Revising for Classical Civilization

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hannahly
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Hi, Im currently studying Class Civ AQA for A level.
This year I'm doing the Aeneid and Greek Tragedy (Oedipus, Antigone, Medea and Hippolytus)
I'm also resitting Homer's Iliad from AS.
I'm really struggling to revise and write essays well, does anyone have any tips?
Thanks
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999tigger
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(Original post by hannahly)
Hi, Im currently studying Class Civ AQA for A level.
This year I'm doing the Aeneid and Greek Tragedy (Oedipus, Antigone, Medea and Hippolytus)
I'm also resitting Homer's Iliad from AS.
I'm really struggling to revise and write essays well, does anyone have any tips?
Thanks
Same as for any subject.

Good notes >> revision note>>>practice exams>>review>>practice exams.

If you dont understand the core material you cant make good notes which in turn prevents you writing decent essays.
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hannahly
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(Original post by 999tigger)
Same as for any subject.

Good notes >> revision note>>>practice exams>>review>>practice exams.

If you dont understand the core material you cant make good notes which in turn prevents you writing decent essays.
I dont find it easy to revise this subject like that actually. I know the plays well but writing about them is the hard bit due to themes etc.
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999tigger
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(Original post by hannahly)
I dont find it easy to revise this subject like that actually. I know the plays well but writing about them is the hard bit due to themes etc.
Thats where your notes are letting you down. If you cant get to grips with the core material including themes and characters, then you arent going to have the raw material to write the essays. I can only suggest you buy some decent revision books plus watch some documentaries till it goes in. It isnt much different from English Literature.


If you know the structure of the plays then you are going to have to focus on the significance and underlying messages or values. Thing like fate and different Greek or Roman values. If you are year 13 you have to get on top now, but year 12 then you have a lot more time to nail it.
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Classics_Teacher
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I agree with what's already been said. From my experience of marking, students don't always spot the overlapping themes between plays, so while they often do (reasonably) well on the 5, 10 and 20 mark questions, they really come unstuck at the 40-marker.

Mind mapping can be very useful for themes, and flow charts can be useful for getting what happens when (and in which play!) sorted in your mind, especially with a guy called Creon popping up in all four plays...!

Also, see if your school/college library (or failing that, your Classics teacher) has any useful books on staging and themes in Greek tragedy. The following three books will be particularly useful to you:

Euripides' Hippolytus, by Sophie Mills
Euripides' Medea, by William Allan (both of these are part of the series Duckworth Companions to Greek and Roman Tragedy)

Looking at Antigone by David Stuttard (published by Bloomsbury)

Hope this helps!
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Mammmamia
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I'm doing the same topics and I find it easier to write the essays by basing the structure around key words and concepts rather than the plot timeline. For the Aeneid I always talk about Mos Maiorum (e.g. Aeneas taking the Penates), tutelage (Aeneas to Pallas), pietas, fides (faith to one's country), and for Greek tragedies you could use oikos, polis, sophrosune, moicheia etc. My teacher for the Aeneid doesn't tell us about latin words or concepts we can use (he only ever talks about the flattery to Augustus) so I've just looked up concepts and translations by myself and put them into essays.Good luck with your exams!
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hannahly
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(Original post by Classics_Teacher)
I agree with what's already been said. From my experience of marking, students don't always spot the overlapping themes between plays, so while they often do (reasonably) well on the 5, 10 and 20 mark questions, they really come unstuck at the 40-marker.

Mind mapping can be very useful for themes, and flow charts can be useful for getting what happens when (and in which play!) sorted in your mind, especially with a guy called Creon popping up in all four plays...!

Also, see if your school/college library (or failing that, your Classics teacher) has any useful books on staging and themes in Greek tragedy. The following three books will be particularly useful to you:

Euripides' Hippolytus, by Sophie Mills
Euripides' Medea, by William Allan (both of these are part of the series Duckworth Companions to Greek and Roman Tragedy)

Looking at Antigone by David Stuttard (published by Bloomsbury)

Hope this helps!
Thank you! Do you mark exam papers then or?
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