Are selfish people happier? Watch

This discussion is closed.
eleenia
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 14 years ago
#1
I was reading a book that argues that selfish and greedy people have the easiest lives and probably the happiest. What do you think?
1
spk
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#2
Report 14 years ago
#2
Possibly easy but not necessarily happy. Selfish, greedy people aren't likely to make many genuine friendships.
0
eleenia
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 14 years ago
#3
(Original post by spk)
Possibly easy but not necessarily happy. Selfish, greedy people aren't likely to make many genuine friendships.
Do you think? I think selfish people flock together and as their so self-obsessed they have no desire for genuine friendship anyway, so it's unlikely to affect their level of happiness. Their level of happiness might be gaged in terms of getting all the stuff they want.
1
katiesado
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#4
Report 14 years ago
#4
It's a medical fact that pessimistic people die earlier than optimistic people. Selfish people I'd generally say are probably pessimistic about life with a take-what-you-can-from-who-you-can mindset. Maybe it's a happier life (which I doubt) but its a shorter one!
0
Amb1
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#5
Report 14 years ago
#5
Probably true until they need some personal support. I think that if you never give anything you can't expect anything back. What's the point if you've got everything you want but no-one to share it with?
0
spk
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#6
Report 14 years ago
#6
They're also likely to see the price of everything but the value of nothing.
0
eleenia
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 14 years ago
#7
(Original post by Amb1)
Probably true until they need some personal support. I think that if you never give anything you can't expect anything back. What's the point if you've got everything you want but no-one to share it with?
Some people I've met are quite selective with their selfishness though... They might have a close relationship, say with their boyfriend/girlfriend but they see everyone else as fair game to bleed dry and get as much as they can out of them... what's more they're fully aware that if they don't give anything they won't get anything back, which is why they are constantly forging new acquaintances to use in the same way.
Yet, the people I've met like this ... and I can think of a few, never seem to be unhappy or particularly come acropper for being so selfish. There's no justice!
As far as pessimism goes though, i'm heading for that early grave...
0
Minor_Deity
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#8
Report 14 years ago
#8
Emotions are contageous, when we see someone happier or laughing we smile and laugh, when you walk into a room with a solem (sp?) atmosphere we become solem ourselves. I can only see then that people who give and make people happier will see more happiness, thus becoming happier themselves, while people who take and make people feel bad will have less interaction with ahppy people and feel sader as a result.
0
RieLouise
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#9
Report 14 years ago
#9
(Original post by eleenia)
I was reading a book that argues that selfish and greedy people have the easiest lives and probably the happiest. What do you think?
Um...not according to Plato.

Could we have the title and author of this book please?

T.I.A.
0
ace_justncase
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#10
Report 14 years ago
#10
(Original post by Amb1)
Probably true until they need some personal support. I think that if you never give anything you can't expect anything back. What's the point if you've got everything you want but no-one to share it with?
To true, how can someone that only care about themselves find care and help with anyone else. It a rule of life, they will be treated like how they treat others.
0
eleenia
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#11
Report Thread starter 14 years ago
#11
(Original post by bratcat)
Um...not according to Plato.

Could we have the title and author of this book please?

T.I.A.
OK the book is a fictional book called Voyage to the End of the Room by Tibor Fischer. OK it's not Plato - but it does pose a lot of questions about humankind and humankindness in this day and age.

I guess the kind of person it's describing is the someone who's superfically friendly, (a networker), out to make advantageous/fairweather friendships which are geared towards selfish self-advancement. This person, the book observes, isn't particularly unhappy with their lot.
Rather, it is people who expect more from their friendships and relationships with others that are unhappy, because they are essentially dissapointed by other people - especially, when they turn out to be largely superficial and selfish.
Why what did Plato say?

The book makes out that people who take the 'selfish people will only end up unhappy' line, are essentially buying into a myth that is unrealistic in today's society. In a way, I kind of see it.
0
Shushi
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#12
Report 14 years ago
#12
They might be happy but what goes around comes around.
0
material breach
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#13
Report 14 years ago
#13
define happiness first

If you consider people to be happy when they are doing things that they believe are right or enjoyable, both right and happiness are pretty subjective notions. Hence the selfish might consider themselves happy however to others who have base their happiness on ethics, they would not be happpy.
1
eleenia
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#14
Report Thread starter 14 years ago
#14
(Original post by Incomplete)
define happiness first

If you consider people to be happy when they are doing things that they believe are right or enjoyable, both right and happiness are pretty subjective notions. Hence the selfish might consider themselves happy however to others who have base their happiness on ethics, they would not be happpy.
true, maybe carefree's more the right term. I don't know it's just something that I thought about...

Mods, you can delete this now!
0
LinLee
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#15
Report 14 years ago
#15
I think it's a matter of maturity. Young people are more likely to be selfish and reckless as they cannot see the effects of their actions, and therefore are happy..but only for the time being. as they get older they antics become frivolous and they begin to realise what really matters, maybe by seein in others what they are missin out on...like loyalty and trust...virtues that money cant buy. Just think of the old grumpy selfish people...you cant honestly think that they're happy?
1
Muse
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#16
Report 14 years ago
#16
human altruism doesn't exist, therefore argument void :cool:
0
eleenia
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#17
Report Thread starter 14 years ago
#17
(Original post by timeofyourlife)
human altruism doesn't exist, therefore argument void :cool:
Do you reckon? Do we not learn to be alturistic? Please explain...
0
RieLouise
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#18
Report 14 years ago
#18
(Original post by eleenia)
OK the book is a fictional book called Voyage to the End of the Room by Tibor Fischer. OK it's not Plato - but it does pose a lot of questions about humankind and humankindness in this day and age.

I guess the kind of person it's describing is the someone who's superfically friendly, (a networker), out to make advantageous/fairweather friendships which are geared towards selfish self-advancement. This person, the book observes, isn't particularly unhappy with their lot.
Rather, it is people who expect more from their friendships and relationships with others that are unhappy, because they are essentially dissapointed by other people - especially, when they turn out to be largely superficial and selfish.
Why what did Plato say?
Oh, 1,700 pages worth of the stuff and loads more besides.
Basically, that the individual existed as part of a whole - a society - and to maintain order in that 'Rupublic' evryone must contribute as much as they were capable of because, ultimately, it would benefit them too, in the long term. Not a perfect explanation. (Picks up Loudspeaker) Emergency, emergency...Philosophers needed here!

You remember our very own Donne....'Any man's death diminishes me. For no man is an island. I am a part of the continent. A part of the whole. So, therefore, do ask for whom the bell tolls. It tolls for thee.' ... might use that as my sig file

The book makes out that people who take the 'selfish people will only end up unhappy' line, are essentially buying into a myth that is unrealistic in today's society. In a way, I kind of see it.
Come up with some tasty quotes later. What flavour would you like?
0
eleenia
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#19
Report Thread starter 14 years ago
#19
(Original post by bratcat)
Oh, 1,700 pages worth of the stuff and loads more besides.
Basically, that the individual existed as part of a whole - a society - and to maintain order in that 'Rupublic' evryone must contribute as much as they were capable of because, ultimately, it would benefit them too, in the long term. Not a perfect explanation. (Picks up Loudspeaker) Emergency, emergency...Philosophers needed here!

You remember our very own Donne....'Any man's death diminishes me. For no man is an island. I am a part of the continent. A part of the whole. So, therefore, do ask for whom the bell tolls. It tolls for thee.' ... might use that as my sig file



Come up with some tasty quotes later. What flavour would you like?
OK stop me if i'm wrong here but the "no man's an island" thing and the functionalist representation of society is merely another way of saying 'you scratch my back, I'll scratch yours.'

And even in that society there are winners and losers, some who get their back scratched a little more than they get their claws stuck into someone else's. It's those people that the book is talking about really. The kind of people that get a leg up off the back of someone else, in a ruthless, selfish way.
They're the people who seem to get on best and in real life it's not like much happens to them... they don't get deserted by all their mates, they don't die lonely old spinsters - it's dinner parties and holidays in the South of France all round.
And I'm reading beyond the book here, but I reckon if the author would probably reckon that the 'republic', 'continent', 'whole' thing is just useless twank spoon fed to the people blind enough to go along with it, while they're being shafted by other people left, right and centre.
So I guess a way to re-direct this thread would be to ask - do selfish people really suffer for their selfishness?
0
material breach
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#20
Report 14 years ago
#20
(Original post by eleenia)
So I guess a way to re-direct this thread would be to ask - do selfish people really suffer for their selfishness?
well depends if they value having trust worthy friends, if the do probably yes, if not no.
0
X
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Were you ever put in isolation at school?

Yes (279)
27.51%
No (735)
72.49%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed