04MR17
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#41
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#41
(Original post by Jacob E)
I second all amendments because I do not believe there should be seconders.
Will this be your next amendment? I would be in favour of that
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Saunders16
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#42
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(Original post by mobbsy91)
Do you not think that this effectively condones off site activity as there is let's be honest, not much hope of having sufficient communication through PMs to coordinate a grouping... also, it makes it more effort having to see if a new member is part of a group, if they then want to join a party, but the party don't want dual membership between groups/parties...

All this does is effectively make it easier for parties to be formed, just calling them something different, without a subforum?
It does not express a stance on off-site activity, although it would be somewhat of an inevitability. I do not believe this is a negative thing. There can only be 6/7 parties because it would be wrong to ask the CT for more, but that doesn't mean that they shouldn't exist in some other form. The more different places for people to take part in the MHoC the better; I can only see this additional choice generating extra activity because there would be more to do on the game. As for dual members, I do not see this as an issue: if they are dedicated to a party and merely want a side-project, they will still vote for the party in general elections. It merely allows groupings to get more assistance and could create some interesting alliances and grow inter-party friendships between members.

I would dispute that it makes it necessarily easier for parties to form. The requirements placed on groupings are to ensure that no direct copies are created and that the house can have some sort of confidene in them generating activity. However, as it cannot organise itself effectively on the website, it is inherently limited. What it does do is mean that we can make a more educated decision when people want to form a party, as we can judge its success as a grouping.

(Original post by 04MR17)
3c feels like a contradiction.

"sufficient niche" would need clarifying I think.

It might just be me, but can this amendment please define exactly what it means by grouping?
The purpose of 3c is so that the Speaker can use their judgement to decide if a proposed grouping is too close to a party. There is a consensus that parties themselves need to be sufficiently different to each other, or there might as well just be one (see my point earlier about us only being able to have a certain amount of subforums to use for the MHoC). A direct copy would be inappropriate and used for malicious means, and - in that case - intervention would be appropriate. Groupings, however, could serve as a bridge between two parties that are ideologically similar. I can only see that being to the benefit of the game, as having more different things to do means that people will have more reason to spend time here (for that reason, I think we should adopt more labels, roles and titles for members). I have not clarified the definition of what is a "sufficient niche" because it is best to leave the Speaker to be able to gauge the house's support. I hope the reply to your comment and Mobbsy's help you to clarify what I believe groupings should look like and what purpose they should serve.
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04MR17
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#43
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#43
(Original post by Saunders16)
It does not express a stance on off-site activity, although it would be somewhat of an inevitability. I do not believe this is a negative thing. There can only be 6/7 parties because it would be wrong to ask the CT for more, but that doesn't mean that they shouldn't exist in some other form. The more different places for people to take part in the MHoC the better; I can only see this additional choice generating extra activity because there would be more to do on the game. As for dual members, I do not see this as an issue: if they are dedicated to a party and merely want a side-project, they will still vote for the party in general elections. It merely allows groupings to get more assistance and could create some interesting alliances and grow inter-party friendships between members.

I would dispute that it makes it necessarily easier for parties to form. The requirements placed on groupings are to ensure that no direct copies are created and that the house can have some sort of confidene in them generating activity. However, as it cannot organise itself effectively on the website, it is inherently limited. What it does do is mean that we can make a more educated decision when people want to form a party, as we can judge its success as a grouping.



The purpose of 3c is so that the Speaker can use their judgement to decide if a proposed grouping is too close to a party. There is a consensus that parties themselves need to be sufficiently different to each other, or there might as well just be one (see my point earlier about us only being able to have a certain amount of subforums to use for the MHoC). A direct copy would be inappropriate and used for malicious means, and - in that case - intervention would be appropriate. Groupings, however, could serve as a bridge between two parties that are ideologically similar. I can only see that being to the benefit of the game, as having more different things to do means that people will have more reason to spend time here (for that reason, I think we should adopt more labels, roles and titles for members). I have not clarified the definition of what is a "sufficient niche" because it is best to leave the Speaker to be able to gauge the house's support. I hope the reply to your comment and Mobbsy's help you to clarify what I believe groupings should look like and what purpose they should serve.
I understand the purpose of 3c, but I think new grouping's "aiming to differentiate" but "do not need to be significantly different" feels like a contradiction of terms. I'd suggest tweaking the wording accordingly.

I understand your comment and agree with the principle of groupings, my point was about the legislation itself. It remains unclear in the amendment what a grouping actually is, in all its exactness. I do not wish this thread to replace thread discussions on amendments, the purpose of this thread is to find seconders and (as you pointed out) have constructive comments on the formatting, which is what I have done.

If "sufficient niche" is to be determined by the speaker, state that in the amendment.
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Saunders16
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#44
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#44
(Original post by 04MR17)
I understand the purpose of 3c, but I think new grouping's "aiming to differentiate" but "do not need to be significantly different" feels like a contradiction of terms. I'd suggest tweaking the wording accordingly.

I understand your comment and agree with the principle of groupings, my point was about the legislation itself. It remains unclear in the amendment what a grouping actually is, in all its exactness. I do not wish this thread to replace thread discussions on amendments, the purpose of this thread is to find seconders and (as you pointed out) have constructive comments on the formatting, which is what I have done.

If "sufficient niche" is to be determined by the speaker, state that in the amendment.
I appreciate the feedback and I'll have a look at changing the wording. If I do so, will you second the amendment? Otherwise, let's leave the debating to the actual thread
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Joep95
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#45
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#45
(Original post by mobbsy91)
Do you not think that this effectively condones off site activity as there is let's be honest, not much hope of having sufficient communication through PMs to coordinate a grouping... also, it makes it more effort having to see if a new member is part of a group, if they then want to join a party, but the party don't want dual membership between groups/parties...

All this does is effectively make it easier for parties to be formed, just calling them something different, without a subforum?
You could coordinate a grouping through PMs, that’s what the libers did while waiting for the speakers approval
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Tanqueray91
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#46
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(Original post by joecphillips)
You could coordinate a grouping through PMs, that’s what the libers did while waiting for the speakers approval
That's not exactly what happened though is it...
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Joep95
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#47
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#47
(Original post by mobbsy91)
That's not exactly what happened though is it...
It is after we were approved we used other methods
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Tanqueray91
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#48
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(Original post by joecphillips)
It is after we were approved we used other methods
Ok, so in that case, my original point still stands... until formation, it was fine to use onsite and the relevant thread for communications (as well as no doubt other means in any case), but then after the formation extra means were needed, and so the reasoning still stands that if a group is 'formed' officially, that it'd be unreasonable to expect they could fully perform just through PMs
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Saunders16
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#49
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(Original post by mobbsy91)
Ok, so in that case, my original point still stands... until formation, it was fine to use onsite and the relevant thread for communications (as well as no doubt other means in any case), but then after the formation extra means were needed, and so the reasoning still stands that if a group is 'formed' officially, that it'd be unreasonable to expect they could fully perform just through PMs
I do not see how off-site communications are an issue; TSR is an extremely limited platform and it is very difficult to run the MHoC the way that many people would like to. Just as independent MPs or people who are not members of any party can communicate through whatever means they like, it would not be a bad thing for groupings to do the same. It would be an issue if that meant activity was taken away from the MHoC, but - to the contrary - groupings would increase activity by giving greater choice to members and creating new alliances.
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04MR17
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#50
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(Original post by Saunders16)
I appreciate the feedback and I'll have a look at changing the wording. If I do so, will you second the amendment? Otherwise, let's leave the debating to the actual thread
Not an MP.
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Joep95
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#51
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(Original post by mobbsy91)
Ok, so in that case, my original point still stands... until formation, it was fine to use onsite and the relevant thread for communications (as well as no doubt other means in any case), but then after the formation extra means were needed, and so the reasoning still stands that if a group is 'formed' officially, that it'd be unreasonable to expect they could fully perform just through PMs
They weren’t needed we could have continued to use pms
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Tanqueray91
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#52
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(Original post by joecphillips)
They weren’t needed we could have continued to use pms
I highly doubt that, as other off site communications were used as well, not just PMs...
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Rakas21
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#53
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What Mobbsy said.

There is nothing stopping independents working together now or even independents creating manifestos with a prospective party in them (as i said in the by-election thread, this was a missed opportunity for Nige and co), the only thing party status gives them is a sub-forum and an official name on the ballot list.

I remain heavily opposed, 12.2 is also a dullution of the speakers power, something i will fight hard to oppose on almost all occasions (speakers need more power, not less).
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Mr T 999
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#54
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#54
(Original post by Saunders16)
I haven't actually written an amendment before, so please tell me if there is anything I need to change. I also need seconders so please either PM or reply to this message if you are happy to second it.

Axxx - Independent Groupings Amendment, The Hon. Saunders16 MP (Libertarian)
In the Guidance Document insert a new section entitled Independent Grouping Formation:

(1) Users proposing a new grouping should create a thread in the Model House of Commons forum setting out the grouping’s main principles.
(2) Interested users may declare their intention to join the new grouping by posting on the proposal thread or sending a private message to the proposers or Speaker.
(3) When deciding whether to allow a grouping to form, the Speaker should consider;
a. Electoral support for the party on TSR in the form of dual members.
b. The grouping should have two active members in the MHoC, or five eligible voters.
c. New groupings should aim to differentiate themselves from existing parties and groupings, but - unlike parties - do not need to be significantly different to parties and groupings that already exist.

In the Guidance Document insert into the section entitled Party Formation:

(4) If a grouping is deemed to meet the requirements to become a party and there are less than six parties at that point, the Speaker should approve its formation as a party if requested.
(5) If a grouping is deemed to meet the requirements to become a party but there are six parties or more at that point, the Speaker should approve its formation if there is judged to be a sufficient niche. If there is not a sufficient niche, but there is a party that does not meet the requirements at that point, the party should be given one month by the Speaker to meet the requirements and be replaced if it fails to do so.
(6) If a party is replaced under subsection (5), the Speaker should hold an internal vote between the party closing down altogether or becoming a grouping instead. After a vote is held, a week should be given until the subforum is transferred.

In the Constitution insert into the section entitled Party Membership:

12.2 Members are allowed to be in a grouping at the same time they hold party membership without needing the permission of party/grouping leaders or the Speaker.
I don't agree with the duel members as a requirement for groupings to be formed. The problem with relying on duel members is, if the duel member is active in the grouping where they generate most of the activity, if they were to leave activity could drop. Also some parties don't accept duel members, so you can't force parties to accept duel members in clause 12.2. I suggest you remove duel members from the amendment. As already mentioned clause 3 c is a contradiction change the wording.
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Saracen's Fez
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#55
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#55
This is a very sizeable amendment and will require notes if submitted, but it removes the current system of government formation with what I consider to be a less arbitrary and more democratic system of Prime Ministerial elections:

Prime Ministerial Elections Amendment
Proposed by: Saracen’s Fez MP (Labour)
Seconded by:

This House would amend the Constitution as follows:

Remove from Section 6 ‘The Government’:

6.1. is formed by the party or coalition with the most seats. In the event of a tie in the number of seats, which party or coalition forms the Government shall be decided by, in order (moving to the next one if tied), the highest number of votes in the preceding election, the lowest number of parties in the coalition, the highest number of seats in a single party in a coalition, and the highest number of votes in a single party in a coalition. If these are all equal, there is no government.

6.2. shall form as per by the Guiding Document.


and replace it with:

6.1. shall be led by a Prime Minister elected as per the Guiding Document.

6.2. is formed by the party/parties and independent MPs who support the elected Prime Minister. Parties and independent MPs may choose to leave and enter the government during the course of a term, but unless a withdrawal would result in the Prime Minister themselves being outside government, the Prime Minister remains in place.


Remove the following from Section 10 ‘Motions of No Confidence’:

10.1. can be called in:
10.1.1. The Speaker
10.1.2. The Deputy Speaker(s)
10.1.3. The Government
10.1.4. Party Leaders

10.2. remove the subject in question and except in the case of a vote of a government losing a motion of no confidence, shall lead to a new election. In the case of a new Speakership election following a motion of no confidence, it is run by a Deputy Speaker who is not running, or failing that a supermoderator or administrator.

10.3 when successfully called in the government will disband the current government and allow parties 7 days to propose a coalition government. If the VoNC was called in a coalition government, that same coalition government may not reform for the rest of that term.

10.4 A motion of no confidence can be called in The Speaker, The Deputy Speaker(s) or The Government at any time, unless:—
10.4.1 less than two weeks have passed since the previous Motion of No Confidence in that position ended; or
10.4.2 the position has been filled for a period of less than two weeks;

10.5. Can be submitted by:—
10.5.1. an MP when seconded by 4 other MPs, at least one of whom must be from a different party, who must all be named on the motion;
10.5.2. the requirement for the motion to be seconded by a member of another party shall be waived if there is only a single party not part of the government;

10.6 the form of motions shall be:—
10.6.1 in the government, "That this House has no confidence in Her Majesty's Government.";
10.6.2 in the Speaker, "That this House has no confidence in The Speaker.";
10.6.3 in the Deputy Speaker(s), "That this House has no confidence in the Deputy Speaker(s).";
10.6.4 the statement may be followed by an explanation of the reasons so as to act as an opening statement;

10.7 When a valid Motion of No Confidence in the Government, the Speaker, or the Deputy Speaker(s) is submitted to the Speaker, the Speaker shall begin the process of the motion as part of the first TSR Model House of Commons Update after the submission of the motion.


and replace it with:

10.1. can be called in:
10.1.1. The Speaker
10.1.2. The Deputy Speaker(s)
10.1.3. The Prime Minister
10.1.4. Party Leaders

10.2. if successful, remove the subject in question and lead to a new election to that position. In the case of a new Speakership election following a motion of no confidence, it is run by a Deputy Speaker who is not running, or failing that a Support Team member or administrator.

10.3. when successfully called in the Prime Minister will trigger a new election to the role, carried out as per the Guiding Document.

10.4. A motion of no confidence can be called in The Speaker, The Deputy Speaker(s) or The Prime Minister at any time, unless:—
10.4.1 less than two weeks have passed since the previous Motion of No Confidence in that position ended; or
10.4.2 the position has been filled for a period of less than two weeks;

10.5. May be submitted by:—
10.5.1. an MP when seconded by 4 other MPs, at least one of whom must be from a different party, who must all be named on the motion;
10.5.2. the requirement for the motion to be seconded by a member of another party shall be waived if there is only a single party not part of the government;

10.6. the form of motions shall be:—
10.6.1. in the Prime Minister, "This House has no confidence in the Prime Minister."
10.6.2. in the Speaker, "This House has no confidence in the Speaker."
10.6.3. in the Deputy Speaker(s), "This House has no confidence in the Deputy Speaker(s)."
10.6.4. The statement may be followed by an explanation of the reasons so as to act as an opening statement.

10.7. When a valid Motion of No Confidence in the Prime Minister, the Speaker, or the Deputy Speaker(s) is submitted to the Speaker, the Speaker shall begin the process of the motion as part of the first TSR Model House of Commons Update after the submission of the motion.


Furthermore, this House would amend the Guidance Document as follows:

Remove from the section entitled ‘Government’:

1) The Speaker shall ask the party or coalition that fulfils the criteria in article 6.1 of the Constitution to form the Government.

4) Unless the Government appoints a specific minister to take on this responsibility, the minister responsible for the Foreign and Commonwealth Office is responsible for liaising with the Model European Union, and shall represent the Model House of Commons within the Model European Union.

5) If the Prime Minister initially elected following a general election resigns or is removed, and there is any contention within the Government as to the appointment of a permanent replacement, the Speaker shall hold a poll of Government MPs to resolve this. If the Government has not submitted in advance a system by which a temporary replacement will be appointed, the Speaker will make a decision in case of contention as to who an Acting Prime Minister will be.


And insert, adjusting numbering accordingly (i.e. point 7 would follow immediately after the existing point 6):

1) The government consists of the party of the Prime Minister, plus any other parties or independent MPs who announce their support for the Prime Minister.

4) If the Prime Minister is temporarily unavailable, and there is any contention within the Government as to the appointment of a temporary replacement, the Speaker will make a decision as to who an Acting Prime Minister will be.

7) Users who are neither members of parties in government nor independent MPs in government are prohibited from holding ministerial office.

8) Parties and independent MPs may choose to enter or leave government at any point. This does not change the identity of the government, though if the party of the Prime Minister wishes to leave government, the Prime Minister must first resign and a replacement must be elected.


Remove the section entitled ‘Coalition Breakup’:

1) If a Party withdraws from Government Coalition leaving the Government without an absolute majority, the Government disbands.

2) Following the dissolution of a Government Coalition the Speaker shall post a Notice informing the House of such a dissolution, and

3) Parties shall have 7 days to form alternative coalitions, except

4) That barring an intervening General Election, the dissolved coalition government is ineligible to form the next Government,

5) After the 7 day period has passed, the Speaker shall ask the Party Leader(s) of the Party or Coalition that satisfy article 6.1 of the Constitution to form a Government, and

6) They shall ask the Party Leader(s) of the Party or Coalition that satisfy article 7.1 of the Constitution to form the Official Opposition.

7) A General Election shall be called, using the applicable procedures, if
a) A Government that satisfies article 6.1 of the Constitution cannot be formed, or
b) This is the second Government collapse of the parliamentary term.


Remove the subsection entitled ‘Motions of No Confidence against the Government’:

1) A Motion of no confidence can be called against the Government at any point during a term of governance unless the government was formed less than two weeks prior to the motion, or less than two weeks have passed since the last motion of no confidence was called against the government. The person calling the vote must be an MP of any party.

2) The Speaker must be notified by one person and get at least 4 other MPs to second the motion, at least one of whom must be from another party unless only a single party is not part of the government.

3) This will automatically start a 3 day discussion where both sides get to argue their points; the Speaker will start a thread and post the reasons for the motion of no confidence being called.

4) After the 3 day discussion a 4 day poll will be opened in the Division Lobby so that all MPs can have a vote. The poll will be a private poll only showing the results when it has ended.

5) If the result of the poll is in favour of the motion of no confidence then a period of 7 days shall be allowed for other parties to form a new government (using all the usual regulations for it).

6) If the result of the poll does not favour the motion of no confidence then usual business will resume in the House of Commons.


and replace it with a subsection entitled ‘Motions of No Confidence against the Prime Minister':

1) A motion of no confidence can be called against the Prime Minister at any point during a term of governance unless the Prime Minister took office less than two weeks prior to the motion, or less than two weeks have passed since the last motion of no confidence was called against the Prime Minister. The person calling the vote must be an MP of any party.

2) The Speaker must be notified by one person and get at least 4 other MPs to second the motion, at least one of whom must be from another party unless only a single party is not part of the government.

3) This will automatically start a 3 day discussion where both sides get to argue their points; the Speaker will start a thread and post the reasons for the motion of no confidence being called.

4) After the 3 day discussion a 4 day poll will be opened in the Division Lobby so that all MPs can have a vote. The poll will be a private poll only showing the results when it has ended.

5) If the result of the poll is in favour of the motion of no confidence then a new election for the role of Prime Minister will begin. The outgoing Prime Minister will remain in office until the completion of this election.

6) If the result of the poll does not favour the motion of no confidence then usual business will resume in the House of Commons.


Insert a new section after ‘Deputy Speaker Elections’, entitled ‘Prime Ministerial Elections’:

1) At the start of each parliamentary term, and following the resignation or a vote of no confidence of a Prime Minister, a Prime Ministerial election will take place.

2) This election will be overseen by the Speaker.

3) An initial period of 7 days will be allowed for submission of candidacies. A candidacy will list the individual wishing to become Prime Minister and the parties and independent MPs supporting them.

4) Party leaders have the final say as to whom their party will support. Independent MPs may decide for themselves whom to support.

5) Parties and independent MPs may only support one candidate.

6) Following the submission of candidacies, a 4-day poll will begin in the Division Lobby, in which all candidates plus ‘Abstain’ are options. All polling in a Prime Ministerial election is public and visible.

7) If no candidate achieves over 50% of the non-abstention votes, the lowest-placed candidate is removed. Other candidates are eliminated if the sum of their vote total and the vote totals of candidates already eliminated in that round is still lower than that of the next-best-placed candidate. A second round of voting amongst all non-eliminated candidates then takes place, lasting for 3 days.

8) Step 7 is repeated until one candidate receives over 50% of the non-abstention vote.

9) A candidate receiving over 50% of the non-abstention vote is elected Prime Minister.

10) In the event of a tie for first place, and if no candidates not tied are left, the candidate with the most votes in the previous round is deemed the victor. If this does not resolve the tie, the post of Prime Minister is left vacant, and a new election begins in 28 days.

11) The Prime Minister may resign and trigger a new election at any point, but will remain in office, where possible, until a replacement is elected. If this is not possible, an Acting Prime Minister will be appointed in the usual fashion.

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username1450924
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#56
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#56
(Original post by Saracen's Fez)
This is a very sizeable amendment and will require notes if submitted, but it removes the current system of government formation with what I consider to be a less arbitrary and more democratic system of Prime Ministerial elections:

Prime Ministerial Elections Amendment
Proposed by: Saracen’s Fez MP (Labour)
Seconded by:

This House would amend the Constitution as follows:

Remove from Section 6 ‘The Government’:

6.1. is formed by the party or coalition with the most seats. In the event of a tie in the number of seats, which party or coalition forms the Government shall be decided by, in order (moving to the next one if tied), the highest number of votes in the preceding election, the lowest number of parties in the coalition, the highest number of seats in a single party in a coalition, and the highest number of votes in a single party in a coalition. If these are all equal, there is no government.

6.2. shall form as per by the Guiding Document.

and replace it with:

6.1. shall be led by a Prime Minister elected as per the Guiding Document.

6.2. is formed by the party/parties and independent MPs who support the elected Prime Minister. Parties and independent MPs may choose to leave and enter the government during the course of a term, but unless a withdrawal would result in the Prime Minister themselves being outside government, the Prime Minister remains in place.

Remove the following from Section 10 ‘Motions of No Confidence’:

10.1. can be called in:
10.1.1. The Speaker
10.1.2. The Deputy Speaker(s)
10.1.3. The Government
10.1.4. Party Leaders

10.2. remove the subject in question and except in the case of a vote of a government losing a motion of no confidence, shall lead to a new election. In the case of a new Speakership election following a motion of no confidence, it is run by a Deputy Speaker who is not running, or failing that a supermoderator or administrator.

10.3 when successfully called in the government will disband the current government and allow parties 7 days to propose a coalition government. If the VoNC was called in a coalition government, that same coalition government may not reform for the rest of that term.

10.4 A motion of no confidence can be called in The Speaker, The Deputy Speaker(s) or The Government at any time, unless:—
10.4.1 less than two weeks have passed since the previous Motion of No Confidence in that position ended; or
10.4.2 the position has been filled for a period of less than two weeks;

10.5. Can be submitted by:—
10.5.1. an MP when seconded by 4 other MPs, at least one of whom must be from a different party, who must all be named on the motion;
10.5.2. the requirement for the motion to be seconded by a member of another party shall be waived if there is only a single party not part of the government;

10.6 the form of motions shall be:—
10.6.1 in the government, "That this House has no confidence in Her Majesty's Government.";
10.6.2 in the Speaker, "That this House has no confidence in The Speaker.";
10.6.3 in the Deputy Speaker(s), "That this House has no confidence in the Deputy Speaker(s).";
10.6.4 the statement may be followed by an explanation of the reasons so as to act as an opening statement;

10.7 When a valid Motion of No Confidence in the Government, the Speaker, or the Deputy Speaker(s) is submitted to the Speaker, the Speaker shall begin the process of the motion as part of the first TSR Model House of Commons Update after the submission of the motion.

and replace it with:

10.1. can be called in:
10.1.1. The Speaker
10.1.2. The Deputy Speaker(s)
10.1.3. The Prime Minister
10.1.4. Party Leaders

10.2. if successful, remove the subject in question and lead to a new election to that position. In the case of a new Speakership election following a motion of no confidence, it is run by a Deputy Speaker who is not running, or failing that a Support Team member or administrator.

10.3. when successfully called in the Prime Minister will trigger a new election to the role, carried out as per the Guiding Document.

10.4. A motion of no confidence can be called in The Speaker, The Deputy Speaker(s) or The Prime Minister at any time, unless:—
10.4.1 less than two weeks have passed since the previous Motion of No Confidence in that position ended; or
10.4.2 the position has been filled for a period of less than two weeks;

10.5. May be submitted by:—
10.5.1. an MP when seconded by 4 other MPs, at least one of whom must be from a different party, who must all be named on the motion;
10.5.2. the requirement for the motion to be seconded by a member of another party shall be waived if there is only a single party not part of the government;

10.6. the form of motions shall be:—
10.6.1. in the Prime Minister, "This House has no confidence in the Prime Minister."
10.6.2. in the Speaker, "This House has no confidence in the Speaker."
10.6.3. in the Deputy Speaker(s), "This House has no confidence in the Deputy Speaker(s)."
10.6.4. The statement may be followed by an explanation of the reasons so as to act as an opening statement.

10.7. When a valid Motion of No Confidence in the Prime Minister, the Speaker, or the Deputy Speaker(s) is submitted to the Speaker, the Speaker shall begin the process of the motion as part of the first TSR Model House of Commons Update after the submission of the motion.

Furthermore, this House would amend the Guidance Document as follows:

Remove from the section entitled ‘Government’:

1) The Speaker shall ask the party or coalition that fulfils the criteria in article 6.1 of the Constitution to form the Government.

4) Unless the Government appoints a specific minister to take on this responsibility, the minister responsible for the Foreign and Commonwealth Office is responsible for liaising with the Model European Union, and shall represent the Model House of Commons within the Model European Union.

5) If the Prime Minister initially elected following a general election resigns or is removed, and there is any contention within the Government as to the appointment of a permanent replacement, the Speaker shall hold a poll of Government MPs to resolve this. If the Government has not submitted in advance a system by which a temporary replacement will be appointed, the Speaker will make a decision in case of contention as to who an Acting Prime Minister will be.

And insert, adjusting numbering accordingly (i.e. point 7 would follow immediately after the existing point 6):

1) The government consists of the party of the Prime Minister, plus any other parties or independent MPs who announce their support for the Prime Minister.

4) If the Prime Minister is temporarily unavailable, and there is any contention within the Government as to the appointment of a temporary replacement, the Speaker will make a decision as to who an Acting Prime Minister will be.

7) Users who are neither members of parties in government nor independent MPs in government are prohibited from holding ministerial office.

8) Parties and independent MPs may choose to enter or leave government at any point. This does not change the identity of the government, though if the party of the Prime Minister wishes to leave government, the Prime Minister must first resign and a replacement must be elected.

Remove the section entitled ‘Coalition Breakup’:

1) If a Party withdraws from Government Coalition leaving the Government without an absolute majority, the Government disbands.

2) Following the dissolution of a Government Coalition the Speaker shall post a Notice informing the House of such a dissolution, and

3) Parties shall have 7 days to form alternative coalitions, except

4) That barring an intervening General Election, the dissolved coalition government is ineligible to form the next Government,

5) After the 7 day period has passed, the Speaker shall ask the Party Leader(s) of the Party or Coalition that satisfy article 6.1 of the Constitution to form a Government, and

6) They shall ask the Party Leader(s) of the Party or Coalition that satisfy article 7.1 of the Constitution to form the Official Opposition.

7) A General Election shall be called, using the applicable procedures, if
a) A Government that satisfies article 6.1 of the Constitution cannot be formed, or
b) This is the second Government collapse of the parliamentary term.

Remove the subsection entitled ‘Motions of No Confidence against the Government’:

1) A Motion of no confidence can be called against the Government at any point during a term of governance unless the government was formed less than two weeks prior to the motion, or less than two weeks have passed since the last motion of no confidence was called against the government. The person calling the vote must be an MP of any party.

2) The Speaker must be notified by one person and get at least 4 other MPs to second the motion, at least one of whom must be from another party unless only a single party is not part of the government.

3) This will automatically start a 3 day discussion where both sides get to argue their points; the Speaker will start a thread and post the reasons for the motion of no confidence being called.

4) After the 3 day discussion a 4 day poll will be opened in the Division Lobby so that all MPs can have a vote. The poll will be a private poll only showing the results when it has ended.

5) If the result of the poll is in favour of the motion of no confidence then a period of 7 days shall be allowed for other parties to form a new government (using all the usual regulations for it).

6) If the result of the poll does not favour the motion of no confidence then usual business will resume in the House of Commons.

and replace it with a subsection entitled ‘Motions of No Confidence against the Prime Minister':

1) A motion of no confidence can be called against the Prime Minister at any point during a term of governance unless the Prime Minister took office less than two weeks prior to the motion, or less than two weeks have passed since the last motion of no confidence was called against the Prime Minister. The person calling the vote must be an MP of any party.

2) The Speaker must be notified by one person and get at least 4 other MPs to second the motion, at least one of whom must be from another party unless only a single party is not part of the government.

3) This will automatically start a 3 day discussion where both sides get to argue their points; the Speaker will start a thread and post the reasons for the motion of no confidence being called.

4) After the 3 day discussion a 4 day poll will be opened in the Division Lobby so that all MPs can have a vote. The poll will be a private poll only showing the results when it has ended.

5) If the result of the poll is in favour of the motion of no confidence then a new election for the role of Prime Minister will begin. The outgoing Prime Minister will remain in office until the completion of this election.

6) If the result of the poll does not favour the motion of no confidence then usual business will resume in the House of Commons.

Insert a new section after ‘Deputy Speaker Elections’, entitled ‘Prime Ministerial Elections’:

1) At the start of each parliamentary term, and following the resignation or a vote of no confidence of a Prime Minister, a Prime Ministerial election will take place.

2) This election will be overseen by the Speaker.

3) An initial period of 7 days will be allowed for submission of candidacies. A candidacy will list the individual wishing to become Prime Minister and the parties and independent MPs supporting them.

4) Party leaders have the final say as to whom their party will support. Independent MPs may decide for themselves whom to support.

5) Parties and independent MPs may only support one candidate.

6) Following the submission of candidacies, a 4-day poll will begin in the Division Lobby, in which all candidates plus ‘Abstain’ are options. All polling in a Prime Ministerial election is public and visible.

7) If no candidate achieves over 50% of the non-abstention votes, the lowest-placed candidate is removed. Other candidates are eliminated if the sum of their vote total and the vote totals of candidates already eliminated in that round is still lower than that of the next-best-placed candidate. A second round of voting amongst all non-eliminated candidates then takes place, lasting for 3 days.

8) Step 7 is repeated until one candidate receives over 50% of the non-abstention vote.

9) A candidate receiving over 50% of the non-abstention vote is elected Prime Minister.

10) In the event of a tie for first place, and if no candidates not tied are left, the candidate with the most votes in the previous round is deemed the victor. If this does not resolve the tie, the post of Prime Minister is left vacant, and a new election begins in 28 days.

11) The Prime Minister may resign and trigger a new election at any point, but will remain in office, where possible, until a replacement is elected. If this is not possible, an Acting Prime Minister will be appointed in the usual fashion.
This is an interesting suggestion. I will happily second to get it to the floor, however I am not sure if I would be willing to vote for it until I see the debate unfold. Would be currently minded to vote for it though.
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username1450924
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"1) The government consists of the party of the Prime Minister, plus any other parties or independent MPs who announce their support for the Prime Minister."

Wording would need to be cleared up. For example a party may tactically support a right wing government to prevent a left wing prime minister, however it would not necessarily mean they want to be a party of Government.

"4) Party leaders have the final say as to whom their party will support. Independent MPs may decide for themselves whom to support.

5) Parties and independent MPs may only support one candidate."

I do not think MPs of parties should be forced to vote with how their leader votes if this bill goes ahead. Would be interesting to see an MP defy their party and support another candidate.
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Saracen's Fez
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(Original post by Tommy1boy)
"1) The government consists of the party of the Prime Minister, plus any other parties or independent MPs who announce their support for the Prime Minister."

Wording would need to be cleared up. For example a party may tactically support a right wing government to prevent a left wing prime minister, however it would not necessarily mean they want to be a party of Government.

"4) Party leaders have the final say as to whom their party will support. Independent MPs may decide for themselves whom to support.

5) Parties and independent MPs may only support one candidate."

I do not think MPs of parties should be forced to vote with how their leader votes if this bill goes ahead. Would be interesting to see an MP defy their party and support another candidate.
I agree there are a couple of things that could be cleared up. The principle is that parties would be able to leave government, or enter government (probably with the permission of all parties currently in government) without changing the identity of the PM or it being treated as a government collapse like at present.

As regards voting, whilst party leaders would have full control over whether their party were in or out of a particular PM's government, the MPs would have to cast their own individual votes in the election (though it is envisaged that there would be whipping, hence the public poll).
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Tanqueray91
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(Original post by Tommy1boy)
"1) The government consists of the party of the Prime Minister, plus any other parties or independent MPs who announce their support for the Prime Minister."

Wording would need to be cleared up. For example a party may tactically support a right wing government to prevent a left wing prime minister, however it would not necessarily mean they want to be a party of Government.

"4) Party leaders have the final say as to whom their party will support. Independent MPs may decide for themselves whom to support.

5) Parties and independent MPs may only support one candidate."

I do not think MPs of parties should be forced to vote with how their leader votes if this bill goes ahead. Would be interesting to see an MP defy their party and support another candidate.
tl;dr?
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Tanqueray91
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**** wrong person PetrosAC?
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