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    So my friend wants to use this extenuating circumstance to get into law school to make up for his poor gcses.

    his gcses were: BBCCCDDU

    His circumstance: His dog died during his gcses

    Is this a wise thing for him to do , he wants to do law and he said that this will help increase his chances alot , what do you guys think , does this count as extenuating circumstances ?
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    (Original post by Ray_Shadows)
    So my friend wants to use this extenuating circumstance to get into law school to make up for his poor gcses.

    his gcses were: BBCCCDDU

    His circumstance: His dog died during his gcses

    Is this a wise thing for him to do , he wants to do law and he said that this will help increase his chances alot , what do you guys think , does this count as extenuating circumstances ?
    If this is something that affected him a lot then unis may consider it. But he would need a lot of evidence to show that his performance was affected, and because it sounds trivial he may have difficulty obtaining this evidence. The best option is to initially discuss it with his teacher, as he would need their support to take it further.
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    (Original post by Juno)
    If this is something that affected him a lot then unis may consider it. But he would need a lot of evidence to show that his performance was affected, and because it sounds trivial he may have difficulty obtaining this evidence. The best option is to initially discuss it with his teacher, as he would need their support to take it further.
    i mean he was sad about it for a while , but i think me and my other friends noticed he was back to normal the week after (plus he has two dogs)

    what could he use as evidence ?
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    (Original post by Ray_Shadows)
    i mean he was sad about it for a while , but i think me and my other friends noticed he was back to normal the week after (plus he has two dogs)

    what could he use as evidence ?
    The fact that he has 2 dogs is irrelevant. You have 2 legs, but if I chopped one off you'd probably still be upset.

    Evidence would be things like a letter from his teacher, a letter from his parents, a letter from a doctor, a copy of his marks showing a dip after the event, a letter from the vet/crematorium etc.
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    No, it's certainly not a wise thing to do. It's such an incredibly trivial thing that if anything it'll hurt his application. It's going to be exceptionally difficult to get any proof that he was mentally affected. Even if he is able to get proof, some universities will simply look at it as him looking for an excuse.

    Rather than trying to find an excuse for his bad grades he should be taking responsibility and doing something about it, or making up for them. As a side note, they're not exceptionally bad and still meet the 5 A* to C requirement.
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    (Original post by Juno)
    The fact that he has 2 dogs is irrelevant. You have 2 legs, but if I chopped one off you'd probably still be upset.

    Evidence would be things like a letter from his teacher, a letter from his parents, a letter from a doctor, a copy of his marks showing a dip after the event, a letter from the vet/crematorium etc.
    ah yes he has some sort of documentation from the vet , hopefully this should be enough
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    (Original post by Ray_Shadows)
    ah yes he has some sort of documentation from the vet , hopefully this should be enough
    That's a good start, but he would still need some other documents to prove how it affected him.
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    (Original post by Acsel)
    No, it's certainly not a wise thing to do. It's such an incredibly trivial thing that if anything it'll hurt his application. It's going to be exceptionally difficult to get any proof that he was mentally affected. Even if he is able to get proof, some universities will simply look at it as him looking for an excuse.

    Rather than trying to find an excuse for his bad grades he should be taking responsibility and doing something about it, or making up for them. As a side note, they're not exceptionally bad and still meet the 5 A* to C requirement.
    yeh that's what i was thinking hence why i cam onto here to talk to people about it , he does have official vet documents that can help him

    isn't law competitive though , should he retake anything
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    (Original post by Juno)
    That's a good start, but he would still need some other documents to prove how it affected him.
    i don't think he has anything else , atleast nothing else ik about :/
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    "Claims should be reserved for serious situations: significant illness, bereavements, being a victim of crime or the sudden significant illness of a close family member." So, while it's sad that he lost his dog and probably did have an impact on his emotions, I'd assume not.
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    (Original post by tcmcm)
    "Claims should be reserved for serious situations: significant illness, bereavements, being a victim of crime or the sudden significant illness of a close family member." So, while it's sad that he lost his dog and probably did have an impact on his emotions, I'd assume not.
    ah that sucks , but then again he treated his dog like part of the family
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    sad that something like a pets death is not treated as seriously as a persons death, pets are very important in our lives as well, don’t see how it’s trivial
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    (Original post by bubblegumcat)
    sad that something like a pets death is not treated as seriously as a persons death, pets are very important in our lives as well, don’t see how it’s trivial
    yeh i agree hence why i came to ask here to see if anything could be done
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    (Original post by Ray_Shadows)
    ah that sucks , but then again he treated his dog like part of the family
    yep most people consider dogs as family unfortunately when it comes to university applications, they are very strict on what they consider as "extenuating". e.g. if your uncle died and you were really close to him, they are unlikely to consider it as they just usually consider bereavement within your immediate family (siblings, parents, grandparent). So unless the death of his dog caused severe emotional distress and was clearly documented during that time (e.g. notes from a counsellor) then it is very unlikely. However, GCSE's aren't everything, he can easily resit those GCSE's if he wants to and work really hard to get amazing grades at A-level. I'm sure there are many law schools that will consider him then, just make sure you look carefully at their entry requirements. Of course he is unlikely to get into very competitive law schools e.g. Oxbridge etc.Research is key.
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    (Original post by NeverGrowUp.)
    yep most people consider dogs as family unfortunately when it comes to university applications, they are very strict on what they consider as "extenuating". e.g. if your uncle died and you were really close to him, they are unlikely to consider it as they just usually consider bereavement within your immediate family (siblings, parents, grandparent). So unless the death of his dog caused severe emotional distress and was clearly documented during that time (e.g. notes from a counsellor) then it is very unlikely. However, GCSE's aren't everything, he can easily resit those GCSE's if he wants to and work really hard to get amazing grades at A-level. I'm sure there are many law schools that will consider him then, just make sure you look carefully at their entry requirements. Of course he is unlikely to get into very competitive law schools e.g. Oxbridge etc.Research is key.
    just to clarify his results were as followed:

    English lit-D
    RE-B
    History-B
    maths-c
    English language-c
    Science-CD
    DT-D
    Geography-U
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    (Original post by Ray_Shadows)
    yeh that's what i was thinking hence why i cam onto here to talk to people about it , he does have official vet documents that can help him

    isn't law competitive though , should he retake anything
    Depends what the Ds and U were in. If they were something like Maths or English I would have expected he resit immediately after finding out he got poor grades. If they were throwaway subjects it's probably not worth it.

    Official Vet Documents are not going to be sufficient to show he was in extenuating circumstances. It really doesn't matter if the dog was part of the family. If your dog dies, you don't call in and say you won't be in work, or have to take days out of classes.

    If he wants to resit then he again, although resitting and getting a C or B in the exams that he got a D or U in now are unlikely to mean much. Getting a B at GCSE level is fine but not nearly as useful if you had to resit and did it a few years later.

    If your friend was genuinely very much affected and this damaged his results (to the extent that he would have been getting say all As and Bs) then he should be able to demonstrate that another way. Waiting a year or two until you apply to uni and then using "my dog died" as an attempt to get extenuating circumstances does not look good.

    Odds are, regardless of the dog's death his grades would not have been vastly different. A U or D in a subject probably wouldn't have been a B or C if everything had been fine. Universities aren't going to care and will merely see it as an excuse. Resits look better than excuses but the grades are still reasonably average. Even if they're all Bs and Cs, that's not going to matter when aiming for really competitive law places.
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    (Original post by Acsel)
    Depends what the Ds and U were in. If they were something like Maths or English I would have expected he resit immediately after finding out he got poor grades. If they were throwaway subjects it's probably not worth it.

    Official Vet Documents are not going to be sufficient to show he was in extenuating circumstances. It really doesn't matter if the dog was part of the family. If your dog dies, you don't call in and say you won't be in work, or have to take days out of classes.

    If he wants to resit then he again, although resitting and getting a C or B in the exams that he got a D or U in now are unlikely to mean much. Getting a B at GCSE level is fine but not nearly as useful if you had to resit and did it a few years later.

    If your friend was genuinely very much affected and this damaged his results (to the extent that he would have been getting say all As and Bs) then he should be able to demonstrate that another way. Waiting a year or two until you apply to uni and then using "my dog died" as an attempt to get extenuating circumstances does not look good.

    Odds are, regardless of the dog's death his grades would not have been vastly different. A U or D in a subject probably wouldn't have been a B or C if everything had been fine. Universities aren't going to care and will merely see it as an excuse. Resits look better than excuses but the grades are still reasonably average. Even if they're all Bs and Cs, that's not going to matter when aiming for really competitive law places.
    i posted his grades above what do u think of it , thanks for the attention to detail , appreciate it
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    (Original post by Ray_Shadows)
    i posted his grades above what do u think of it , thanks for the attention to detail , appreciate it
    Geography is unlikely to affect a degree in law but a U is still a U. He can resit it if he wants but that's still going to show up as a resit, which will still hurt his chances. And even a resit is not guaranteed to get a good grade.

    To put it bluntly, the Cs in Maths and English are more likely to hurt his chances in truly competitive environments. His A Levels are also far more important at this point. If his A Level grades are somewhat similar to the GCSE grades then tbh he wouldn't have much chance of getting into a top uni regardless of what he does.
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    (Original post by Acsel)
    Geography is unlikely to affect a degree in law but a U is still a U. He can resit it if he wants but that's still going to show up as a resit, which will still hurt his chances. And even a resit is not guaranteed to get a good grade.

    To put it bluntly, the Cs in Maths and English are more likely to hurt his chances in truly competitive environments. His A Levels are also far more important at this point. If his A Level grades are somewhat similar to the GCSE grades then tbh he wouldn't have much chance of getting into a top uni regardless of what he does.
    i think i should mention that atm he is doing btec buisness in college + a-level sociology

    he initially wanted to do psychology , sociology, english lit

    but he failed lit (forgot to mention it but i edited it in) so he coudnt do it , they also refused for him to take psychology because everyone in the class had got a B or above and he is simply refusing to retake maths so he coundnt do psychology (they would of let him take it if he retook maths but because of his stubbornness :/) , so he stuck with btec buisness with sociology a-level

    can he still do law with a btec ?
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    (Original post by Ray_Shadows)
    So my friend wants to use this extenuating circumstance to get into law school to make up for his poor gcses.

    his gcses were: BBCCCDDU

    His circumstance: His dog died during his gcses

    Is this a wise thing for him to do , he wants to do law and he said that this will help increase his chances alot , what do you guys think , does this count as extenuating circumstances ?
    While it's sad and all, I think most Unis would see it as a farily weak circumnsatnce where it'd probably do more harm than good mentioning it. If it was a close family member say a Grandad or Uncle or a serious health issue for sure I'd add it but this doesn't really qualify.

    If he was adamant on doing law the only way around it would probably be by doing a foundation year, then if successful he'd be able to continue on the degree course so he's still got a chance though law is extremely competitive...
 
 
 
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