Mumtaz234
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One of the routes I would like to follow down is getting a degree in Ancient History followed by becoming a secondary school level teacher. Currently I am planning to take forward: History,Religious studies,Biology and Chemistry ( Although depending on how I feel during my a levels I wouldn't mind dropping Chemistry ).

Would I be able to become a History teacher with an Ancient History degree?

oh and I have a bonus questions I would like to ask. Not a fan of languages at all but extremely interested in ancient history, will I have to pick an ancient language to study if I decide to take this degree?
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04MR17
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(Original post by Mumtaz234)
One of the routes I would like to follow down is getting a degree in Ancient History followed by becoming a secondary school level teacher. Currently I am planning to take forward: History,Religious studies,Biology and Chemistry ( Although depending on how I feel during my a levels I wouldn't mind dropping Chemistry ).

Would I be able to become a History teacher with an Ancient History degree?

oh and I have a bonus questions I would like to ask. Not a fan of languages at all but extremely interested in ancient history, will I have to pick an ancient language to study if I decide to take this degree?
I shouldn't think that would be too much of a problem.:nah:

Do bear in mind though for long-term that a lot of secondary school syllabuses will have a lot of modern history, particularly at KS4, so think about that if you're so passionate about ancient history in particular.

For languages, it would probably depend on the particular course. I'd be surprised if there were no courses which didn't have ancient languages incorporated, but then you have to factor in what kind of university you'd like to study it. Research is the answer to your question.:yep:
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JackHambly
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You do not usually need to learn languages for an an Ancient History degree. Ancient history is different in this respect from Classical Studies or Classics, which require you to study languages to varying degrees. This is because as an ancient historian you’re more likely to receive a broader geographical choice in modules, such as the Middle East or Bronze Age Societies. However I cannot reccomend enough taking a language. Not only does it mean you can work from source material with your own critical interpretation (quintessential for a historian) but it is also more likely to get you a job. Most Ancient History teachers now are in private schools, where Latin is still on the syllabus. If you do decide to take this advice, I suggest you try to get into a Classical Studies programme (an in depth study of Rome and Greece with looser language requirements in relation to Classics) which will be looked at better.

From a history point of view, I agree with the person above, it should be fine but you’re more likely to be teaching about WW2 than pharsalus!
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