Accommodation or commute? Watch

Anonymous #1
#1
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#1
Busses to the station come every 15 minutes and take 1/2 hour, and then at the station there's a train (that comes every 20 minutes) that's about 30 mins to the town the uni is in, and the actual building is 5 mins walk from the station. The train ticket there and back is just shy of £30 daily, and the bus pass is £100 for 3 months.
The accommodation is not great comparing it to other uni accommodation I've looked at for the same price - the cheapest here is 5 & 1/2 grand for a 42 week contract (including insurance, bills, ect) but it's literally the next building over.
0
reply
Kevin De Bruyne
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#2
Report 2 years ago
#2
(Original post by Anonymous)
Busses to the station come every 15 minutes and take 1/2 hour, and then at the station there's a train (that comes every 20 minutes) that's about 30 mins to the town the uni is in, and the actual building is 5 mins walk from the station. The train ticket there and back is just shy of £30 daily, and the bus pass is £100 for 3 months.
The accommodation is not great comparing it to other uni accommodation I've looked at for the same price - the cheapest here is 5 & 1/2 grand for a 42 week contract (including insurance, bills, ect) but it's literally the next building over.
How busy are the trains?

Do you know how many days and hours a week you will be in? If you have a poorly spread out Week, will you stay at uni all day between lectures?

What would you expect your costs to be while at home?
0
reply
Anonymous #1
#3
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#3
(Original post by Kevin De Bruyne)
How busy are the trains?

Do you know how many days and hours a week you will be in? If you have a poorly spread out Week, will you stay at uni all day between lectures?

What would you expect your costs to be while at home?
Trains can range from half empty to packed, I've only seen them packed on weekends and Friday nights, but I've also only made the journey less than half a dozen times, and I have a friend who made the journey and said it can get busy, but she made the trip at close to 5am there and 9pm back, which is way earlier/later than I'll be doing it.

The schedule will be arranged so I have at least 1 (maybe 2 depending on optional modules) days where I don't have to come in, and they've said that there won't be any days where there's a class in the morning, hours of blank space, and then an afternoon class, so they'll likely be grouped together, but if it did end up like that I could always use the library or wander around town.

The costs of living at home would just be the cost of the ticket, and once I know where I'll be for uni I'll get a part time job in the area, and if I live at home mum'll probably tell me to put it towards my student loans, and she'll pay for bills/food as normal so long as I continue to babysit my brothers (ages 10 & 15) when she works late and pick them up from/drop them off at school on my off day(s).
0
reply
JoshDawg
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#4
Report 2 years ago
#4
(Original post by Anonymous)
Trains can range from half empty to packed, I've only seen them packed on weekends and Friday nights, but I've also only made the journey less than half a dozen times, and I have a friend who made the journey and said it can get busy, but she made the trip at close to 5am there and 9pm back, which is way earlier/later than I'll be doing it.

The schedule will be arranged so I have at least 1 (maybe 2 depending on optional modules) days where I don't have to come in, and they've said that there won't be any days where there's a class in the morning, hours of blank space, and then an afternoon class, so they'll likely be grouped together, but if it did end up like that I could always use the library or wander around town.

The costs of living at home would just be the cost of the ticket, and once I know where I'll be for uni I'll get a part time job in the area, and if I live at home mum'll probably tell me to put it towards my student loans, and she'll pay for bills/food as normal so long as I continue to babysit my brothers (ages 10 & 15) when she works late and pick them up from/drop them off at school on my off day(s).

Personally if I were you I'd opt for home considering it's a pretty sweet deal. Living in accommodation can give you a lot of independence and freedom though, you walk in when you want to walk and cook whatever you want etc. however at home it's all free and far far more comfortable. Better sofa, nicer bed, people you care about around you. If the journey was over 1.5hrs long I would consider living at uni though.

The ticket prices seem pretty steep. Maybe if you buy each ticket as you are on the train so that on days when the ticket man isn't checking you can get a free ride?
0
reply
jelly1000
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#5
Report 2 years ago
#5
(Original post by Anonymous)
Busses to the station come every 15 minutes and take 1/2 hour, and then at the station there's a train (that comes every 20 minutes) that's about 30 mins to the town the uni is in, and the actual building is 5 mins walk from the station. The train ticket there and back is just shy of £30 daily, and the bus pass is £100 for 3 months.
The accommodation is not great comparing it to other uni accommodation I've looked at for the same price - the cheapest here is 5 & 1/2 grand for a 42 week contract (including insurance, bills, ect) but it's literally the next building over.
Depends what kind of lifestyle you want- if you want a quiet lifestyle stay home, if you want the full uni lifestyle with going out and meeting lots of people then move out.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

People at uni: do initiations (like heavy drinking) put you off joining sports societies?

Yes (364)
67.03%
No (179)
32.97%

Watched Threads

View All