to the sweet shop and ask for a mole of yorkie bars... you'd need very big pockets though because it'd be 6.023 × 1023 yorkies
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Seffire
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(Original post by man111111)
what is a mole?
If I asked you "what is a gram?" how would you answer my question?
it's simply a unit of measurement. People have agreed that when they want to talk about amounts of things in chemistry, they can count how many "moles" of something there are instead of counting how many "grams" there are. It's just a unit of measurement, nothing more.
It just so happens that when you have one "mole" of a substance, as in one unit of measurement of something, you're going to have 6.02x10^23 particles there.
if you still don't get what mole is, I suggest ask someone face to face, that conversation will definitely be more helpful than some strangers desperately trying to explain it over a forum.
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man111111
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(Original post by Seffire)
If I asked you "what is a gram?" how would you answer my question?
it's simply a unit of measurement. People have agreed that when they want to talk about amounts of things in chemistry, they can count how many "moles" of something there are instead of counting how many "grams" there are. It's just a unit of measurement, nothing more.
It just so happens that when you have one "mole" of a substance, as in one unit of measurement of something, you're going to have 6.02x10^23 particles there.
if you still don't get what mole is, I suggest ask someone face to face, that conversation will definitely be more helpful than some strangers desperately trying to explain it over a forum.
so can i say that a carbon atom is a mole (that has 6.023 × 1023 particles). hmm, this doesn't really sound right. how can a carbon atom have 6.023 × 1023 particles? in addition can i say CO2 has 3 moles with (3 x (6.023 × 1023)) particles
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man111111
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(Original post by Joinedup)
When you have Avagadro's number of a thing... then that's a mole of that thing.

e.g. you could go to the sweet shop and ask for a mole of yorkie bars... you'd need very big pockets though because it'd be 6.023 × 1023 yorkies
so can i say that a carbon atom is a mole (that has 6.023 × 1023 particles). hmm, this doesn't really sound right. how can a carbon atom have 6.023 × 1023 particles? in addition can i say CO2 has 3 moles with (3 x (6.023 × 1023)) particles
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Babs_010
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(Original post by man111111)
Can someone please explain this to me?
This is a measure of the number of particles (atoms, ions, or molecules) contained within a substance. One mole of any substance contains the same number of particles, and this is the number 6.023 * 10^23. This why it is known as the Avogadro constant. It does not change.

btw... the mass of one mole of any substance is equal to its relative formula or atomic mass.
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