Jenny's1999
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Could you tell me some benefits and more importantly disadvantages about the course itself and the university? Thanks so much for responses
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Bobjim12
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Coventry is a dump.
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Epitype
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(Original post by Bobjim12)
Coventry is a dump.
It's not as bad as it seems really; I mean it's no London. Everything is in reach of the university (such as Cannon Park) and there are Amazon lockers on the campus, so you never really need to leave to get to Coventry.
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Bobjim12
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(Original post by Epitype)
It's not as bad as it seems really; I mean it's no London. Everything is in reach of the university (such as Cannon Park) and there are Amazon lockers on the campus, so you never really need to leave to get to Coventry.
That is true but if OP cannot afford to live in nice areas such as Leamington then they may have to live in Coventry.
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Epitype
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(Original post by Bobjim12)
That is true but if OP cannot afford to live in nice areas such as Leamington then they may have to live in Coventry.
True. But then again, you can house share with a few people in your second and third years to bring the price down on rent. You can get a nice house in Leamington for £82 per week with utilities; I managed to do it.
Also, OP, if you're reading this, please don't live in Cannon Park or Canley.
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Jenny's1999
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(Original post by Epitype)
True. But then again, you can house share with a few people in your second and third years to bring the price down on rent. You can get a nice house in Leamington for £82 per week with utilities; I managed to do it.
Also, OP, if you're reading this, please don't live in Cannon Park or Canley.
Thanks for the advice
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Harjot
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I'm in Cannon Park, it's a pretty nice area, no robberies and very decent houses. I don't go out, so there's no point living in Leam and stomaching the commute.

The rest of Canley is pure shite though, everyone gets robbed. As previously mentioned, Coventry is genuinely a dump. Campus is ok, and nice compared to Cov, depending on what you like to do, and while you're on it you don't really need to leave.

CS itself is decent, the course is good, but also full of ****. Like most top unis, it just relies on smart students doing well, rather than the actual teaching quality. Recruiters do seem to love CS students from Warwick, and banks can't seem to get enough either (they sponsor a couple of our modules with prizes).

There is no lecture capture for most modules, but they upload slides, and if you cram in the slides, there's a good chance of getting a 1st.
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Bluebell1234
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(Original post by Harjot)
I'm in Cannon Park, it's a pretty nice area, no robberies and very decent houses. I don't go out, so there's no point living in Leam and stomaching the commute.

The rest of Canley is pure shite though, everyone gets robbed. As previously mentioned, Coventry is genuinely a dump. Campus is ok, and nice compared to Cov, depending on what you like to do, and while you're on it you don't really need to leave.

CS itself is decent, the course is good, but also full of ****. Like most top unis, it just relies on smart students doing well, rather than the actual teaching quality. Recruiters do seem to love CS students from Warwick, and banks can't seem to get enough either (they sponsor a couple of our modules with prizes).

There is no lecture capture for most modules, but they upload slides, and if you cram in the slides, there's a good chance of getting a 1st.
Hi Im applying for CS at warwick. What makes you think it's maybe not good? Do you think the lecturers aren't good?
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Harjot
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(Original post by Bluebell1234)
Hi Im applying for CS at warwick. What makes you think it's maybe not good? Do you think the lecturers aren't good?
Some can't teach, some can (just happens to be the case at almost every uni).

The quality of the course is definitely good though (top 5-6), and the department is pretty chill and accommodating (they treat you like humans and actually want you to do well).

There is a lot of stress at times because coursework deadlines get crammed together, so you'll become an expert at consecutive allnighters, which is probably a desirable skill somewhere lol.

Besides Oxbridge and Imperial, Warwick is defo the next tier for CS, and employers absolutely love CS (banks come and sponsor our modules).
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Bluebell1234
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(Original post by Harjot)
Some can't teach, some can (just happens to be the case at almost every uni).

The quality of the course is definitely good though (top 5-6), and the department is pretty chill and accommodating (they treat you like humans and actually want you to do well).

There is a lot of stress at times because coursework deadlines get crammed together, so you'll become an expert at consecutive allnighters, which is probably a desirable skill somewhere lol.

Besides Oxbridge and Imperial, Warwick is defo the next tier for CS, and employers absolutely love CS (banks come and sponsor our modules).
Are there more exams or coursework in first year? And are the exams all at the end if the year and what about coursework?
Are theremodules more interesting than others or boring that majority of students like/don't like or is it really up to the individual?
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Harjot
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(Original post by Bluebell1234)
Are there more exams or coursework in first year? And are the exams all at the end if the year and what about coursework?
Are theremodules more interesting than others or boring that majority of students like/don't like or is it really up to the individual?
The first year counts for 10%, which is actually a good thing (compared to all the other subjects).
All exams in first and third year are at the end of the year.

Year 1 involves fairly frequent submissions (biweekly) for the math(s) modules, and a few a term for each module. This is a good thing, because it's very doable to get 80-100% in submissions, vs the humanities subjects/essays who are essentially capped at 70%.

Even though I basically have done it all before, I didn't find anything really boring (except maybe professional skills, which exists because our degree is BCS accredited, so to keep that we have to do that module).

It's always gonna be down to the individual what they like, I'm a very practical person, but the theory is interesting nonetheless, and strengthens my skills, even if what they teach is not directly applicable. At the very least, as soon as you join, they bring you up to speed on Java, and the idea is to be competent with it and the principles behind it by the end of term 1, by building a robot that can navigate through a maze (software).

You'll find some unis that only teach the technology, but that makes you obsolete on graduation, here it's more about the principles, but you'll have to go away and learn the latest stuff yourself.
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JaguarLover101
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(Original post by Harjot)
The first year counts for 10%, which is actually a good thing (compared to all the other subjects).
All exams in first and third year are at the end of the year.

Year 1 involves fairly frequent submissions (biweekly) for the math(s) modules, and a few a term for each module. This is a good thing, because it's very doable to get 80-100% in submissions, vs the humanities subjects/essays who are essentially capped at 70%.

Even though I basically have done it all before, I didn't find anything really boring (except maybe professional skills, which exists because our degree is BCS accredited, so to keep that we have to do that module).

It's always gonna be down to the individual what they like, I'm a very practical person, but the theory is interesting nonetheless, and strengthens my skills, even if what they teach is not directly applicable. At the very least, as soon as you join, they bring you up to speed on Java, and the idea is to be competent with it and the principles behind it by the end of term 1, by building a robot that can navigate through a maze (software).

You'll find some unis that only teach the technology, but that makes you obsolete on graduation, here it's more about the principles, but you'll have to go away and learn the latest stuff yourself.
Hey, I'm hoping to go to Warwick in September, would you recommend the course in general (obviously they all have their ups and downs) are you in one of the later years? If so how are you finding the job/internship hunt?
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Bluebell1234
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(Original post by Harjot)
The first year counts for 10%, which is actually a good thing (compared to all the other subjects).
All exams in first and third year are at the end of the year.

Year 1 involves fairly frequent submissions (biweekly) for the math(s) modules, and a few a term for each module. This is a good thing, because it's very doable to get 80-100% in submissions, vs the humanities subjects/essays who are essentially capped at 70%.

Even though I basically have done it all before, I didn't find anything really boring (except maybe professional skills, which exists because our degree is BCS accredited, so to keep that we have to do that module).

It's always gonna be down to the individual what they like, I'm a very practical person, but the theory is interesting nonetheless, and strengthens my skills, even if what they teach is not directly applicable. At the very least, as soon as you join, they bring you up to speed on Java, and the idea is to be competent with it and the principles behind it by the end of term 1, by building a robot that can navigate through a maze (software).

You'll find some unis that only teach the technology, but that makes you obsolete on graduation, here it's more about the principles, but you'll have to go away and learn the latest stuff yourself.
Thanks for replying,
Do you find those who have not programmed before struggle and find it hard to get a first? I mean I know it says on the website u dont have to code before but I just want to know if that's really the case.
Also, I know any course is hard at university but do you find tye course being really really hard and you have to know about the latest technology to understand any of the lectures or do the lecturers just expect you to know it. If that makes sense.
How do you find the cohort...are people sociable or do people keep to themselves and not dpeak to anyone? I know that may sound crazy but I just have this perception that no one is talking to no one on a CS course.
Do you get personal tutors and are they good?
If you are a third year I'm guessing you have done the optional modules in first and 2nd year. Which one would you recommend to do in first year .. also in 3rd year theres a module called neural computing that sounds interesting have you or anyone else picked that? (if you are a third year)
Thanks
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Bluebell1234
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Also do CS students get a personal tutor? Because on the website it doesn't mention that only seminars but then I i know for otger course like biology they have a personal tutor.
Thanks
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JaguarLover101
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(Original post by Bluebell1234)
Also do CS students get a personal tutor? Because on the website it doesn't mention that only seminars but then I i know for otger course like biology they have a personal tutor.
Thanks
They said on the offer holder day that every student has a personal tutor they meet with a couple of times a term and is the first point of contact.
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Harjot
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(Original post by Bluebell1234)
Thanks for replying,
Do you find those who have not programmed before struggle and find it hard to get a first? I mean I know it says on the website u dont have to code before but I just want to know if that's really the case.
Nope. Most people have done some programming at A-level or GCSE, but it's hardly enough to give them an advantage, as long as you make sure you keep up with lectures. They don't expect you to have anything except Mathematical ability at the start. The only people I know who struggle to get a first are those that make no conscious effort, or give up too easily.

(Original post by Bluebell1234)
Also, I know any course is hard at university but do you find tye course being really really hard and you have to know about the latest technology to understand any of the lectures or do the lecturers just expect you to know it. If that makes sense.
My elitist opinion is that CS, Maths, engineering are a lot tougher and also the top tier subjects for Warwick, as far as I'm aware. There is definitely more work for us than other departments, and the course can get tough, but getting in usually means you're smart enough to hack it. If you have any issues, there's always people to talk to, like your personal tutor, and they're usually very helpful in making sure you get what you need to do well.

You don't need to know anything about the latest technology or whatnot, but they'll also be more focused on teaching you the theory behind the technology than the actual latest technology itself. It's up to the individual how far they'd like to take their interests.


(Original post by Bluebell1234)
How do you find the cohort...are people sociable or do people keep to themselves and not dpeak to anyone? I know that may sound crazy but I just have this perception that no one is talking to no one on a CS course.
Mixed bag. There can be a large element of anti-socialness/social awkwardness, but that's to be expected on a course like this lol. There are people of allsorts on the course though, and you'll defo be able to chat to others. Our year has a big CS FB chat. Regardless, I wouldn't worry, when ya come to uni, there'll be people you click with, and people you don't. I would say on average, CS students at Warwick aren't that bad in this regard compared to many other places.

(Original post by Bluebell1234)
Do you get personal tutors and are they good?
You do. Their ability as a personal tutor is usually related to how good they are a lecturer tbh, but most people have it good. There's usually other people to talk to too if things aren't going well with them. The personal tutor doesn't teach you anything, but is just there to monitor your progress through your time at Warwick and help with any issues.


(Original post by Bluebell1234)
If you are a third year I'm guessing you have done the optional modules in first and 2nd year. Which one would you recommend to do in first year .. also in 3rd year theres a module called neural computing that sounds interesting have you or anyone else picked that? (if you are a third year)
Thanks
In first year, there isn't too much choice if you're looking to stay rigidly on the CS path - Web dev is pretty intense and disgustingly fast-paced but worth it, especially if you've done none before. The other one that most pick is cybersecurity. The lecturer is not great, but it's easy to do well in if you regurgitate what you learn.
3rd year is too far for you to be thinking about now lol. I did not pick Neural Computing, too much Maths for me imo, but many people do pick that. You'd probably also be interested in Machine Learning (which I dropped, too much effort for the reward lol)
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Bluebell1234
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(Original post by Harjot)
Nope. Most people have done some programming at A-level or GCSE, but it's hardly enough to give them an advantage, as long as you make sure you keep up with lectures. They don't expect you to have anything except Mathematical ability at the start. The only people I know who struggle to get a first are those that make no conscious effort, or give up too easily.



My elitist opinion is that CS, Maths, engineering are a lot tougher and also the top tier subjects for Warwick, as far as I'm aware. There is definitely more work for us than other departments, and the course can get tough, but getting in usually means you're smart enough to hack it. If you have any issues, there's always people to talk to, like your personal tutor, and they're usually very helpful in making sure you get what you need to do well.

You don't need to know anything about the latest technology or whatnot, but they'll also be more focused on teaching you the theory behind the technology than the actual latest technology itself. It's up to the individual how far they'd like to take their interests.




Mixed bag. There can be a large element of anti-socialness/social awkwardness, but that's to be expected on a course like this lol. There are people of allsorts on the course though, and you'll defo be able to chat to others. Our year has a big CS FB chat. Regardless, I wouldn't worry, when ya come to uni, there'll be people you click with, and people you don't. I would say on average, CS students at Warwick aren't that bad in this regard compared to many other places.



You do. Their ability as a personal tutor is usually related to how good they are a lecturer tbh, but most people have it good. There's usually other people to talk to too if things aren't going well with them. The personal tutor doesn't teach you anything, but is just there to monitor your progress through your time at Warwick and help with any issues.




In first year, there isn't too much choice if you're looking to stay rigidly on the CS path - Web dev is pretty intense and disgustingly fast-paced but worth it, especially if you've done none before. The other one that most pick is cybersecurity. The lecturer is not great, but it's easy to do well in if you regurgitate what you learn.
3rd year is too far for you to be thinking about now lol. I did not pick Neural Computing, too much Maths for me imo, but many people do pick that. You'd probably also be interested in Machine Learning (which I dropped, too much effort for the reward lol)
Thanks, I found that really helpful.
Did you feel that you kind of expected the course to be as it is. How would you compare your expectations before uni to actually experiencing it now as you have nearly finished it. As in I know it's Warwick so its going to be tough, but was there any point where you felt this is not what I expected and it's too overwhelming? If that makes sense. What advice would you give to prospective students?
Thanks in advance
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Harjot
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(Original post by Bluebell1234)
Thanks, I found that really helpful.
Did you feel that you kind of expected the course to be as it is. How would you compare your expectations before uni to actually experiencing it now as you have nearly finished it. As in I know it's Warwick so its going to be tough, but was there any point where you felt this is not what I expected and it's too overwhelming? If that makes sense. What advice would you give to prospective students?
Thanks in advance
I put Warwick down as a joke initially, since I was really gunning for Oxford and Imperial. I wasn't sure about coming, but I really do like it here and it's brought a new perspective of life forward (I'm a Londoner, born and bred in anti-socialism and strange public etiquette). Now that I'm here, I realise there's a lot more to life than just working and being passionate about software dev.

There are times when it's extremely overwhelming and you have to squeeze everything you've got to get stuff done, but that's part of it and if you keep persevering, you end up getting it done.

I recommend going in with some humility - if you're experienced, don't get cocky, if you're a beginner, don't be scared or too proud to ask for help from everyone else. CS thrives on everyone sharing info lol. Also, do some other stuff, whatever you're into, societies blah blah.
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Hammad(214508)
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(Original post by Harjot)
The first year counts for 10%, which is actually a good thing (compared to all the other subjects).
All exams in first and third year are at the end of the year.

Year 1 involves fairly frequent submissions (biweekly) for the math(s) modules, and a few a term for each module. This is a good thing, because it's very doable to get 80-100% in submissions, vs the humanities subjects/essays who are essentially capped at 70%.

Even though I basically have done it all before, I didn't find anything really boring (except maybe professional skills, which exists because our degree is BCS accredited, so to keep that we have to do that module).

It's always gonna be down to the individual what they like, I'm a very practical person, but the theory is interesting nonetheless, and strengthens my skills, even if what they teach is not directly applicable. At the very least, as soon as you join, they bring you up to speed on Java, and the idea is to be competent with it and the principles behind it by the end of term 1, by building a robot that can navigate through a maze (software).

You'll find some unis that only teach the technology, but that makes you obsolete on graduation, here it's more about the principles, but you'll have to go away and learn the latest stuff yourself.
Hello, am going to firm Warwick for Computer Science. I wil have CS A-Levels, however I would like to know what to do to be better prepared like in summer because the course starts quite late, 1st Oct
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Hammad(214508)
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(Original post by Harjot)
The first year counts for 10%, which is actually a good thing (compared to all the other subjects).
All exams in first and third year are at the end of the year.

Year 1 involves fairly frequent submissions (biweekly) for the math(s) modules, and a few a term for each module. This is a good thing, because it's very doable to get 80-100% in submissions, vs the humanities subjects/essays who are essentially capped at 70%.

Even though I basically have done it all before, I didn't find anything really boring (except maybe professional skills, which exists because our degree is BCS accredited, so to keep that we have to do that module).

It's always gonna be down to the individual what they like, I'm a very practical person, but the theory is interesting nonetheless, and strengthens my skills, even if what they teach is not directly applicable. At the very least, as soon as you join, they bring you up to speed on Java, and the idea is to be competent with it and the principles behind it by the end of term 1, by building a robot that can navigate through a maze (software).

You'll find some unis that only teach the technology, but that makes you obsolete on graduation, here it's more about the principles, but you'll have to go away and learn the latest stuff yourself.
Do you get help for the coursework? or is it completely independent?
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