AthenaSphinx
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#1
I was wondering, who actually determines the "quality of life"

Is it a doctor, parent, state, other health professionals or patient themselves. (what is the patient is not competent)
0
reply
Advertisement
AlanAnonymouss
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#2
Report 2 years ago
#2
Depends on many factors. Sometimes a patient won’t have the capacity to evaluate their own quality of life for many different reasons. I would say the doctor has the greatest influence on this evaluation though they would definitely look at the situation holistically.
0
reply
Arima
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#3
Report 2 years ago
#3
often a patient judges their own quality of life through certain tests/questions, theres a couple official ones out there... its the basis of whether healthcare professionals/pharmaceutical companies/NICE judge whether a therapy is worth the money - by how much it might increase the quality of life or by how many extra years added on. from my understanding anyway lol
0
reply
Advertisement
ecolier
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#4
Report 2 years ago
#4
(Original post by AthenaSphinx)
...
Good question - read below

(Original post by Arima)
...
Good answer, you are mostly correct. To ration expensive treatment in a system where a limited pot of money is available, NICE (National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence) uses a system called QALY - Quality Adjusted Life Year. It is assumed that 1 year lived with "full" Quality of Life is QALY = 1 and death is 0, while it is possible to have QoL worst than death = negative values.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Qualit...sted_life_year

The Quality of Life uses a survey called EQ-5D. It is usually self-administered by patients. Read https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/EQ-5D.

If you want to ask any more feel free!
1
reply
taysidefrog
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#5
Report 2 years ago
#5
What has this got to do with people thinking of studying medicine? This isn't a "get your medical ethics homework essays answered" forum.
0
reply
Advertisement
AthenaSphinx
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#6
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#6
(Original post by AlanAnonymouss)
Depends on many factors. Sometimes a patient won’t have the capacity to evaluate their own quality of life for many different reasons. I would say the doctor has the greatest influence on this evaluation though they would definitely look at the situation holistically.
Thank you, I get what you mean - doctors do have a large say especially when keeping the best interest of the patient in mind
0
reply
AthenaSphinx
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#7
(Original post by Arima)
often a patient judges their own quality of life through certain tests/questions, theres a couple official ones out there... its the basis of whether healthcare professionals/pharmaceutical companies/NICE judge whether a therapy is worth the money - by how much it might increase the quality of life or by how many extra years added on. from my understanding anyway lol
Thank you! What if the child was incompetent? Is that the QALY system/guideline idea (How much it might increase the quality of life/by ow many years QALY = 1, 1 extra year idea) ?
0
reply
Advertisement
AthenaSphinx
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#8
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#8
(Original post by ecolier)
Good question - read below



Good answer, you are mostly correct. To ration expensive treatment in a system where a limited pot of money is available, NICE (National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence) uses a system called QALY - Quality Adjusted Life Year. It is assumed that 1 year lived with "full" Quality of Life is QALY = 1 and death is 0, while it is possible to have QoL worst than death = negative values.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Qualit...sted_life_year

The Quality of Life uses a survey called EQ-5D. It is usually self-administered by patients. Read https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/EQ-5D.

If you want to ask any more feel free!
Thank you so much! I understand that NICE make sure that cost effective medication is on the market, other than that I had no idea of QALY, so a massive thank you to you!
I was wondering what guidelines could support a doctor making a decision to withdraw treatment/not give the treatment if it was decided by the QALY that it was not going to help the patient? (In the best interest of the patient)
There are so many guidelines - GMC, NICE etc.
0
reply
AthenaSphinx
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#9
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#9
(Original post by taysidefrog)
What has this got to do with people thinking of studying medicine? This isn't a "get your medical ethics homework essays answered" forum.
Ha haa, no I am not doing an essay on this question. This is a question I was thinking about and I wanted to see how others actually approach such a difficult question. We all have different view on who actually determines the quality of life of a patient - patient, parents, doctor, state, NHS, NICE etc. It is a very interesting question
0
reply
Advertisement
ecolier
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#10
Report 2 years ago
#10
(Original post by AthenaSphinx)
Thank you so much! I understand that NICE make sure that cost effective medication is on the market, other than that I had no idea of QALY, so a massive thank you to you!
I was wondering what guidelines could support a doctor making a decision to withdraw treatment/not give the treatment if it was decided by the QALY that it was not going to help the patient? (In the best interest of the patient)
There are so many guidelines - GMC, NICE etc.
Simply speaking, QALY is usually used to decide if it is worth make a drug available on the NHS in the first place (i.e. if the drug is available to be prescribed at all). After that if the drug is deemed cost-effective it will be part of the arsenal the doctors can prescribe (simplistically, even though the CCG will then need to approve etc. etc. but that will be out of your remit I'm sure, unless you are a Public Health registrar!).

Even if a drug is deemed not cost-effective, doctors can make individual funding request (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indivi...unding_Request) for the drug to be funded on the NHS for individual patients.

Obviously, if you are asking how the doctors can make that decision, it will usually be evidence-based and different for each drug / condition / patient! Feel free to ask any me more questions if unclear.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

New lockdown - Do you agree schools and universities should remain open?

Yes (42)
36.52%
No (59)
51.3%
I don't know (14)
12.17%

Watched Threads

View All