Which course do you think suits me best? And which institutions?

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futurestudent19
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Hi, I wish to return to university in 2019 to study - I'm just lost with what to study and where! I'm a 28 year old male from the North East-ish - potentially I'd like to study anywhere in the UK though I'm gravitating strongly towards university, campus based universities, which are internationally renowned and respected - so basically think Oxbridge/Russell Group/etc.

My academic background is strongly leaning towards the arts - I've studied English Literature at degree level - I dabbled in modules within most disciplines though and have interests and a willingness to engage and learn in literally every subject.

So what do I study/what level/where?

I have a BA already, do I choose to do an undergraduate degree in a similar or even completely contrasting subject? I enjoy sport/music/politics/nature/the world around us/ - I like to debate and engage and am creative/intelligent and worldly wise/cultured/well travelled.

My top choices - (destinations aside) are Law and Medicine. I have the English degree so I possess the transferable skills to take on a Law course proficiently .... but what discipline and area of Law! LLB? Or.... Yikes :yikes: choices/decisions/options!

Potential future careers would be, obviously a career in law of some description. I'm leaning towards a barrister - what do I need to do in order to take the bar, once I do attain a Law qualification. I'm also open to studying, at least in part - anywhere in the wrld and then subsequently praciticing anywhere in the country (London/Manchester/Bristol and Edinburgh ideally ) but would take a any potential careers to a global stage.

i want reform and change - the world is an unjust and unequal place - in every enviornment and context and in every walk of life from the bottom to the top - and if I can change people's lives and how the world works I'd be satisfied - which leads me to the potential second career/course - medicine - pretty much similar criteria to the above and similar reasons - but things that put me off - the length of the course definitely - 7 years is a big commintment for anyone but for a guy in the twilight of his 20s it's probably a bridge too far - I also love animals, so vet med is a potential maybe too - yet because of his complexity and diversity it's arguably more difficult than human med which is tough in itself!

A post graduate degree in English is a maybe too - Bristol, Leeds or Magdalen College, Oxford (Wilde's stomping ground) would be the ideals maybe Goldsmiths, York, Warwick,, Cambridge, Durham, Edinburgh (bit reluctant to do a 4 year course but the subsidised tuition fees are appealing and Edinburgh is a lovely city) - maybe UCL and Kings too ....

So, that's the list of potential options .... help me guys! Pleaaaaase.

Cillian
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ageshallnot
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(Original post by futurestudent19)
Hi, I wish to return to university in 2019 to study - I'm just lost with what to study and where! I'm a 28 year old male from the North East-ish - potentially I'd like to study anywhere in the UK though I'm gravitating strongly towards university, campus based universities, which are internationally renowned and respected - so basically think Oxbridge/Russell Group/etc.

My academic background is strongly leaning towards the arts - I've studied English Literature at degree level - I dabbled in modules within most disciplines though and have interests and a willingness to engage and learn in literally every subject.

So what do I study/what level/where?

I have a BA already, do I choose to do an undergraduate degree in a similar or even completely contrasting subject? I enjoy sport/music/politics/nature/the world around us/ - I like to debate and engage and am creative/intelligent and worldly wise/cultured/well travelled.

My top choices - (destinations aside) are Law and Medicine. I have the English degree so I possess the transferable skills to take on a Law course proficiently .... but what discipline and area of Law! LLB? Or.... Yikes :yikes: choices/decisions/options!

Potential future careers would be, obviously a career in law of some description. I'm leaning towards a barrister - what do I need to do in order to take the bar, once I do attain a Law qualification. I'm also open to studying, at least in part - anywhere in the wrld and then subsequently praciticing anywhere in the country (London/Manchester/Bristol and Edinburgh ideally ) but would take a any potential careers to a global stage.

i want reform and change - the world is an unjust and unequal place - in every enviornment and context and in every walk of life from the bottom to the top - and if I can change people's lives and how the world works I'd be satisfied - which leads me to the potential second career/course - medicine - pretty much similar criteria to the above and similar reasons - but things that put me off - the length of the course definitely - 7 years is a big commintment for anyone but for a guy in the twilight of his 20s it's probably a bridge too far - I also love animals, so vet med is a potential maybe too - yet because of his complexity and diversity it's arguably more difficult than human med which is tough in itself!

A post graduate degree in English is a maybe too - Bristol, Leeds or Magdalen College, Oxford (Wilde's stomping ground) would be the ideals maybe Goldsmiths, York, Warwick,, Cambridge, Durham, Edinburgh (bit reluctant to do a 4 year course but the subsidised tuition fees are appealing and Edinburgh is a lovely city) - maybe UCL and Kings too ....

So, that's the list of potential options .... help me guys! Pleaaaaase.

Cillian
One point to consider is that you won't get funding for a second undergraduate degree unless you apply for certain health related subjects.

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nexttime
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(Original post by futurestudent19)
i want reform and change - the world is an unjust and unequal place - in every enviornment and context and in every walk of life from the bottom to the top - and if I can change people's lives and how the world works I'd be satisfied - which leads me to the potential second career/course - medicine -
I don't really see how that links? How would a doctor be helping tackle inequality? Perhaps you could in public health and advising health policy, but you don't need to be a doctor to enter that. An MSc in public health or similar is a good place to start there, and takes a year not 7! Perhaps something to look into?
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futurestudent19
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(Original post by ageshallnot)
One point to consider is that you won't get funding for a second undergraduate degree unless you apply for certain health related subjects.

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I have mitigating circumstances which work in my favour so I am confident I can get substantial financial help from the government and the institution - in all likelihood I'll self-fund which effectively rules out medicine.
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futurestudent19
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(Original post by nexttime)
I don't really see how that links? How would a doctor be helping tackle inequality? Perhaps you could in public health and advising health policy, but you don't need to be a doctor to enter that. An MSc in public health or similar is a good place to start there, and takes a year not 7! Perhaps something to look into?
How can a doctor NOT tackle inequality? Getting someone to the optimum level mentally and physically at very least holistically breeds a happy positive healthy society, which, by proxy, effectively eliminates inequality? So, indirectly it does.
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nexttime
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(Original post by futurestudent19)
How can a doctor NOT tackle inequality? Getting someone to the optimum level mentally and physically at very least holistically breeds a happy positive healthy society, which, by proxy, effectively eliminates inequality? So, indirectly it does.
I guess you aren't actively contributing to inequality. But low income individuals still have vastly poorer health outcomes - poorer living conditions, poorer work conditions, poorer diet, poorer education about health, more vulnerable to addiction, homelessness. As a doctor you still discharge homeless people back to the streets. You deal with the direct results of inequality, but I personally wouldn't count that as 'tackling' it at its route cause.

Public health and politicians, on the other hand, can do exactly that.

I still think its an odd motivation to be choosing medicine specifically. Other than public health the other exception would of course be if you then dedicated to working in less developed places or disaster zones. But then if your aim was to truly make a difference public health is still probably better.
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