I’m going to fail English Lit at this rate! Please help me!

Watch
AngelStarfire
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#1
I suck at English Lit so bad! We’re having our mocks on Feb 6th and I still have no understanding of A Christmas Carol at all!(T^T ).

I don’t really know how to structure my PEAL paragraphs plus my teacher won’t let us take our Christmas Carol books home with us until the same week of the test. Our notes in our book are terrible and I can’t figure out anything about A Christmas Carol. I’m just screwed.

I really don’t want to fail plus I want to grasp a better understanding of the novella so that I’m prepared for the mock. My grade for English Lit is a grade 6 but I want to aim for a 7,8 or even a 9(but that’s a stretch for me).

Any advice on what to do? I watch Mr Bruff and other YouTubers but I still don’t feel prepared or understand anything.

Please help! Thank you in advance (>_<!)

I forgot to mention that my exam board is WJEC
0
reply
Euci
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#2
Report 3 years ago
#2
(Original post by AngelStarfire)
I suck at English Lit so bad! We’re having our mocks on Feb 6th and I still have no understanding of A Christmas Carol at all!(T^T ).

I don’t really know how to structure my PEAL paragraphs plus my teacher won’t let us take our Christmas Carol books home with us until the same week of the test. Our notes in our book are terrible and I can’t figure out anything about A Christmas Carol. I’m just screwed.

I really don’t want to fail plus I want to grasp a better understanding of the novella so that I’m prepared for the mock. My grade is English Lit is a grade 6 but I want to aim for a 7,8 or even a 9(but that’s a stretch for me).

Any advice on what to do? I watch Mr Bruff and other YouTubers but I still don’t feel prepared or understand anything.

Please help! Thank you in advance (>_<!)
To be fair you don’t really need Eng Lit for the future but you do need language

Try past papers
0
reply
GcseStudent9
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#3
Report 3 years ago
#3
(Original post by AngelStarfire)
I suck at English Lit so bad! We’re having our mocks on Feb 6th and I still have no understanding of A Christmas Carol at all!(T^T ).

I don’t really know how to structure my PEAL paragraphs plus my teacher won’t let us take our Christmas Carol books home with us until the same week of the test. Our notes in our book are terrible and I can’t figure out anything about A Christmas Carol. I’m just screwed.

I really don’t want to fail plus I want to grasp a better understanding of the novella so that I’m prepared for the mock. My grade for English Lit is a grade 6 but I want to aim for a 7,8 or even a 9(but that’s a stretch for me).

Any advice on what to do? I watch Mr Bruff and other YouTubers but I still don’t feel prepared or understand anything.

Please help! Thank you in advance (>_<!)
Same haha
1
reply
Psaa
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#4
Report 3 years ago
#4
I find it useful to read a model answer - one that is close to full marks then almost copy the structure. I would use a lot of quotes and embed them into your text, i'm with edexcel but this answer nearly scored full marks... (out of 20)


How is the character of The Ghost of Christmas Past presented in A Christmas Carol?



In Stave 2 Dickens presents The Ghost of Christmas Past as a supernatural being whom “wore a tunic of purest white” furthermore “Its hair which hung about its neck and down its back was white as if with age”. Here the adjective “white” is repeated which emphasises the “purity” and untainted wellbeing of the Ghost. This is due to the fact that “white” has semantics of heaven and sterility. This feeling is imperative during the novella because these semantics could perhaps represent what Scrooge once was - “innocent” and wholesome. I know these feelings have now changed due to Scrooge’s dismal mind-set of wishing “workhouses” and “prisons” to the children of society. This perhaps parallels him with Marley’s destiny of “bound down” to hell. The reader wants Scrooge to change back to the “pure” man he once was, therefore creating a strong sense of rapport between the reader and Scrooge. The Ghost of Christmas past is presented to implement this change pleasing the audience and ultimately linking with the key theme of redemption.

Throughout Stave 2 the Ghost of Christmas Past is presented as a helper to Scrooge. The Ghost also consistently evokes a sense of empathy all around Stave 2 contrasting massively with the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come. Near the start of Stave 2 these quotes are used “Your lip is trembling” and “what is that upon your cheek?” Here the ghost is enquiring into the emotional state of Scrooge. The verb “trembling” represents the harsh reality of how mentally feeble Scrooge really is. This has strong connections with the theme of vulnerability highlighted through Scrooge, in doing so it creates a substantial effect on the reader as for Scrooge is reverting the typical stereotype of a man being vigorous and powerful. This is all due to the presentation of The Ghost of Christmas Past. “What is that upon your cheek?” Here the Ghost of Christmas Past has been presented in such a way that it is pitying Scrooge. “Upon your cheek” suggests that there is a stagnant tear on his “cheek” which Dickens has evidently used to symbolise the shift in Scrooges emotions and he is no longer the diminishing character we saw in Stave 1. This links back to the Ghost being presented as empathetic because it is caring for Scrooge.

The Ghost of Christmas Past is perhaps presented as Dicken’s mouthpiece during Stave 2 I know this because Dickens strongly believed in social “welfare”. In Dickensian England there was a vast social hierarchy which Dickens passionately detested conceivably because ‘Dicken’s childhood was overshadowed by his father- John’s money wows’. Consequently, The Ghost of Christmas Past is presented as something that wants to alter Scrooge’s capitalistic viewpoint, paralleling Dickens’. Near the end of Stave 2 after seeing Fezziwig the Ghost enquired “What is the matter?” this interrogative sentence suggests that the ghost is seriously affecting the typical dispassionate Scrooge. The verb “matter” could be interpreted as the Ghost almost mocking Scrooge relating to a ‘business matter’ or as the ghost pondering into the emotional state of Scrooge. The reply could perhaps come as a shock to the reader “no. I should like to be able to say a word or two to my clerk just now!” The exclamatory sentence emphasises the restlessness in Scrooge and that he is finally changing. “A word or two” suggests that this may not just be a one off but actually a change for good. The key theme of recovery is personified in this quotation due to the fact that Scrooge wants to do something about his actions.
1
reply
AngelStarfire
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#5
(Original post by Psaa)
I find it useful to read a model answer - one that is close to full marks then almost copy the structure. I would use a lot of quotes and embed them into your text, i'm with edexcel but this answer nearly scored full marks... (out of 20)


How is the character of The Ghost of Christmas Past presented in A Christmas Carol?



In Stave 2 Dickens presents The Ghost of Christmas Past as a supernatural being whom “wore a tunic of purest white” furthermore “Its hair which hung about its neck and down its back was white as if with age”. Here the adjective “white” is repeated which emphasises the “purity” and untainted wellbeing of the Ghost. This is due to the fact that “white” has semantics of heaven and sterility. This feeling is imperative during the novella because these semantics could perhaps represent what Scrooge once was - “innocent” and wholesome. I know these feelings have now changed due to Scrooge’s dismal mind-set of wishing “workhouses” and “prisons” to the children of society. This perhaps parallels him with Marley’s destiny of “bound down” to hell. The reader wants Scrooge to change back to the “pure” man he once was, therefore creating a strong sense of rapport between the reader and Scrooge. The Ghost of Christmas past is presented to implement this change pleasing the audience and ultimately linking with the key theme of redemption.

Throughout Stave 2 the Ghost of Christmas Past is presented as a helper to Scrooge. The Ghost also consistently evokes a sense of empathy all around Stave 2 contrasting massively with the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come. Near the start of Stave 2 these quotes are used “Your lip is trembling” and “what is that upon your cheek?” Here the ghost is enquiring into the emotional state of Scrooge. The verb “trembling” represents the harsh reality of how mentally feeble Scrooge really is. This has strong connections with the theme of vulnerability highlighted through Scrooge, in doing so it creates a substantial effect on the reader as for Scrooge is reverting the typical stereotype of a man being vigorous and powerful. This is all due to the presentation of The Ghost of Christmas Past. “What is that upon your cheek?” Here the Ghost of Christmas Past has been presented in such a way that it is pitying Scrooge. “Upon your cheek” suggests that there is a stagnant tear on his “cheek” which Dickens has evidently used to symbolise the shift in Scrooges emotions and he is no longer the diminishing character we saw in Stave 1. This links back to the Ghost being presented as empathetic because it is caring for Scrooge.

The Ghost of Christmas Past is perhaps presented as Dicken’s mouthpiece during Stave 2 I know this because Dickens strongly believed in social “welfare”. In Dickensian England there was a vast social hierarchy which Dickens passionately detested conceivably because ‘Dicken’s childhood was overshadowed by his father- John’s money wows’. Consequently, The Ghost of Christmas Past is presented as something that wants to alter Scrooge’s capitalistic viewpoint, paralleling Dickens’. Near the end of Stave 2 after seeing Fezziwig the Ghost enquired “What is the matter?” this interrogative sentence suggests that the ghost is seriously affecting the typical dispassionate Scrooge. The verb “matter” could be interpreted as the Ghost almost mocking Scrooge relating to a ‘business matter’ or as the ghost pondering into the emotional state of Scrooge. The reply could perhaps come as a shock to the reader “no. I should like to be able to say a word or two to my clerk just now!” The exclamatory sentence emphasises the restlessness in Scrooge and that he is finally changing. “A word or two” suggests that this may not just be a one off but actually a change for good. The key theme of recovery is personified in this quotation due to the fact that Scrooge wants to do something about his actions.
Thank you for this! It’ll be really helpful!(^~^ ) my exam board is WJEC
0
reply
Psaa
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#6
Report 3 years ago
#6
(Original post by AngelStarfire)
Thank you for this! It’ll be really helpful!(^~^ ) my exam board is WJEC
Really good exam board for english
0
reply
Anniex02
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#7
Report 3 years ago
#7
My best advice would be to remember a few key quotes from the text and a little analysis and then put your own ideas into it, once I switched teachers and started to do this I went from a 4 to a 7 in English! its all about how perceptive you can be by analysing the text and a few quotes, hope this helps! an good luck for your exam, I'm sure you'll do great
0
reply
lauriebeth7
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#8
Report 3 years ago
#8
You can get the book for free on iBooks I think, at least my school could last year
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

What factors affect your mental health the most right now?

Anxiousness about lockdown easing (145)
4.85%
Uncertainty around my education (441)
14.75%
Uncertainty around my future career prospects (336)
11.24%
Lack of purpose or motivation (418)
13.98%
Lack of support system (eg. teachers, counsellors, delays in care) (139)
4.65%
Impact of lockdown on physical health (180)
6.02%
Loneliness (256)
8.56%
Financial worries (109)
3.65%
Concern about myself or my loves ones getting/having been ill (121)
4.05%
Exposure to negative news/social media (135)
4.52%
Lack of real life entertainment (162)
5.42%
Lack of confidence in making big life decisions (264)
8.83%
Worry about missed opportunities during the pandemic (283)
9.47%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed