Svesh
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Just wondering is it easy to find jobs quickly after graduating and also many years after that so you can live a comfortable life. As medicine pretty much gives you a guaranteed job for life.
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UWS
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If you get a 2:1 and have some experience working then it shouldn't be too difficult to get an interview. Of course, you will need to put in the effort to perform well in the interview but that's another story. Also it does depend on the role since some roles do require more experience than others, so apply carefully.

I got my job before I graduated, I still work there now and I'm on a decent salary.
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Kaffka
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(Original post by UWS)
If you get a 2:1 and have some experience working then it shouldn't be too difficult to get an interview. Of course, you will need to put in the effort to perform well in the interview but that's another story. Also it does depend on the role since some roles do require more experience than others, so apply carefully.

I got my job before I graduated, I still work there now and I'm on a decent salary.
Hey what do you consider 'a decent salary' at your age (how old are you btw?) I'm also contemplating CS but I'm in an okay paid corporate job and don't fancy dropping by 10k for the next 10 years before I build up experience.
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UWS
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(Original post by Kaffka)
Hey what do you consider 'a decent salary' at your age (how old are you btw?) I'm also contemplating CS but I'm in an okay paid corporate job and don't fancy dropping by 10k for the next 10 years before I build up experience.
I'm 24 and in IT so anything over 28k would be decent for me. I'm earning a bit more than that but that's the minimum salary that I would take if I got a new offer.
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Hammad(214508)
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Can Someone explain what that 2:1 or the other ratios mean at Uni? understand that the assignments, courseworks, exams, experiments... give credits but what is the ratio ? BTW I am an A level student
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username1207499
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It really depends on how good / committed you are.
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Kaffka
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(Original post by UWS)
I'm 24 and in IT so anything over 28k would be decent for me. I'm earning a bit more than that but that's the minimum salary that I would take if I got a new offer.
Hey UWS, that sounds decent. I'm happy for you. I'd be more than happy to take £28k now. I have a couple of friends doing software testing and webdev on 25-28k and they are pushing 30, hence my worry. Are you working in London or elsewhere? I love coding and would love to be a software dev but 'entry level' gigs seem to pay £20k and want you to have commercial experience.
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KeirCKF
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(Original post by aceplayyt)
Just wondering is it easy to find jobs quickly after graduating and also many years after that so you can live a comfortable life. As medicine pretty much gives you a guaranteed job for life.
It depends on your course content and interview.
If I am a boss at the company looking for IT for internet security, there is no reason for me to hire someone else shows no relevant course content and demonstrate no practical skill and knowledge on internet security.
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username2981082
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(Original post by Hammad(214508))
Can Someone explain what that 2:1 or the other ratios mean at Uni? understand that the assignments, courseworks, exams, experiments... give credits but what is the ratio ? BTW I am an A level student
The ratios represent marks as well as the final degree classification.

1st is first-class honours. This is the top grade you can get for your assignments and for the final degree classification.

2:1 is upper-second class honours. This is the minimum you should aim for as most employers will ask for a 2:1.

2:2 is lower-second class honours. You really don't want to get this grade as it is not that good.

3rd is just about a pass. Getting a third class is absolutely ****.
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Svesh
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I was thinking of making apps and iphone games in spare time and make some extra cash of ad revenue.
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Revolver72
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So, I graduated from my undergraduate in Computing Science last summer, and had a job offer (and so did all my friends). I graduated with a 2:1. I opted to return and do a masters instead, and have got a job offer for finishing my masters. I currently work with them as an intern-basis one day a week until I start in September, it's a neat arrangement that some graduate employers offer.

There's a pretty high demand for people with a Computing and IT background, although it totally depends on your field of choice. Computing is a wide spectrum of sub-disciplines; a job in Digital Forensics is significantly harder to find than one in, say, Front-End Development.

Some of the graduate schemes (QA Consulting/FDM/etc) are great in terms of guaranteeing you a job in computing, and there are permutations of this business model everywhere. But be wary of them; they work really well for some people (I actually have no fundamental problem with them - I'm not ****ging them), but the fine-print is worth the read. I know that many of them - including QA and FDM - offer training at which is unpaid, and often also have a two-year tie-in, meaning you can't leave in the first two years without incurring serious costs (£20,000) to reimburse the fees for the training they've supplied you. They often start at around a 21-22k salary, once your training period is over. This is underwhelming, but usually it progresses to 25k-ish after the first year. I have friends who work at one of these types of business and they have loved it so far. But definitely be aware of the fine print.

I'd also say that in terms of having the best chance of getting a graduate offer, those who have completed internships during their undergraduate have a competitive advantage. I did one between my third and fourth year. It's good fun, great experience, invaluable for the CV, and is usually paid on a rate of £16,000p/a, which whilst it might only be for ten weeks, is significantly higher than most student jobs! So a nice bonus, too.

If you look the right place, and I advise you get in early in the year - most of the good positions for summer/September close their application process in October of the year before - then you'll find something. I waited too late in my undergraduate to apply and so whilst I had a job offer there, the salary was ~21k ish. Applying earlier this time around for a job added about 8k to that.

You should stand a pretty good chance, particularly if you get a 2:1. Good luck, whatever you decide to do. Do you have ideas of where you want to go?
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Svesh
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(Original post by Revolver72)
So, I graduated from my undergraduate in Computing Science last summer, and had a job offer (and so did all my friends). I graduated with a 2:1. I opted to return and do a masters instead, and have got a job offer for finishing my masters. I currently work with them as an intern-basis one day a week until I start in September, it's a neat arrangement that some graduate employers offer.

There's a pretty high demand for people with a Computing and IT background, although it totally depends on your field of choice. Computing is a wide spectrum of sub-disciplines; a job in Digital Forensics is significantly harder to find than one in, say, Front-End Development.

Some of the graduate schemes (QA Consulting/FDM/etc) are great in terms of guaranteeing you a job in computing, and there are permutations of this business model everywhere. But be wary of them; they work really well for some people (I actually have no fundamental problem with them - I'm not ****ging them), but the fine-print is worth the read. I know that many of them - including QA and FDM - offer training at which is unpaid, and often also have a two-year tie-in, meaning you can't leave in the first two years without incurring serious costs (£20,000) to reimburse the fees for the training they've supplied you. They often start at around a 21-22k salary, once your training period is over. This is underwhelming, but usually it progresses to 25k-ish after the first year. I have friends who work at one of these types of business and they have loved it so far. But definitely be aware of the fine print.

I'd also say that in terms of having the best chance of getting a graduate offer, those who have completed internships during their undergraduate have a competitive advantage. I did one between my third and fourth year. It's good fun, great experience, invaluable for the CV, and is usually paid on a rate of £16,000p/a, which whilst it might only be for ten weeks, is significantly higher than most student jobs! So a nice bonus, too.

If you look the right place, and I advise you get in early in the year - most of the good positions for summer/September close their application process in October of the year before - then you'll find something. I waited too late in my undergraduate to apply and so whilst I had a job offer there, the salary was ~21k ish. Applying earlier this time around for a job added about 8k to that.

You should stand a pretty good chance, particularly if you get a 2:1. Good luck, whatever you decide to do. Do you have ideas of where you want to go?
Thanks for the reply very heplful indeed. I would like really like to go to UCL but I want to aim for oxford, cambridge and imperial depending on as results
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username3079870
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(Original post by Kaffka)
Hey UWS, that sounds decent. I'm happy for you. I'd be more than happy to take £28k now. I have a couple of friends doing software testing and webdev on 25-28k and they are pushing 30, hence my worry. Are you working in London or elsewhere? I love coding and would love to be a software dev but 'entry level' gigs seem to pay £20k and want you to have commercial experience.
As AWS said, it depends on how well you do at uni and how much experience you get. It also helps if you work with popular or cutting edge technology stacks. One of my first jobs after uni (about 10 years ago now!) was a Web App developer. I mainly used JavaScript with classic ASP. In hindsight Classic ASP wasn't a very marketable skill. Likewise I've heard of people who work in the public sector writing apps in VBScript. If it was 1998 that would be cool, but there just isn't a big demand for certain skills in tech sector so be careful.

Also bear in mind some people don't want the extra work that comes with a big pay scale. I know cloud engineers and network engineers who have to renew their AWS/Azure/Cisco certs every few years, so they are perpetually studying. They are all on north of 40k a year and in their early 30s (age wise). Some people couldn't be bothered with that, and are happy doing a role that pays them 25-30k a year but is less hassle/extra work. It's up to you to find that balance that's right for you. If you are prepared to work hard and keep your skills up to date, you can make a lot of money (which I would consider north of 45k a year).
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Svesh
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Is it even possible to make six figure salaries with cs degree then? If so what jobs would they be?
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SupremeEdgelord
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Very hard to find a long lasting job. After the great Kim-Trump war of late 2018 computers no longer work (EMPs from H-bombs, oh noes), so all computer science graduates have become prostitutes/rent bois to pay the bills.
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Daniel00
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(Original post by UWS)
I'm 24 and in IT so anything over 28k would be decent for me. I'm earning a bit more than that but that's the minimum salary that I would take if I got a new offer.
It really depends on what job your actually doing, that sounds like maintenance and server work, but I know people starting at 23 and start of with 60k with little to no experience in the industry because they know how to code
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Daniel00
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(Original post by aceplayyt)
Is it even possible to make six figure salaries with cs degree then? If so what jobs would they be?
Software Engineer, Cloud Computing (creating the servers but also selling them (you can earn comission on this)). Team leader of programming teams earn a lot. The trick is not to be the person that does all the work, but to be the person that manages everyone else and understands the whole project. So basically get into management as quick as possible so you dont have to do all the boring work
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username1207499
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(Original post by aceplayyt)
Is it even possible to make six figure salaries with cs degree then? If so what jobs would they be?
It’s possible but it’s not that easy haha

You can either go to the US or stay in Europe and work for top tier companies like Google, Palantir, Amazon etc or work for trading firms like Jump, Jane street etc

At these places you start on close to if not 6 figures
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username3079870
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(Original post by aceplayyt)
Is it even possible to make six figure salaries with cs degree then? If so what jobs would they be?
Absolutely, in fact I'd say it's probably one of the best sectors in terms of the number of people working in it with a 6 figure salary. You wouldn't find a software engineer in one of the "big 5" tech companies in California on anything less than 6 figures, for example.

In the UK, the roles that will earn big money are generally architect roles (e.g. software architect, cyber security architect, network architect etc...) and consultants (usually software engineering consultants or QA/sofware testing consultants). Consultants working exclusively for a previous employer are charging 140k for the year plus expenses on one project. They are self employed usually or sole traders (basically they work for themselves). I have worked with one consultant who paid off his mortgage by the age of 32.

The tech sector, after the financial sector, is probably one of the most lucrative sectors out there. How much money you want to make is really up to you and the effort you put in, and knowing your worth. The last one is crucial. Keep your skills up to date, get good experience and become excellent/experienced at something that is a high demand skill or a skill that few people have. For example, that 32 year old who paid off his mortgage was actually a specialist in Perl. They are rarer than hen's teeth, as the saying goes. So that's why he was able to get the big money.

Ultimately the main thing is to love tech I've found. Any architect or consultant I've ever met have been big tech geeks and the genuinely love it. They are also self motivated and are the kind of people who go out of their way to learn new things and take the initiative.
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