alfie0101
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How many hours of revision per night to get 7/8/9’s?

How many hours on weekends?
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Blue_Cow
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(Original post by alfie0101)
How many hours of revision per night to get 7/8/9’s?

How many hours on weekends?
There is no algorithm that you can use to accurately calculate how many hours you need to get 7/8/9.

Do whatever's comfortable.
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alfie0101
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(Original post by Blue_Cow)
There is no algorithm that you can use to accurately calculate how many hours you need to get 7/8/9.
Of course. Well from peoples experience of accessing the high grades they can share how many hours of revision they did...
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GcseStudent9
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(Original post by alfie0101)
How many hours of revision per night to get 7/8/9’s?

How many hours on weekends?

DEpends whats your predicted grades
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Blue_Cow
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(Original post by alfie0101)
Of course. Well from peoples experience of accessing the high grades they can share how many hours of revision they did...
It's not going to be useful knowing how many hours people revise... We all have different attention spans/revision methods.

Just do whatever's comfortable.
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alfie0101
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(Original post by GcseStudent9)
DEpends whats your predicted grades
Two 9’s
Three 8’s
One 7
One A
Two 6’s
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alfie0101
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(Original post by Blue_Cow)
It's not going to be useful knowing how many hours people revise... We all have different attention spans/revision methods.

Just do whatever's comfortable.
Indeed.
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dsmith23
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Setting a rigid amount of time for revising is pretty pointless if you're not revising effectively. You've got to find ways that suit you and actually allow you to absorb the information you're trying to learn - for some this involves re-writing notes many times, making posters, making flash cards and then looking through them periodically. try different things and see what suits you best, and then see how you're improving. Once you know what works best you'll have a much better idea of not just how long you need to spend revising, but what exactly it is that you need to revise.

One of the generally accepted best ways to test your knowledge and find out what you need to revise is using past papers. Do as many as you can for each subject (although try not to exhaust all of them too far before your actual exams), see where your weaknesses are, and apply the revision techniques that you find help you best.
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alfie0101
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(Original post by dsmith23)
Setting a rigid amount of time for revising is pretty pointless if you're not revising effectively. You've got to find ways that suit you and actually allow you to absorb the information you're trying to learn - for some this involves re-writing notes many times, making posters, making flash cards and then looking through them periodically. try different things and see what suits you best, and then see how you're improving. Once you know what works best you'll have a much better idea of not just how long you need to spend revising, but what exactly it is that you need to revise.

One of the generally accepted best ways to test your knowledge and find out what you need to revise is using past papers. Do as many as you can for each subject (although try not to exhaust all of them too far before your actual exams), see where your weaknesses are, and apply the revision techniques that you find help you best.
When do people normally start revising? (I’ve already started.) let’s say I didn’t start revising until mid feb, would there still b time?
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dsmith23
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(Original post by alfie0101)
When do people normally start revising? (I’ve already started.) let’s say I didn’t start revising until mid feb, would there still b time?
Depends how academic the individual is. I didn't turn up to lessons, didn't make notes or do revision and I came out with a good set of GCSEs (although it should be noted - they're far, far from stellar). Just do enough so that you feel like you're keeping up with the new content, and not forgetting the stuff you did earlier in the year.

Starting now is definitely a good thing. Just try to find what works for you and keep at it and you'll be better prepared than the majority of people.
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Annoyn
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My university lecturer told me to never do any more than 4 hours of solid revision. You can't take much more than that in in a day.

Now that doesn't mean only four hours TOTAL. That's four hours with lots of short breaks in between . Preferably at 20 minute intervals. (Don't look at social media then as that's taking on new info( I mean breaks to like stand up or get a drink or use bathroom.

And then a lunch break.

So probably do like a 9-5 day (when not in school) but with revision breaks.

Trust me this worked so much vetter than when I tried to do 12 hours a day. Only time should spend more than that is day before exams (cramming).

Start early , eat well, drink water, sleep and don't overdo it .
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