Do you find the american accent annoying? Watch

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curryADD
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#61
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#61
(Original post by katiesado)
You tell me if there's a difference for you between them. Do you think Texans sound ignorant? They have that stigma a bit even here.
I am NOT IGNORANT. but then, I'm not really from Texas. Houston is the most UN-TEXAN area in Texas there is. If you think Texans sound ignorant; honey, you should visit Alabama.
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curryADD
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#62
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(Original post by spk)
I don't think it's the accent that makes people sound ignorant but what people are saying. The perception is that a sizeable proportion of Texans are ignorant, thus people have come to associate the accent with that preconception.

As with any society, the US is riddled with regional and class rivalries. The East Coast/New England accents probably have the highest status in the UK, as they are most similar to the received pronunciation (RP) of middle class English people.

Texans and Minnesotans on the other other hand are probably unfavourably judged because of their accents, rather like people from Birmingham or the West Country over here.

It's just snobbery.
precisely. but I can tell you that to a westerner (moi, a professed from nowhere girl <- but lived MOST of her life in California) the colonial accents sound extremely nasal and less throaty....

like whats the pronunciation of caah instead of carr? (say car if your from the east USA *you should find you have trouble with the R*)

texans, for the most part, do not have a overly pronounced accent. you get into the states of arkansas; alabama; mississippi; or georgia; things suddenly seem to become aLOT slower and more "drawn out."

english people to me only sound cool if they dont have a really thick fast accent......
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Apollo
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#63
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(Original post by SciFi25)
I hate american accents!! I was in America for two weeks on a tour of California, Utah, Arizona and Nevada. We had so much trouble understanding what the americans were saying. I tried to buy a pack of ciggarettes just outside of Zion National Park, it took us about four minutes to understand that the reason the age limit was 19 was because Utah was a MORMON state. We thought the woman was saying it was a MORON state. Which makes sense cos why the hell do they have a 19 restriction on ciggies?? (We got our teacher to buy them for us so we didn't go without in the end!!)

Also on the way back out we were staying in some craphole town I think it was and the waitress had to ask what we meant by cheers. Jesus christ ur the ones who did the bloody show!

American accents to me just sound so poor. Why is it you cannot pronounce words correctly?? Its Aluminium, deal with it. They are not pants, they are trousers. They are not fries, they are chips. They are not chips they are crisps. Goddam you! Learn the language you try to speak.
That's quite stupid really. Ever heard of a cultural difference?
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curryADD
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(Original post by PadFoot90)
That's quite stupid really. Ever heard of a cultural difference?
of course he hasn't. that would be why he is self-professed "english."

:rolleyes:
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Sam2k
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#65
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(Original post by curryADD)
I am NOT IGNORANT. but then, I'm not really from Texas. Houston is the most UN-TEXAN area in Texas there is. If you think Texans sound ignorant; honey, you should visit Alabama.
I've been to alabama. That is one funny place.
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katiesado
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#66
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(Original post by curryADD)
I am NOT IGNORANT. but then, I'm not really from Texas. Houston is the most UN-TEXAN area in Texas there is. If you think Texans sound ignorant; honey, you should visit Alabama.
I didn't say all people from Texas are ignorant, in fact I kind of like the Texan sensibility. I said they have that STIGMA of being ignorant. And it isn't just people from Texas. To many Northerners, Southerners sound ignorant. Don't blame me, blame The Beverly Hillbillies and Cletus from the Simpsons for that rep.
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psychic_satori
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#67
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(Original post by SamTheMan)
Are you american though? Where did you meet the person from Chesapeake and the Newfie?
I think I first heard about the Chesapeake accent in Bill Bryson's book, Notes from a Big Country (hope I got the title right) and as I found that really curious, I read some other stuff about it. As he used to live in Vermont, which is in New England, he talks a lot about the New England accents. As I said, you can still find very very old people that still say "Norritch" when talking about Norwich or any of the many town names that come from English town names. I was pleasantly surprised to find out that they pronouced Worcester (second biggest city in Massachusetts after Boston) "Woosta" as I used to live in Worcester, UK. But apparently people from outside New England often pronounce it wrong.
I went on a short trip to Cape Cod and during the bus trip, the bus driver who clearly wasn't from around there kept pronouncing the town names wrong (well differently from the locals). He said "East Ham" for Eastham, "Chat Ham" for Chatham...
Yeah, I'm American. I met the Chesapeake girl at my university. She was my roommate in my first year there. Although, her accent was a little less pronounced because she had moved to that area when she was little, but her parents were from different places.

I sat beside the Newfie when I was watching a hockey game. We were both cheering for the same team, so we talked.

Actually, I think most Northeast people pronounce the English-derived town names correctly (or close to it) because there are so many towns after cities in the UK. I know that I would pronounce "Norwich" as you said older people did, so I don't think it is entirely lost. Just as Greenwich Village in NYC is not "Green wich." The problem with pronunciation is when you get people from the west, who are used to Spanish place names, trying to say the English ones in the east.
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Aeris
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#68
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(Original post by curryADD)
I am NOT IGNORANT. but then, I'm not really from Texas. Houston is the most UN-TEXAN area in Texas there is. If you think Texans sound ignorant; honey, you should visit Alabama.
I visited some relatives in Montgomery, Alabama last summer. I absolutely despise the accent there. I cut all of my conversations with people who had a thick accent short.
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ShadowStorm
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#69
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(Original post by psychic_satori)
Yeah, I'm American. I met the Chesapeake girl at my university.
Ah, Chesapeake. For the longest time in my head I pronounced it wrong. (Which is why when I was in America I make sure to try and let someone else say the place names before I end up sounding stupid )
I for one love the southern American accent, it does vary *greatly* from place to place. Even among each state, it varies a lot.
Apparently, someone told me when I went over there that I sound like I'm from New England (even though I'm a Brit)... but that's because I lost my accent after 2 days (when you're the only one there it's very hard to keep it, plus also I had to drop it when my friend's sister started accidentally mimicking it (a British accent done by an American, always comes out sounding posh even to British ears).
That said, I came back and everyone laughed at me for having a very American accent. I tried to drop it, but it took me 2 days to get my old accent back again!
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psychic_satori
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#70
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(Original post by ShadowStorm)
Ah, Chesapeake. For the longest time in my head I pronounced it wrong. (Which is why when I was in America I make sure to try and let someone else say the place names before I end up sounding stupid )
I for one love the southern American accent, it does vary *greatly* from place to place. Even among each state, it varies a lot.
Apparently, someone told me when I went over there that I sound like I'm from New England (even though I'm a Brit)... but that's because I lost my accent after 2 days (when you're the only one there it's very hard to keep it, plus also I had to drop it when my friend's sister started accidentally mimicking it (a British accent done by an American, always comes out sounding posh even to British ears).
That said, I came back and everyone laughed at me for having a very American accent. I tried to drop it, but it took me 2 days to get my old accent back again!
I do the same thing. I really try to avoid catching the local accent when I travel, but it's impossible for me. Actually, I don't even have to travel, if I have a long conversation with someone with an accent, I'll start to talk more like that person. Then I have to try to switch my brain back to my normal speech. I'm always worried that sometime I won't catch myself and someone will think that I'm mocking. I have the most trouble slipping out of the southern US accent. I'm not sure if it is from travelling there so much, or if it stems from having so many southern relatives that I've learned to mimic over the years.
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curryADD
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(Original post by psychic_satori)
I do the same thing. I really try to avoid catching the local accent when I travel, but it's impossible for me. Actually, I don't even have to travel, if I have a long conversation with someone with an accent, I'll start to talk more like that person. Then I have to try to switch my brain back to my normal speech. I'm always worried that sometime I won't catch myself and someone will think that I'm mocking. I have the most trouble slipping out of the southern US accent. I'm not sure if it is from travelling there so much, or if it stems from having so many southern relatives that I've learned to mimic over the years.
southern accents that are thick are annoying. northern accents that are thick are annoying. western accents are always perfect

words I say with improper pronounciation:

water- wader
is most likely the most prominanate feature of my accent. also, like most californians, I uptalk slightly and quite fast nearing the end of my sentences.
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NDGAARONDI
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#72
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(Original post by canuck)
I like all british accents.
I wonder if accents in Northern Ireland constitute British or Irish. Anyone know?
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blissy
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#73
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(Original post by NDGAARONDI)
I wonder if accents in Northern Ireland constitute British or Irish. Anyone know?
British, I think.

*sniggers as she imagines the NI accent + the sentence "how now brown cow"*
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spk
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#74
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(Original post by blissy)
British, I think.
Irish, I think.
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SamTheMan
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#75
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(Original post by spk)
Irish, I think.
Irish and British but let's avoid this becoming another NI debate. Most NI consider themselves to have Irish heritage (by that I mean heritage from Ireland) and British heritage and to be loyal to the British crown, just as all of Ireland was in the 19th century. Irish and British don't have to be antagonisms. Ireland is part of the British Isles after all...
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spk
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#76
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(Original post by SamTheMan)
Irish and British but let's avoid this becoming another NI debate. Most NI consider themselves to have Irish heritage (by that I mean heritage from Ireland) and British heritage and to be loyal to the British crown, just as all of Ireland was in the 19th century. Irish and British don't have to be antagonisms. Ireland is part of the British Isles after all...
Yes but their accent is Irish. They live in Northern Ireland, not North West Britain. Even though Eire is part of the British Isles, no one would ever say that people from the Republic have a British accent.
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ad_infinitum87
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#77
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I find various British accents more annoying actually :rolleyes:

-Becs
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Fredricks
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#78
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Im not really bothered by the American accents that much, I live in the deep south by the way although im from the UK. What is annoying is the way that they dont think they have an accent at all, and they interupt you to say they love your accent... I also yelled at them all last week for saying 'erb... if theres a silent h then they also wouldnt say veHicle!
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psychic_satori
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#79
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(Original post by Fredricks)
Im not really bothered by the American accents that much, I live in the deep south by the way although im from the UK. What is annoying is the way that they dont think they have an accent at all, and they interupt you to say they love your accent... I also yelled at them all last week for saying 'erb... if theres a silent h then they also wouldnt say veHicle!
About the word "herb," I guess it depends on whether it was used as in the cooking ingredients or as in a nickname for Herbert. Herb can be pronounced either way, and generally, the educated American version is pronounced without the h. I had a teacher in high school who would flip her lid anytime someone pronounced the h. "Do you want people to think you come from a broken home?!"
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LostRiot
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#80
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I think George Dubya, sounds like a ****.
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