Prescription costs at uni

Watch
millea1
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#1
Hi there - I have three daughters all just turned 19 and all in full time education. Two of my daughters have Diabetes Type - 1 so I have applied (via their doctor) for the prescription charge exemption cert for them, but my other daughter will now have to pay for her prescriptions. I think this is so wrong as a) this only applies to England (another example of postcode lottery) and as she is a student (earning nothing) it will mean I am paying for her prescriptions as she has no income. Surely prescription charges should be means tested so If you are working and earning and have no long term medical condition - you pay for prescriptions and if you are a student, unemployed, receiving DLA or on a pension - you don't. That would seem fairer - if you are going to charge for prescriptions at all.
0
reply
Kindred
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#2
Report 2 years ago
#2
(Original post by millea1)
Hi there - I have three daughters all just turned 19 and all in full time education. Two of my daughters have Diabetes Type - 1 so I have applied (via their doctor) for the prescription charge exemption cert for them, but my other daughter will now have to pay for her prescriptions. I think this is so wrong as a) this only applies to England (another example of postcode lottery) and as she is a student (earning nothing) it will mean I am paying for her prescriptions as she has no income. Surely prescription charges should be means tested so If you are working and earning and have no long term medical condition - you pay for prescriptions and if you are a student, unemployed, receiving DLA or on a pension - you don't. That would seem fairer - if you are going to charge for prescriptions at all.
There are forms for free prescriptions on low income. I don't know if students recieving SF count since SF could be seen as income. Worth looking into. You can ask at a pharmacy for a form. Her uni student support may be able to advise on if it's a possibility. You can also take a look on the NHS website for prescription charges and exemptions.
0
reply
PandaWho
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#3
Report 2 years ago
#3
(Original post by Kindred)
There are forms for free prescriptions on low income. I don't know if students recieving SF count since SF could be seen as income. Worth looking into. You can ask at a pharmacy for a form. Her uni student support may be able to advise on if it's a possibility. You can also take a look on the NHS website for prescription charges and exemptions.
I got free prescriptions through this form as a uni student. It takes into account the individuals (not families) income and any outgoings such as rent and stuff. It’s always worth applying
0
reply
Kindred
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#4
Report 2 years ago
#4
(Original post by millea1)
Hi there - I have three daughters all just turned 19 and all in full time education. Two of my daughters have Diabetes Type - 1 so I have applied (via their doctor) for the prescription charge exemption cert for them, but my other daughter will now have to pay for her prescriptions. I think this is so wrong as a) this only applies to England (another example of postcode lottery) and as she is a student (earning nothing) it will mean I am paying for her prescriptions as she has no income. Surely prescription charges should be means tested so If you are working and earning and have no long term medical condition - you pay for prescriptions and if you are a student, unemployed, receiving DLA or on a pension - you don't. That would seem fairer - if you are going to charge for prescriptions at all.
Thought you might like to see what PandaWho has added. Apparently with the low income exception for prescriptions they will take a student's financial situation into account so if your daughter doesn't have enough money to afford prescriptions without your help it could be worth trying that.
Also, if she needs regular prescriptions you may want to look into weather a pre-payment card would be cost effective. It could save money depending on how many prescriptions she needs.

By the way, I'm going to move this discussion into a sparkly new thread for you since it's currently on the tail of an old thread. It just tends to get confusing or mean you don't get many responses if you bump an old thread.

(Original post by PandaWho)
I got free prescriptions through this form as a uni student. It takes into account the individuals (not families) income and any outgoings such as rent and stuff. It’s always worth applying
Thanks. That's really helpful to know. I've never been sure with the whole student thing.
0
reply
chelseadagg3r
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#5
Report 2 years ago
#5
(Original post by Kindred)
There are forms for free prescriptions on low income. I don't know if students recieving SF count since SF could be seen as income. Worth looking into. You can ask at a pharmacy for a form. Her uni student support may be able to advise on if it's a possibility. You can also take a look on the NHS website for prescription charges and exemptions.
Student finance is counted on the forms, but even getting the max loan and a disability benefit my income totalled little enough that I was eligible for full health costs

(Original post by millea1)
Hi there - I have three daughters all just turned 19 and all in full time education. Two of my daughters have Diabetes Type - 1 so I have applied (via their doctor) for the prescription charge exemption cert for them, but my other daughter will now have to pay for her prescriptions. I think this is so wrong as a) this only applies to England (another example of postcode lottery) and as she is a student (earning nothing) it will mean I am paying for her prescriptions as she has no income. Surely prescription charges should be means tested so If you are working and earning and have no long term medical condition - you pay for prescriptions and if you are a student, unemployed, receiving DLA or on a pension - you don't. That would seem fairer - if you are going to charge for prescriptions at all.
Hi! Your daughter needs to track down a HC1 form to apply for the HC2 (full help with costs) or HC3 (partial help with costs) certificate. It will take into account all of her earnings, including student finance, but may result in her being awarded full help with health costs (including dental, optician, and prescription charges). You can download the form to print off here (and read more about the scheme): https://www.nhsbsa.nhs.uk/nhs-low-income-scheme. You can also pick up a form from Citizen's Advice, job centres, GP surgeries and pharmacies

If you are receiving a means-tested benefit yourself and are eligible for help with health costs, they will be able to claim the same under your certificate (if you have one) until they are 20.
1
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Are you travelling in the Uni student travel window (3-9 Dec) to go home for Christmas?

Yes (113)
28.18%
No - I have already returned home (52)
12.97%
No - I plan on travelling outside these dates (80)
19.95%
No - I'm staying at my term time address over Christmas (39)
9.73%
No - I live at home during term anyway (117)
29.18%

Watched Threads

View All